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  • 1.
    Avby, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ellström, Per-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Knowledge use and learning in everyday social work practice: A study in child investigation work2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, p. 51-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore knowledge use and learning among social workers in everyday child investigation work. Research was undertaken in two Swedish children’s services departments. The study applied an ethnographic approach. Methods for data collection included interviews, participant observations, reflective dialogues and a documentary analysis of case files. The social workers’ knowledge sources were classified into research-based, practice-based and ordinary knowledge. The findings show that the social workers preferred practice-based knowledge, which was primarily conveyed from colleagues and previous experience, and rarely consulted knowledge from sources found outside the practice setting. Furthermore, the findings suggest that the integration of knowledge was made possible through the social workers' engagement in both a verbal and a more cognitive (tacit) reasoning activity, processes that fostered learning at work. The social workers’ learning was predominantly adaptive as they learned to handle tasks in a fairly routinized way on the basis of rules or procedures. The findings lend support to the notion that the use of different knowledge forms could potentially trigger learning in everyday social work.

  • 2.
    Hultman, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alm, Charlotte
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Vulnerable children's health as described in investigations of reported children2013In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 117-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores whether the social services weigh in health aspects, and what these may be, when investigating reported childrens life situation. Information about physical and psychological health aspects for 259 children in 272 investigations was included. Overall, information about childrens health was limited. Problematic emotions were the most commonly reported health aspect in the investigations, whereas suicidal thoughts, self-harm behaviour and gastrointestinal and renal diseases were mentioned least of all. A cluster analysis revealed that the low level of health information group included the largest sample of data and consisted of investigations with minimal information about childrens health. The three other cluster groups, Neurological diseases and psychosomatic symptoms, Emotional health and Physical and psychological health and destructive behaviour, consisted of investigations conducted mostly according to the model called Childrens Needs In Focus (BBIC, in Swedish, Barns Behov i Centrum). Although these investigations also produced limited information, they provided more than those assessed as having a low level of information about health aspects. The conclusion is that it is necessary to increase information about health aspects in investigations if social welfare systems are to be able to fulfil their ambition of supporting vulnerable childrens need of health care.

  • 3.
    Hydén, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    For the childs sake: Parents and socialworkers discuss conflict-filled parenta relations after divorce2001In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Keselman, Olga
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lamb, Michael E.
    Department of Social and Developmental Psychology, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 3 RQ, UK.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Asylum seeking minors in interpreter-mediated interviews: what do theysay and what happens to their responses?2010In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 325-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explored how asylum-seeking minors report information when formally interviewed. Twenty-six Russian-speaking minors (M= 16.0 years of age) were individually interviewed by officials assisted by one of eighteen interpreters. A quantitative analysis examined the translated questions asked by the officials, the minors’ responses to them, and the accuracy with which the minors’ responses were rendered. The asylum-seeking minors distinguished themselves as active participants. They appeared eager to disclose relevant information despite being asked many potentially contaminating questions. Most of the children’s responses were accurately rendered but mistranslations can affect the fact–finding process substantially. Both the minors and the officials involved in the asylum-seeking process need to recognise that both the questions asked and the responses given may be influenced by the third parties involved, i.e. the interpreters.

  • 5.
    Lind, Judith
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Displays of parent suitability in adoption assessment reports2017In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 22, no S1, p. 53-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Through adoption, the state actively contributes to creating families. It therefore also assumes the role of guarantor of the child’s best interests in the adoption process, which entails assessing the suitability of presumptive adoptive parents. In the present article, we use the concluding sections of assessment reports on applicants for intercountry adoption in Sweden to answer the following question: What must be said about an individual or a couple in order for her/them to be seen as a suitable adoptive parent? We thus assume that report conclusions serve to display parent suitability to their audiences. The assessment aligns with Swedish national adoption guidelines, and the study shows how the assessment handbook comes to serve as a catalogue of arguments that not only define good parenthood, but also outline a way of life that is suitable for parenthood. The analysis illustrates how valid arguments for granting consent to adopt refer to three layers of suitability. They include not only the applicants’ insights into and knowledge about adoption in particular and children in general, but also their conventional and orderly life, i.e. a life free from distractions that could hinder a wholehearted focus on children and family life.

  • 6.
    Sandberg, Linn
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Being there for my grandchild: grandparents’ responses to their grandchildren’s exposure to domestic violence2016In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 136-145Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Grandparents whose grandchildren are exposed to domestic violence are faced with some unique challenges in their grandparenting, which have thus far been little discussed in research. This paper discusses the narratives of 10 Swedish grandparents whose grandchildren have been exposed to violence towards their mother. The aim was to explore grandparents’ narrations of their responses in the face of violence, and their understanding of the role they play in their gran- dchildren’s social networks. Two significant responses are discussed: ‘being there’ and ‘acknowledging the independence and self- determination of the adult children’. Grandparents experienced these responses as contradictory and felt powerless when it came to their possibilities to protect their grandchildren. The paper suggests that grandparents could be a resource for domestic violence services, and social work practice needs to assess the roles of grandparents of children exposed to domestic violence. Social workers should con- sider the challenges these grandparents are facing and what support they may need in order to support their grandchildren.

  • 7.
    Severinsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Markström, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Resistance as a means of creating accountability in child welfare institutions2015In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper investigates the identity constructions of youths who are objects of special interventions in the area of child welfare. The aim of the paper was to explore the various dimensions of resistance to institutional identities among youths in special schools and fostercare institutions. Interviews were conducted with adolescents aged between 12 and 15, identified as having social, emotional and behavioural difficulties. The analysis generates knowledge about society’s interventions as well as how adolescents respond to offered institutionalidentities by adopting different kinds of discursive resistance.The paper highlights the different types of discursive resistance that adolescents use to present themselves as accountable individuals anddiscusses the importance of considering resistance as a positive force rather than as something that must be defeated.

  • 8.
    Thulin, Johanna
    et al.
    Linnéuniveristet, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Ceclia
    Linnéuniversitetet, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Doris
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Children's experiences with an intervention aimed to prevent further physical abuse2019In: Child & Family Social Work, ISSN 1356-7500, E-ISSN 1365-2206, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many children across cultures are victims of physical abuse, few treatment models target these children and their parents. In Sweden, Combined Parent–Child Cognitive Behavioural Therapy for families at risk for child physical abuse has been successfully used according to pretreatment and posttreatment studies. However, few studies have explored how physically abused children experience treatment. This study includes 20 physically abused children aged 9–17 who completed Combined Parent–Child Cognitive Behavioural Therapy. Children had a positive overall impression of the treatment and highlighted addressing the abuse, as well as processing their experiences as particularly essential. Children described a positive transformation in their family life as a result of treatment, including violence cessation and bonding among family members. Children experienced the intervention as inclusive and child‐friendly. The implications of the promising findings are discussed.

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