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  • 1.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Carlberg, M.
    National Board for Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hellgren, L.
    National Board for Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Deliberate self-harm behaviour in Swedish adolescent girls reports from public assessment and treatment agencies2008In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 37, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Self-harming behaviour among adolescents, and particularly adolescent girls, has evoked much public attention. This article presents a Swedish study about what information assessment and treatment agencies have about self-harming behaviour in the form of cutting and burning in adolescent girls. The study was made on assignment by the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare. All public agencies assessing or treating adolescents with psychological problems in three Swedish cities were asked to deliver information about self-harming behaviour in the form of self-cutting or self-burning in girls between 13 and 18 years of age. In addition, the young offender institutions within the National Board of Institutional Care treating teenager girls were asked to deliver information about self-harming behaviour in their clients. We found that about 1% of the total population of girls in these ages were known to have cut or burnt themselves and about one third of the girls in the institutions. Attempts to distinguish subgroups among the girls were only partly successful. Although some subgroups could be identified, the overlap between them was large. The conclusion was that this behaviour may be seen as an expression of a wide variety of problems in a heterogeneous group of young persons. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 2.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Hill, Teci
    Lang, Annicka
    Treatment alliance in residential treatment of criminal adolescents2007In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 163-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Research on relationship aspects in residential treatment of criminal young persons has largely been neglected despite the general finding in treatment research that such aspects have a large bearing on outcome. In this article, two studies of associations between relationship aspects and outcome in this treatment context are presented. In one of them, two treatment units practicing Aggression Replacement Training and CBT-techniques and 2 U with more conventional, relationally oriented treatment approaches were studied using process questionnaires and interviews. In the other study, adolescents who had been sentenced to treatment were interviewed about treatment experiences 1 year after release. Despite considerable attrition, several interesting findings were noted: The boys' alliance ratings were associated with the collaborative aspect of the staff's alliance ratings, but not with the bond aspect, warm and close staff feelings were related to negative outcome and the boys' conceptions of the treatment model but not of the relationship with the staff was associated with positive outcome. The results suggest that a distinction should be made between a mutual bond aspect of the staff-boy relationship that was not related to outcome and a collaborative aspect which was related to outcome. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 3.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Jungert, Tomas
    Lunds universitet.
    Callous-unemotional traits, harm-effect moral reasoning, and bullying among Swedish children2017In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 46, no 4, p. 559-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Although callous-unemotional (CU) traits have been associated with bul- lying among children and adolescents, relatively little is known about whether each of the three sub-constructs of CU traits—callous, uncaring, and unemotional—are associated with bullying when they are considered concurrently in the analysis.

    Objective: This study was the first to examine in a single model whether callous, uncaring, and unemotional traits are directly related to the perpetration of bullying and to harm-effect moral reasoning in bullying among children as well as whether these three CU traits are indirectly related to bullying mediated by harm-effect moral reasoning.

    Methods: Self-reported data on CU traits, harm-effect moral reasoning in bullying situa- tions, and bullying perpetration were collected from 381 children from 13 schools in Sweden. Structural equation modeling was used to test the hypotheses.

    Results: When all three sub-constructs of CU traits were included in a single model, greater callousness and uncaring were directly associated with greater bullying. In contrast, greater harm-effect moral reasoning was associated with less bullying. Moreover, greater callousness and unemotional were indirectly associated with greater bullying through the reduced use of harm-effect moral reasoning.

    Conclusions: Our findings demonstrate that all three CU traits are important to address, although their associations with bullying took some different paths, and that callousness appears to be the most important CU trait in relation to bullying. 

  • 4.
    Thornberg, Robert
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rosenqvist, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Johansson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Older Teenagers’ Explanations of Bullying2012In: Child and Youth Care Forum, ISSN 1053-1890, E-ISSN 1573-3319, Vol. 41, no 4, p. 327-342Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    In accordance with the social information processing model, how adolescents attribute cause to a particular social situation (e.g., bullying) they witness or participate in, influences their online social information processing, and hence, how they will act in the situation.

    Objective

    The aim of the present study was to explore how older teenagers explain why bullying takes place at school, and whether there were any differences in explaining bullying due to gender.

    Methods

    Two hundred and fifteen Swedish students in upper secondary school responded to a questionnaire. Mixed methods (qualitative and quantitative methods) were used to analyze data.

    Results

    The qualitative analysis resulted in three main categories and nine subcategories regarding accounts of bullying causes. According to the findings, the youth explained bullying much more often with individualistic explanations (bully attributing and victim attributing) than non-individualistic explanations (social context attributing). Furthermore, girls tended to provide a greater number of bullying explanations and were more likely to attribute bullying causes to the bully and the victim, as compared to boys.

    Conclusions

    The findings provide insights into older teenagers’ understanding of why bullying occurs in school. The study also identified some gender differences but also some mixed findings regarding gender differences in comparison with previous research with younger participants. The authors concluded that more research has to be done to investigate age and gender differences.

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