liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Department of Clinical Science, Intervention and Technology, Division of Orthopaedics, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tyni-Lenné, Raija
    Department of Physical Therapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Institute for Clinical Sciences, Department for Orthopaedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    The influence of psychological factors on pre-operative levels of pain intensity, disability and HRQOL in lumbar spinal fusion surgery patients2010In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 96, no 3, p. 213-221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:

    To assess the extent to which perceived pain and psychological factors explain levels of disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery, and to test the hypothesis that relationships between pain intensity, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL are mediated by cognitive beliefs and appraisals.

    DESIGN:

    Cross-sectional, correlation study.

    SETTING:

    Orthopaedic outpatient setting in a tertiary hospital.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    One hundred and seven chronic back pain patients scheduled for lumbar fusion surgery.

    MEASURES:

    Visual analogue scale for pain intensity, Short Form 36 mental health subscale, Tampa Scale for Kinesiophobia, Back Beliefs Questionnaire, Self-efficacy Scale, Coping Strategy Questionnaire, Oswestry Disability Index and European Quality of Life Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The group effect of multiple mediators significantly influenced the relationships between pain intensity and mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL. Pain catastrophising significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity and mental health, control over pain significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and functional disability, self-efficacy and pain outcome expectancy significantly mediated the relationship between mental health and HRQOL, and self-efficacy also significantly mediated the relationship between pain intensity, fear of movement/(re)jury and functional disability. The model explained 28, 30, 52 and 42% of the variation in mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, functional disability and HRQOL, respectively.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    This study highlights the strong influence and mediation roles of psychological factors on pain, mental health, fear of movement/(re)injury, disability and HRQOL in patients scheduled for lumber fusion. Future research should focus on screening as well as pre- and post-operative interventions based on these psychological factors for the potential improvement of lumber fusion surgery outcomes.

    Copyright 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Bohannon, Richard W
    et al.
    School of Allied Health, Physical Therapy, University of Connecticut, USA.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Massy-Westropp, Nicola
    School of Health Sciences, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Desrosiers, Johanne
    Research Center on Aging and Faculty of Medicine, Department of Family Medicine, Université de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Québec, Canada.
    Bear-Lehman, Jane
    Steinhardt School of Education, New York University and College of Physicians and Surgeons, Columbia University, New York, NY, USA.
    Reference values for adult grip strength measured with a Jamar dynamometer: a descriptive meta-analysis2006In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 92, no 1, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this meta-analysis was to consolidate the results of studies presenting normative values for grip strength obtained with the Jamar dynamometer in accordance with the recommendations of the American Society of Hand Therapists. Relevant data from 12 sources (3317 subjects) were employed. Means and 95% confidence intervals are presented for the left and right sides of men and women in 12 age groups (20–24, 25–29, 30–34, 35–39, 40–44, 45–49, 50–54, 55–59, 60–64, 65–69, 70–74, 75+ years). The consolidated grip strength reference values offer a better standard for comparison than provided by any single study alone. Limitations in the meta-analysis notwithstanding, the lower limit of the 95% confidence interval can serve as a reasonable threshold for establishing grip strength impairment among adults.

  • 3.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Enthoven, Paul
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of physiotherapists as primary assessors of patients with musculoskeletal disorders seeking primary health care2012In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 98, no 2, p. 131-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To evaluate primary physiotherapist assessment and management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care, and to compare patient satisfaction with primary assessment by a physiotherapist or a general practitioner (GP). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign An observational, retrospective cohort study reviewing medical records, and a separate consecutive non-randomised study of patient satisfaction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting Primary healthcare centre. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants Four hundred and thirty-two patients with musculoskeletal disorders, primarily assessed by a physiotherapist. Fifty-one of these patients primarily assessed by a physiotherapist and 42 patients assessed by a GP answered a patient satisfaction questionnaire. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanInterventions Primary assessment and management of patients with musculoskeletal disorders. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMain outcome measures Data from medical records within 3-month after the visit, and patient satisfaction questionnaire. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults Eighty-five percent (367/432) of patients did not need to see a GP. Serious pathologies were found among the 6% (26/432) of patients who were referred to a GP by a physiotherapist, but no serious pathologies were found among the 9% (39/432) of patients who subsequently returned for a GP appointment for the same disorder. Patients assessed by a physiotherapist were more satisfied with the information received about their disorder and self-care than patients assessed by a GP. Patients also had higher confidence in the ability of physiotherapists to assess their disorder (P andlt; 0.002). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion Physiotherapists can be considered primary assessors of patients with musculoskeletal disorders in primary care as few patients needed additional assessment by a GP, patients with confirmed serious pathologies were identified by the physiotherapists, and patients were satisfied with assessment by a physiotherapist.

  • 4.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Queensland, Australia.
    Peolsson, M.
    Umeå University, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Jull, G.
    University of Queensland, Australia.
    Loefstedt, T.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Trygg, J.
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    OLeary, S.
    University of Queensland, Australia; Royal Brisbane and Womens Hospital, Australia.
    Preliminary evaluation of dorsal muscle activity during resisted cervical extension in patients with longstanding pain and disability following anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery2015In: Physiotherapy, ISSN 0031-9406, E-ISSN 1873-1465, Vol. 101, no 1, p. 69-74Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives To compare mechanical activity (deformation and deformation rate) of the dorsal neck muscles between individuals with longstanding symptoms after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) surgery and healthy controls. Design Preliminary cross-sectional study. Setting Neurosurgery clinic. Participants Ten individuals {mean age 60 [standard deviation (SD) 7.111 who had undergone ACDF surgery 10 to 13 years previously and 10 healthy age- and sex-matched controls. Main outcomes Mechanical activity of the different layers of dorsal neck muscles, measured at the C4 segment using ultrasonography (speckle tracking analysis) during a standardised, resisted cervical extension task. Results A significant group x muscle interaction was found for muscle deformation (Pless than0.03) but not for deformation rate (Pgreater than0.79). The ACDF group showed significantly less deformation of the semispinalis capitis muscle during the extension task compared with the control group [mean 3.12 (SD 2.06) and 6.64 (SD 4.17), respectively; mean difference 3.34 (95% confidence interval 0.54 to 7.21)]. Conclusions As the semispinalis capitis muscle is a powerful neck extensor, the finding of altered activation following ACDF surgery lends support to the inclusion of exercise to train neck muscle performance in the management of these patients. (C) 2014 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf