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  • 1.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Learning Physiotherapy: Physiotherapy students' ways of experiencing the patient encounter1998In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 257-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and PurposeThe aim of this paper was to describe and analyse the impact of formal education and professional experience on physiotherapy students' ways of experiencing interaction within a patient encounter.MethodTwo groups of physiotherapy students were interviewed on two occasions; during the second and last term of their formal education programme, and during the last term and after 18 months' professional experience. Data were subjected to a qualitative analysis. Changes in conceptions between the two interview occasions were described quantitatively.ResultsSubjects' ways of experiencing interaction within a patient encounter could be described in four main categories: Mutuality; Technicalism; Authority and Juxtaposition. Mutuality and Technicalism denoted an integration of the communicative and problem-solving processes involved in the encounter, the former category from a patient-centred and the latter from a physiotherapist-centred perspective. Authority and Juxtaposition denoted a separation of the processes, the former from a physiotherapist-centred perspective and the latter from a patient-centred one.ConclusionsThe results show a trend as regards direction of change in conceptions from separated to integrated perspectives on the communicative and problem-solving processes after the formal education programme. After 18 months' professional practice the Mutuality category dominated.

  • 2.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Almquist, Andreas
    Psychiatric Clinic, Central Hospital, Västerås, Sweden.
    Krook, Johan
    Division of Physiotherapy, Tranås, Sweden.
    Physiotherapists in Balint Group Training.2000In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 85-96Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and PurposeBalint group training (BGT) is a method widely used for enhancing understanding of the relationship and communication between health professionals and their patients. Participants meet in small groups, on a regular basis, with a tutor to discuss their experiences of problem cases. The method was originally developed in the 1950s for enhancing understanding of the doctor-patient relationship. Few studies have focused on BGT and physiotherapists. The aim of the present study was to describe and analyse physiotherapists' experiences of participation in BGT as a means of learning and understanding the physiotherapist-patient relationship.MethodSemi-structured, in-depth interviews were conducted with three physiotherapists working in private practice, all participating in BGT. The intervews were transcribed and subjected to a qualitative analysis.ResultsThe results are presented in a sequential model, featuring eight themes in which the physiotherapists' experiences of the training process are portrayed.ConclusionsThe results suggest that BGT and sharing the experiences of others may be considered a way of enhancing understanding of the patient encounter in clinical practice, possibly to the benefit of physiotherapists and their patients

  • 3.
    Green, Adeline
    et al.
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Queensland, Australia; Physiomax, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Gilbert, Philippa
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Queensland, Australia; Physiomax, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Scott-Young, Matthew
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Gold Coast Spine, Gold Coast, Australia.
    Abbott, Allan
    Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Queensland, Australia; Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Physiotherapeutic rehabilitation following lumbar total disc replacement: A retrospective study2016In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 21, no 3, p. 155-163Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE:

    This study sought to answer the following questions: What are the outcomes of physiotherapy post lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) compared with patient self-mediated rehabilitation? Is a difference in outcomes related to the number of physiotherapy sessions?

    METHODS:

    This is a retrospective observational study of 600 patients post TDR. Patient outcomes for self-mediated rehabilitation (Group 1), 1-3 sessions of clinic-based physiotherapy (Group 2) and ≥4 sessions of clinic-based physiotherapy (Group 3) were analysed. Outcomes measures included the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMQ), Short Form-36 Physical (SF-36 PCS) and Mental Subscale Components (SF-36 MCS), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) for back and leg pain intensity. Patient's pre-operative baseline measures and post-operative follow-up measures at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months post-operatively were analysed.

    RESULTS:

    Oswestry Disability Index and RMQ had significantly lower scores in Group 3 compared with Group 1 at 3, 6, 12 and 24 months follow-up. Significantly lower scores for Group 2 compared with Group 1 were observed for the ODI at 3 months follow-up and for the RMQ at 3 and 6 months follow-up. Significantly lower scores were observed in Group 3 compared with Group 1 for VAS back pain at 3 months and VAS leg pain at 6 months follow-up. Significantly higher scores in Group 3 compared with Group 1 were also observed in the SF-36 PCS at 6, 12 and 24 months. Significantly higher scores in Group 2 compared with Group 1 were observed at 6 months follow up. These trends were also observed when investigating the percentage of patients with a greater 50% improvement in the outcome measure.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Physiotherapy post-LTDR produces statistically significant and possibly clinically important improvements in functional disability, pain and quality of life outcomes compared with self-mediated rehabilitation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  • 4.
    Heiwe, Susanne
    et al.
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Clyne, Naomi
    Living with chronic renal failure: Patients' experiences of their physical and functional capacity2003In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 80, p. 167-177Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. Kamwendo, K
    et al.
    Tingström, Pia
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine.
    Bergdahl, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Svensson, E
    Effect of problem-based learning on stages of change for exercise behaviour in patients with coronary artery disease2004In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 9, p. 24-32Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Kjellman, Görel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hensing, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Department of health and environment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A 12-year follow-up of subjects initially sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses2001In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 52-63Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Purpose Neck/shoulder and low back pain are common in the Western world and can cause great personal and economic consequences, but so far there are few long term follow-up studies of the consequences of back pain, especially studies that separate the location of back pain. More knowledge is needed about different patterns of risk factors and prognoses for neck/shoulder and low back pain, respectively, and they should not be treated as similar conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible long-term differences in neck/shoulder and low back symptoms, experienced over a 12-year period, with regard to work status, present health, discomfort and influence on daily activities.

    Method A retrospective cohort study of individuals sicklisted with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses 12 years ago was undertaken. Included were all 213 people who, in 1985, lived in the municipality of Linköping, Sweden, were aged 25–34 years and who had taken at least one new period of sickleave lasting >28 days with a neck/shoulder or low back diagnosis. In 1996, a questionnaire was mailed to the 204 people who were still resident in Sweden (response rate 73%).

    Results Those initially absent with neck/shoulder diagnoses rated their present state of discomfort as worse than those sicklisted with low back diagnoses. Only 4% of the neck/shoulder group reported no present discomfort compared with 25% of the low back group. Notably, both groups reported the same duration of low back discomfort during the last year, which may indicate a higher risk for symptoms in more than one location for subjects with neck/shoulder problems.

    Conclusions Individuals with sickness absence of more than 28 days with neck/shoulder or low back diagnoses appear to be at high risk of developing long-standing symptoms, significantly more so for those initially having neck/shoulder diagnoses.

  • 7.
    McEvoy, Claire
    et al.
    International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Wiles, Louise
    International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Bernhardsson, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Närhälsan Hönö/Öckerö Rehabilitation, Region Västra Götaland, Sweden.
    Grimmer, Karen
    International Centre for Allied Health Evidence, University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia.
    Triage for Patients with Spinal Complaints: A Systematic Review of the Literature2017In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 22, no 1, article id e1639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to provide a systematic overview of the past decade of literature on processes of triage for patients with spinal pain, outcomes measured and markers of effectiveness.

  • 8.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Intra- and inter-tester reliability and reference values for isometric neck strength2001In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 6, no 1, p. 15-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Age- and sex-specific reference values for neck strength based on reliable measurements in the upright position are lacking. The aim of the present study was to determine intra- and inter-tester reliability and age- and sex-specific reference values for isometric neck strength in extension, flexion and lateral flexion in sitting position measured with the David Back Clinic 140 (DBC 140) equipment.

    METHOD: The reliability of the DBC 140 equipment was investigated in 30 healthy volunteers and reference values were obtained from 101 healthy men and women.

    RESULTS: The reliability study showed that neck strength measured with the DBC 140 equipment has almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability (ICC values between 0.85 and 0.97). The mean value of the first in a series of three measurements was the highest for all three test leaders and for almost all directions. Results from the reference value study showed that gender is a much more important determinant of neck strength than age, body weight or body mass index (BMI). Neck strength in women was, on average, 55% of that in men, and when adjusted for body weight or BMI, the percentages were 70% and 59%, respectively. In all directions observed, neck strength decreased by approximately 20% from age 25 to 64 years.

    CONCLUSIONS: Measurements of neck strength taken in upright position with the DBC 140 equipment have almost perfect intra- and inter-tester reliability and justify the use of this test procedure. The use of the first measurement in a test series can be recommended for use in clinical practice since it was shown to be the maximal test value and thus, had a very low intra-tester difference. The use of reference values for neck strength when evaluating patients with neck disorders needs to take gender into account.

  • 9.
    Sjöholm, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Rehabilitation Centre, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hägg, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Lars
    Department of Health Sciences, Luleå University of Technology, Luleå, Sweden.
    Rolander, Bo
    Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Futurum, Region Jönköping County, Jönköping, Sweden.
    The Cone Evasion Walk test: Reliability and validity in acute stroke2019In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 24, no 1, article id e1744Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To estimate the reliability and validity of the Cone Evasion Walk test (CEW), a new test assessing the ability to evade obstacles, in people with acute stroke.

    Methods

    To estimate the reliability of the CEW, video recordings of 20 people with acute stroke performing the test were assessed by 10 physiotherapists on two occasions, resulting in a total of 400 ratings. Patients performed the CEW (n = 221), functional ambulation classification (FAC; n = 204), Timed Up and Go (TUG; n = 173), TUG cognitive (TUG‐cog; n = 139), Serial 7s attention task from the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA‐S7; n = 127), and the Star Cancellation Test (SCT; n = 151). These tests and side of lesion (n = 143) were used to examine construct validity. The predictive validity was evaluated in relation to falls during the following 6 months (n = 203).

    Results

    The intraclass correlation coefficients for intrarater and interrater reliability were 0.88–0.98. For validity, there were significant correlations between the CEW and FAC (rs = −0.67), TUG (rs = 0.45), MoCA‐S7 (rs = −0.36), and SCT total score (rs = −0.36). There was a significant correlation between the number of cones touched on the left side and the proportion of cancelled stars on the left (rs = −0.23) and right (rs = 0.23) side in the SCT. Among right hemisphere stroke participants (n = 79), significantly more persons hit cones on the left side (n = 25) than the right side (n = 8), whereas among those with a left hemisphere stroke (n = 64) significantly more persons hit cones on the right side (n = 11) than the left (n = 3). Cox regression showed that participants who touched four to eight cones had an increased risk of falls over time (hazard ratio 2.11, 95% CI [1.07, 4.17]) compared with those who touched none.

    Conclusion

    The new CEW test was reliable and valid in assessing the ability to evade obstacles while walking and to predict falls in patients with acute stroke.

  • 10.
    Skamagki, Glykeria
    et al.
    Department of Physiotherapy, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    King, Andrew
    Department of Physiotherapy, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    Duncan, Michael
    School of Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, UK.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Unit of Intervention and Implementation Research Institute for Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    A systematic review on workplace interventions to manage chronic musculoskeletal conditions2018In: Physiotherapy Research International, ISSN 1358-2267, E-ISSN 1471-2865, Vol. 23, no 4, article id e1738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: A review to investigate whether there are effective workplace interventions that manage chronic musculoskeletal disorders.

    METHODS: The literature search included published articles between 2008 and 2017. The databases used in this search were MEDLINE, Scopus, CINAHL, AMED, PsycINFO, Academic Search Complete, Cochrane, and PEDro. A limited search on websites for relevant grey literature was also conducted.

    RESULTS: The review included 12 studies that investigated effectiveness of a specific strength exercise programme or interventions provided by health professionals at the workplace when compared with controls or interventions not at the workplace. Seven studies were classified as high quality (>85% of criteria met) and five studies were classified as acceptable. Studies were heterogeneous preventing a meta-analysis. No intervention was clearly superior to another.

    DISCUSSION: There was some consistency in the results of the selected studies, suggesting that workplace interventions such as high-intensity strength exercises and/or integrated health care can decrease pain and symptoms for employees who experience long-term musculoskeletal disorders. However, the current research is limited.

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