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  • 1.
    Danby, Susan
    et al.
    Queensland University of Technology, School of Early Childhood .
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Bullying: The Moral and Social Orders at Play2011In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 25, no 4, 255-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Forsberg, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Bullying and Negotiated Identities: Perspectives of 7th and 8th Grade Girls2017In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 31, no 5, 414-426 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to explore 40 Swedish 7th and 8th grade girls perspectives on bullying by listening to how they discuss and understand bullying. Pair and group interviews were conducted and analysed using grounded theory. Symbolic interactionism was used as a theoretical perspective focusing on social processes and interaction. The participants constructed bullying as an identity process involving gendered identities, victim identities and socially-valuable identities where bullying was located within a gendered order. These identities were negotiated with the concept of self-confidence, where the girls both aligned with and distanced themselves from the gendered order. (C) 2017 John Wiley amp; Sons Ltd and National Childrens Bureau

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-02-08 14:27
  • 3.
    Halldén, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    The child as project and the child as being: parent's ideas as frames of reference.1991In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, Vol. 5, 334-346 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Horton, Paul
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    School Bullying and Social and Moral Orders2011In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 25, no 4, 268-277 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article provides a theoretical consideration of the ways in which school bullying relates to social and moral orders and the relations of power that are central to the upholding of such orders. Moving away from the focus on individual aggressive intentionality that has hitherto dominated school bullying research, the article argues that understanding the social processes of bullying requires not only understanding bullying as a group interactional process but also how such interaction is part of power relations within both the immediate context of the school and the wider society.

  • 5.
    Kvist Lindholm, Sofia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    "Apparently I've Got Low Self-Esteem": Schoolgirls' perspectives On a School-Based Public Health Intervention2015In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 29, no 5, 473-483 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on a psycho-educational programme, DISA, currently practised in the Swedish schools to prevent girls from developing depressive symptoms. We draw on group interviews with schoolgirls to explore how they describe DISA and how an understanding of the programme is constructed through their arguments. We demonstrate how the girls’ version of DISA highlights a contradiction in the intervention that is traceable to the theoretical underpinnings of the programme and the mix of traditions — treatment and prevention — that constitute the intervention. We discuss problematic aspects of DISA and outline implications for policy practice.

  • 6.
    Lago, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Learning, Aesthetics, Natural science. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Different transitions: Timetable failures in the transition to school2017In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 31, no 3, 243-252 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article was to show how transitions are constructed, and to discuss different ways ofmaking the transition from the preschool class to first grade. The analysis is grounded in ethnographicfieldwork. Temporality is used to understand expectations about how transition should be made. Theresults reveal that some children made their transitions in ways that did not follow the expected timeta-ble. These transitions can be understood as timetable failures, and needed to be made sense of by bothchildren and teachers. These different transitions were an important part of the overall construction oftransition. ©

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-07-11 11:10
  • 7.
    Markström, Ann-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Childrens Views of Documentation in the Relations between Home and School2015In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 29, no 3, 231-241 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the article was to shed light on childrens experiences and views of documentation in home-school relations. The study draws on qualitative interviews with 52 pupils in Year 6 in Sweden. The analyses reveal pupils understanding of documents and documentation and how they form an important part of the communication between home and school. Furthermore, the analyses show that children see themselves positioned as objects and messengers between home and school, but also as subjects who resist and use documents and documentation in their own interests.

  • 8.
    Osvaldsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bullying in Context: Stories of Bullying on an Internet Discussion Board2011In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 25, no 4, 317-327 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The paper examines how young people describe experiences of bullying when participating in an Internet community dedicated to young people experiencing mental health problems. The micro-analytic focus demonstrates how young people construct their identities in relation to their telling about their experiences of being victims of bullying, reporting on two distinct ways that they framed their postings. The posters either disclosed their experiences about bullying in relation to a wider self-presentation of experiences of bullying (bullying being part of their past and a partial reason for their problems), or more straightforwardly asked for help and advice from other participants to find ways of dealing with ongoing bullying. Finally, the paper demonstrates how contributors orient to the Internet community, and calls for more research based on unsolicited naturalistic data for such issues as bullying.

  • 9.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Distressed bullies, social positioning, and odd victims: Young people's explanations of bullying2015In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 29, no 1, 15-25 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to investigate to what degree teenagers agree with bullying explanation statements that could be categorised as the odd victim explanation, bully's social positioning explanation, or the distressed bully explanation. A second aim was to investigate how these types of bullying explanations might be associated with gender and self-reported prior bullying roles. Three hundred and fifty teenagers, attending three upper secondary schools in a medium-sized Swedish town, completed a questionnaire. Although the teenagers were prone to agree with all three types of bullying explanations, they were more inclined to think that bullying occurs because the bully wants power or status. Girls were more inclined than boys to think that bullying takes place because the bullies have their own problems. The more the teenagers thought that bullying occurs because the victims are odd, different or deviant, the more they have been involved in bullying situations as bullies or reinforcers. The more the teenagers thought that bullying occurs because the bully has psychosocial problems, the more they have been involved as defenders and the less as bullies or reinforcers in bullying situations.

  • 10.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    'It's not fair!' - Voicing pupils' criticisms of school rules2008In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 22, no 6, 418-428 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Socialisation theories have traditionally focused on how children are socialised in a rather unidirectional manner, according to a transmission model. However, more recent research and theories show that children are not just passive recipients, but active agents in their socialisation process. At the same time, children are subordinated to adult control. In school, they are regimented and involuntarily subjected to mass routines, discipline and control. The aim of this study was to explore and give a voice to pupils' critical thinking about school rules and their teachers' behaviour in relation to these rules. Ethnographic fieldwork and group interviews with students were conducted in two Swedish primary schools. The findings show that pupils criticise some school rules, distrust teachers' explanations of particular school rules, perceive some school rules and teachers' interventions as unfair and inconsistent, perceive no power over the construction of school rules, and express false acceptance and hidden criticism. The findings are discussed in terms of hidden curriculum, power, mentality resistance, democracy, participation and democratic citizenship education. © 2007 The Author(s).

  • 11.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    School bullying as a collective action: Stigma processes and identity struggling2015In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 29, no 4, 310-320 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate the collective action of bullying and its stigma processes and influences on identities. In accordance with interactionism, identity is a social process, constructed and reconstructed in everyday social interactions. Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in four school classes, investigating six bullying cases. Grounded theory methods were used to explore and analyse data. Co-constructing differentness was found to be a core process in bullying. Bullying often appeared to function like a self-serving and socially inclusive ritual in which the bullies co-constructed the ‘normal us’. Loss of belonging, self-deprecation and identity struggling followed closely upon the sense of becoming socially discredited. Victims were trapped in the collective action. The findings highlight the significance of addressing peer cultures and the social psychology of everyday school life in anti-bullying policies and practices.

  • 12.
    Thornberg, Robert
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Teaching and Learning in School, Teacher Education and other Educational Settings. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Shes Weird! - The Social Construction of Bullying in School: A Review of Qualitative Research2011In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 25, no 4, 258-267 p.Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Qualitative research provides opportunities to study bullying and peer harassment as social processes, interactions and meaning-making in the everyday context of particular settings. It offers the possibility of developing a deep understanding of the culture and group processes of bullying and the participants perspectives on peer harassment as well. It gives participants opportunities to discuss their own understanding and experiences of bullying in their own words. This article reviews qualitative studies on bullying or peer harassment in school (including some studies in which qualitative and quantitative methods - so-called mixed methods - have been used).

  • 13.
    Wickström, Anette
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    "One step at a time": Analyzing young patients' video diaries in an ethnographic tracing of fixed appliances2017In: Children & society, ISSN 0951-0605, E-ISSN 1099-0860, Vol. 31, no 3, 183-193 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article examines children’s and young people’s experiences of receiving state-financedorthodontic treatment. Using video diaries and follow-up interviews, the aim was to explore how fixedappliances act on patients’ bodies and social life. The combination of methods reveals complex experiences.The main narrative, primarily found in the interviews, presents a vision of an improved bite thatpatients and orthodontists share. In the video diaries, a parallel narrative of extended bodily hardship isrevealed. Owing to the step-by-step process where appliances are gradually tightened, the young patientsmanage to bear the treatment. However, they cannot foresee its extension.

    The full text will be freely available from 2018-08-04 11:14
1 - 13 of 13
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