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  • 1.
    Aarsand, Pål André
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Stockholm University .
    Gaming and Territorial Negotiations in Family Life2009In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 497-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines territorial negotiations concerning gaming, drawing on video recordings of gaming practices in middle-class families. It explores how private vs public gaming space was co-construed by children and parents in front of the screen as well as through conversations about games. Game equipment was generally located in public places in the homes, which can be understood in terms of parents’ surveillance of their children, on the one hand, and actual parental involvement, on the other. Gaming space emerged in the interplay between game location, technology and practices, which blurred any fixed boundaries between public and private, place and space, as well as traditional age hierarchies.

  • 2.
    Eckert, Gisela
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Cognition, Development and Disability.
    'If I tell them then I can' - Ways of relating to adult rules2004In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 11, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores how Swedish children relate to adult discussions and rules concerning children's play and television habits. It is argued that the children interviewed are well aware of adult ideas concerning children, TV and play. In accounting for these rules, the children present themselves as regulated by adults, but also as valuable to their parents. A closer look at the accounts reveals that the children sometimes oppose the descriptions imposed on them and are able to argue against the perceived adult opinion. It is important to point out, however, that the children broadly express a trust in adults and their judgements.

  • 3.
    Eckert, Gisela
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    If I Tell Them then I Can. Ways of Relating to Adult Rules.2004In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Elfström Pettersson, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Children's participation in preschool documentation practices2015In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 231-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish preschool curriculum not only prescribes documentation and quality assessment, it also requires children’s participation in the documentation process, although it offers no directions on how the documenting should be done, which can leave teachers unsure of how to do it. This study differs from research that presents pedagogical documentation as a way of enabling children’s participation in preschool in that it explores children’s participation in producing different forms of documentation in a Swedish preschool – and it finds that such participation is complex. The findings imply that, whether documentation is activity-integrated or retrospective, different forms of participation are possible.

  • 5.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Throwing like a girl? Situating gender differences in physicality across game contexts2003In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 475-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores interaction in same-sex and cross-sex foursquare games, and, in particular, how throwing (and talk) are adjusted along with diverse configurations of players. The game was played among girls and boys with immigrant backgrounds (Syrian, Kurdish, Chilean) from low-income families in a multiethnic school setting in Sweden. The study investigates girls' physicality across various game contexts, finding that as the configuration of players shifts, the forms of bodily actions the girls invoke to construct social identities shift as well. The girls used slams - ways of throwing that require force and muscular strength, physical behaviour that is not conventionally seen as part of femininity. The same girls altered throwing (and language) style, 'throwing like a girl', to downplay physical skills with less skilled girls. In cross-sex games, the girls (and the boys) playfully mock challenged gender meanings such as boys' domination and girls' subordination. The fact that the girls studied here were not restricted in physicality (or spatiality) indicates that there is considerable variation in female physicality. Overall, the findings underscore that studies of girls' (and boys') physicality should be grounded in detailed analyses of interaction in specific game contexts, with attention to cultural and institutional frameworks embedded in the games.

  • 6.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies.
    Corsaro, William
    Play and Games in the Peer Cultures of Preschool and Preadolescent Children : An Interpretative Approach.1998In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 377-402Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Halldén, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Boyhood and Fatherhood. Narratives about a future family life.1998In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 5, p. 23-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Holzscheiter, Anna
    et al.
    Tech Univ Dresden, Germany.
    Josefsson, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Child rights governance: An introduction2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 271-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special issue, we explore child rights governance as the intersection between the study of governance and the study of children, childhood, and childrens rights. Our introduction puts forward a set of theoretical points of departure for the study of child rights governance, engaging with scholarship on human rights, international relations, history, and governance. It links the individual contributions to this special issue with four central dimensions of child rights governance, namely: temporality, spatiality, subjectivity, and normativity.

  • 9.
    Johnson Frankenberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rubenson, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institute.
    The care of corporal punishment: Conceptions of early childhood discipline strategies among parents and grandparents in a poor and urban area in Tanzania2010In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 455-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigates conceptions of early childhood discipline strategies discussed in focus groups with parents and grandparents in a poor urban area in Tanzania. A grounded theory analysis suggested a model that included four discipline strategies related to corporal punishment: to beat with care, to treat like an egg, as if beating a snake and the non-care of non-beating. In order to develop strategies to prevent corporal punishment in the home in accordance with the UN recommendation and article 19 in the Convention on the Rights of the Child, the power of caregiving needs further investigation.

  • 10.
    Johnson Frankenberg, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holmqvist, Rolf
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rubenson, Birgitta
    Department of Public Health Sciences Karolinska Institute, SE- 171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Rindstedt, Camilla
    Department of Child and Youth Studies University of Stockholm, SE- 106 91 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Being and Becoming a Responsible Caregiver: Negotiating Guidance and Control in Family Relationships in Tanzania2013In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 487-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how siblings in Tanzania actively engage in their own socialization through the negotiation and local design of caregiving practices and control between younger siblings (age 1-3), older siblings (age 3-13) and adults. Analyses of moment-to-moment embodied, multimodal sequences of interaction illustrate how caregiving responsibility is negotiated. The analysis is multidisciplinary drawing on concepts developed in the traditions of sociology, language socialization and applied linguistics. The findings highlight the usefulness of a concept of socialization which recognizes the agency of the child and are discussed in relation to constructions of the caregiving child as both being and becoming.

  • 11.
    Josefsson, Jonathan
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    'We beg you, let them stay!': Right claims of asylum-seeking children as a socio-political practice2017In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 316-332Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children’s rights to asylum have emerged as an urgent political challenge. This article uses a number of cases discussed in Sweden’s largest morning paper to analyse claims of asylum-seeking children and how these claims challenge the normative limits of contemporary asylum, concerning what and who ought to be recognized by law. Even though the universality of the child constitutes a running theme, the arguments and the conception of children underpinning the claims are diverse. The article suggests that the claiming of rights as a socio-political practice could be a vital analytical approach to studying children’s rights and offers a much needed alternative to the dominant mainstreaming paradigm.

  • 12.
    Josefsson, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Holzscheiter, Anna
    Technical University Dresden, Germany.
    Child Rights Governance: an introduction2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this special issue, we explore child rights governance as the intersection between the study of governance and the study of children, childhood, and children’s rights. Our introduction puts forward a set of theoretical points of departure for the study of child rights governance, engaging with scholarship on human rights, international relations, history, and governance. It links the individual contributions to this special issue with four central dimensions of child rights governance, namely: temporality, spatiality, subjectivity, and normativity.

  • 13.
    Kasselias Wiltgren, Layal
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing ethnicity: Ethnic wordplay amongst youths2017In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 24, no 3, p. 333-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article illustrates ethnicity as a social construction by highlighting how students use ethnically based concepts to categorize each other as well as the Other. Although the concepts have ethnic connotations, they are mainly concerned with matters of style and behaviour. They are therefore open, fluid and inclusive because the students can alternate between the categories. The analyses draw on 1year of fieldwork in two eighth grade classes in which all students have experience of migration within their families.

  • 14.
    Kaukko, Mervi
    et al.
    University of Oulu, Faculty of Education, Finland.
    Wernesjö, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Belonging and participation in liminality: Unaccompanied children in Finland and Sweden2017In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 7-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article investigates children’s participation and sense of belonging from the perspective of unaccompanied children, based on two qualitative research projects with unaccompanied children in Sweden and Finland. The results show that the unaccompanied children’s own understanding of their participation and belonging in different positions was fluid; for instance, the borders between childhood and adulthood, and striving for independence or wanting to be cared for by adults were flexible, allowing the children’s movement within and between the categories.

  • 15.
    Lind, Judith
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Roots, origins and backgrounds: An analysis of their meanings in the creation of adoptive families in Sweden2012In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 115-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In international conventions as well as in the national discourses of many countries, children who do not grow up with their biogenetic parents have the right to receive information about their origin. The meaning of origin in intercountry adoption, however, is not necessarily the same as in artificial donor insemination (AID). Through an analysis of the material published by the Swedish Intercountry Adoption Authority from 1972 to 2004 and by discussing the often-drawn analogy between adoption and AID, the present article aims to investigate the varying meanings that have been ascribed to origin and the arguments that have been used in support of its importance.

        

  • 16.
    Lind, Judith
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The rights of intended children. The best interests of the child argument in assisted reproduction policy2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 352-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assisted reproduction policies constitute a particularly interesting case for the study of child rights governance as the child here is an intended child. The child's rights are in potential conflict not with the parental, but the reproductive rights of adults. The article aims to analyse the mobilization of the best interests of the child principle as a rhetorical resource in Swedish assisted reproduction policies and to trace the limits of governance in the name of the rights of the child.

  • 17.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sparrman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Cardell, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enacting (real) fiction: Materializing childhoods in a theme park2015In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 171-186Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though fiction and fantasy are fundamental to how childhoods today are understood, thisis a topic that is seldom explored either theoretically or academically. We address the questionof how the relationship between material real and fictive real can be understood in new ways incontemporary society. We suggest that fiction can be understood in other ways than the hithertodichotomized approaches to it, and our aim is to focus on the hybridity that is created throughthe interconnecting word and, as in fiction and childhood and material real and fictive real. Thisarticle explores how fiction can be understood as hybrid and interrelated rather than a pure andseparate phenomenon, and in particular how materiality as something real and fiction as realmingle. This article introduces ways to talk about the fictive real as realunreality and highlightsthe drawbacks that might stem from these concepts since in several ways they re-enact childhoodinnocence and nostalgia, as well as negative differences between childhood and adulthood, wheredifferent childhoods share a subordinate position in society.

  • 18.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ideals of parenting and childhood in the contact zone of intercountry adoption: Assessment of second-time adoption applicants in Sweden2015In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 22, no 4, p. 474-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intercountry adoption is a global phenomenon, a contact zone in which notions of ‘good parents’ and ‘the child’s best interest’ are negotiated. This article explores what norms of parenthood and childhood Sweden, as a receiving country, communicates in the global flow of children and ideas. Adoption assessment reports are examined, with a focus on how adoption applicants are portrayed and how ‘good parents’ are thereby construed. The analysis demonstrates how certain qualities, for example, being loving, self-sacrificing and child-centred, are ascribed to applicants, and how the presentation of ‘good parents’ also defines a proper childhood.

  • 19.
    Malmquist, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Möllerstrand, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wikström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘A daddy is the same as a mummy’: Swedish children in lesbian households talk about fathers and donors2014In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 119-133Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article discusses how 12 children (five to eight years) in planned lesbian familiestalk about families, parents and specifically ‘daddies’ as such and not having a father themselves.Findings from child interviews demonstrate that the children described daddies as ‘the same’ asmummies, i.e. as having the same functions. This contrasts with previous research showing howchildren of heterosexuals often describe mothers and fathers as different. The children varied interms of how they labelled donors. Some children adopted the denomination ‘daddy’, drawing ona paternity discourse, while others simply referred to him as ‘a man’.

  • 20.
    Orrmalm, Alex
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Culture by babies: Imagining everyday material culture through babies’ engagements with socks2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, p. 1-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article takes its point of departure in babies’ engagements with socks and seeks to explore (1) how material culture matters in babies’ everyday lives and (2) how we can understand material culture through attending to babies’ own practices, that is, babies’ culture. The ongoingness, sensoriality and movement of material culture are highlighted, and the article concludes that re-thinking material culture through babies’ engagements with socks means shifting the focus away from objects’ established meaning and towards the materials of those objects.

  • 21.
    Rydström, Helle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Masculinity and punishment: Men's upbringing of boys in rural Vietnam2006In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 329-348Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines men's use of physical punishment when interacting with their sons or grandsons in rural Vietnam. By drawing on two periods of anthropological fieldwork in a northern Vietnamese commune, the article analyses the ways in which violence is informed by, while also perpetually reinforcing, a masculine discourse. Vietnam has ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child and in this spirit virtually all men in the local community disapprove of the use of physical punishment when bringing up boys. However, a father or grandfather occasionally beats his son or grandson when it is deemed necessary to instil discipline in a boy. The article elucidates the ways in which the contradictions between ideals of nonviolent behaviour and actual corporal punishment have fed the construction of certain codes regarding men's beating of boys. Copyright © 2006 SAGE Publications.

  • 22.
    Sparrman, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Through the looking-glass: Alice and Child Studies Multiple2019In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 2, no 1, p. 1-17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This is NOT an article about Alice in Wonderland. It is about the figure of Alice-the-child and an exploration of the contemporary theoretical research field of Child Studies. What if, I ask, Lewis Carroll’s Alice had been one of the sources drawn upon when forming child research theories? The idea is to explore how the fictive child character Alice in Wonderland enacts key theoretical concepts in Child Studies. Out of this exploration grows the idea of Child Studies Multiple.

  • 23.
    Sparrman, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Tobias
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Cardell, David
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The ontological practices of child culture2016In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 255-271Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article asks questions about the ontology of child culture. It aims to position the concept of child culture at the forefront of theoretical research without creating a true or singular definition of the concept. It is rather a conceptual exploration of partial consistencies of child culture in and through practices. The focus of the analyses is on five institutional cultural practices created for children: two childrens museums, a science centre, a theme park and an amusement park. A cross-analysis of these practices provides the empirical material for proposing the notion of child culture multiple.

  • 24.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Students' participation and non-participation as a situated accomplishment2007In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 449-466Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Using an approach inspired by conversation analysis, the present study investigates how Swedish students draw on democratic discourse during group work. The analyses demonstrate the importance of democratic issues to students. The analyses also point to how students repeatedly employ democratic discourse for a number of strategic purposes. Moreover, the analyses show that democratic arrangements at school are not always productive for schoolwork. The results are discussed in relation to previous research. In sum, the study implies that democracy must be studied as an interactive process. This entails a focus on how students do democracy at school rather than how they appear as democratic beings or how they experience student democracy retrospectively. Childhood Copyright © 2007 SAGE Publications.

  • 25.
    Torstenson-Ed, Tullie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science.
    Children's life paths through preschool and school: Letting youths talk about their own childhood - Theoretical and methodological conclusions2007In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 47-66Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article is based upon two studies applying a life history approach, letting 15-to 16-year-olds reconstruct their own childhood in preschool and school, to see what meaning and importance children's experiences have in forming their self-concepts and philosophy of life. A combination of methods was used: written life stories, round tours in the educational settings and interviews. The round tour, a new method, helps the youths to remember and to work inductively, using later experiences, here called post-understanding, to analyse their childhood memories. The results show that relations both with people and content characterized by dialogue and reciprocity are crucial for development and learning, the project of learning and knowledge cannot be separated from the social interpersonal project. Meetings, good or bad, could become existential questions and lead to new choices and values in life. Memory plays an important part both methodologically and in forming the young people's self-concepts, values and philosophy of life. Childhood Copyright © 2007 SAGE Publications.

  • 26.
    Wernesjö, Ulrika
    Uppsala universitet, Sociologiska institutionen.
    Unaccompanied asylum-seeking children: Whose perspective?2012In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 495-507Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent years have seen increasing attention being paid to unaccompanied asylum-seeking children. This article provides an overview of research in the field and its implications for an understanding of these children as a particularly vulnerable category. The existing research focuses primarily on investigating the children’s emotional well-being from psychiatric and medical perspectives. Moreover, in these studies such emotional problems tend to be linked to previous and current traumatic experiences, in particular separation from their parents. By contrast, this article suggests that a critical need exists for research on unaccompanied children’s life situations based upon exploration of their own perspectives.

  • 27.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    From individual to relational strategies: Transforming a manual-based psycho-educational course at school2013In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 20, no 2, p. 215-228Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article focuses on 13-year-old girls’ meaning-making processes during participation in a manual-based psycho-educational course at school. Drawing on childhood studies and ethnographic investigations of subjectivity, I explore how the course is realized in practice. The analysis, based on video-recordings of thirteen classes, shows that the girls and the teachers, through collective transformation, moves the focus from individual potential problems to relational issues. The result demonstrates the weakness of using manual-based educational courses, and indicates that cognitive methods for dealing with negative thoughts could be replaced by exercises designed to deal with interaction and strengthening the individual.

  • 28.
    Överlien, Carolina
    et al.
    Norwegian Centre for Violence & Traumatic Stress Studies.
    Hydén, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Children’s actions when experiencing domestic violence2009In: Childhood, ISSN 0907-5682, E-ISSN 1461-7013, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 479-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is, by analysing childrens discourses, to investigate their actions or absence of actions during a domestic violence episode. The empirical data are recorded group therapy sessions and individual interviews with children who have grown up experiencing their fathers violence against their mothers. The analysis shows that the childrens stories contain two aspects of actions: one related to the actions during the ongoing episode, and one the child perceives as possible/desirable for the future. The findings are discussed in the light of Lazarus and Folkmans theory of coping.

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