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  • 1.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden; Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Queensland, Australia.
    Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh
    Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Department of Physical Therapy, Neuro R1:07, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden; Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society (NVS), Karolinska Institute, Huddinge, Sweden.
    The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 7, p. 500-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  • 2.
    Abbott, Allan
    et al.
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Halvorsen, Marie
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Dedering, Åsa
    Physiotherapist, Department for Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Is there a need for cervical collar usage post anterior cervical decompression and fusion?: A randomized control pilot trial2013In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 290-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a common surgical intervention for radiculopathy resulting from degenerative cervical spine conditions. Post-surgical cervical collar use is believed to reduce post-operative pain, provide the patient with a sense of security during activities of daily living and even reduce rates of non-fusion. This prospective randomized controlled pilot trial investigates trial design feasibility in relation to prospective physical, functional, and quality of life-related outcomes of patients undergoing ACDF with interbody cage, with (n = 17) and without (n = 16) post-operative cervical collar usage. Results show that the sample provides sufficient statistical power to show that the use of a rigid cervical collar during 6 post-operative weeks is associated with significantly lower levels of neck disability index after 6 weeks and significantly lower levels of prospective neck pain. To investigate causal quality of life or fusion rate outcomes, sample size needs to be increased at least fourfold and optimally sixfold when accounting for data loss in prospective follow-up. The study suggests that post-surgical cervical collar usage may help certain patients cope with initial post-operative pain and disability.

  • 3.
    Bernhardsson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Maria E. H.
    Research and Development Primary Health Care, Region Västra Götaland, Gothenburg, Sweden / The Sahlgrenska Academy at University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    “In the physio we trust”: A qualitative study on patients’ preferences for physiotherapy2017In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 535-549Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient preferences are suggested to be incorporated in clinical decision making, but little is known about preferences for physiotherapy treatment of patients with musculoskeletal pain. This study aimed to explore preferences regarding physiotherapy treatment and participation in decision making, of patients who seek primary care physiotherapy for pain in the back, neck or shoulder.

    Methods: A qualitative study set in an urban physiotherapy clinic in Sweden. Individual, semi-structured interviews were conducted with a purposeful sample of 20 individuals who sought physiotherapy for back, neck or shoulder pain. The interviews were digitally recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results: An overarching theme, embracing six categories, was conceptualised: Trust in the physiotherapist fosters active engagement in therapy. Most informants preferred active treatment strategies such as exercise and advice for self-management, allowing them to actively engage in their therapy. Some preferred passive treatments, primarily acupuncture (because they had heard that it works well) or massage therapy (because “it feels good”). Preferences were consistent across the three musculoskeletal conditions. Key influencers on treatment preferences were previous experiences and media. All informants wanted to be involved in the clinical decision making, but to varying extents. Some expressed a preference for an active role and wanting to share decisions while others were content with a passive role. Expectations for a professional management were reflected in trust and confidence in physiotherapists’ skills and competence, expectations for good outcomes, and believing that treatment methods should be evidence-based.

    Conclusions: Trust in the physiotherapist’s ability to choose appropriate treatment and confidence in the professional skills and competence of physiotherapists, as well as a desire to participate in clinical decision making, fostered active engagement in physiotherapy. Preferences for particular interventions were subordinate, although a preference for active treatments dominated. Preferences for active engagement need to be embraced by the physiotherapist. Awareness of these preferences can facilitate clinical decision making and contribute to increased quality of care for patients with musculoskeletal pain.

  • 4.
    Bäck, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Cider, Åsa
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Herlitz, Johan
    University of Borås, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Mari
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Bengt
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kinesiophobia mediates the influences on attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation in patients with coronary artery disease2016In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 32, no 8, p. 571-580Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: To identify predictors of attendance at exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation (CR) and to test the hypothesis that kinesiophobia mediates the influence on attendance at CR in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Patients: In total, 332 patients (75 women; mean age 65 +/- 9.1 years) with a diagnosis of CAD were recruited at Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Sweden. Methods: The patients were tested in terms of objective measurements, self-rated psychological measurements, and level of physical activity. A path model with direct and indirect effects via kinesiophobia was used to predict participation in CR. An exploratory selection of significant predictors was made. Results: A current incidence of coronary bypass grafting (p amp;lt; 0.001) and a diagnosis of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (p = 0.004) increased the probability of attendance at CR, while kinesiophobia (p = 0.001) reduced attendance. As a mediator, kinesiophobia was influenced by four predictors and the following indirect effects were found. General health and muscle endurance increased the probability of attendance at CR, while self-rated anxiety and current incidence of heart failure had the opposite effect. Conclusions: This study suggests that kinesiophobia has an influence on and a mediating role in attendance at CR. The results need to be further investigated in relation to clinical practice.

  • 5.
    Dannapfel, Petra
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Applying self-determination theory for improved understanding of physiotherapists rationale for using research in clinical practice: a qualitative study in Sweden2014In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 20-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physiotherapists are generally positive to evidence-based practice (EBP) and the use of research in clinical practice, yet many still base clinical decisions on knowledge obtained during their initial education and/or personal experience. Our aim was to explore motivations behind physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice. Self-Determination Theory was applied to identify the different types of motivation for use of research. This theory posits that all behaviours lie along a continuum of relative autonomy, reflecting the extent to which a person endorses their actions. Eleven focus group interviews were conducted, involving 45 physiotherapists in various settings in Sweden. Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis and the findings compared with Self-Determination Theory using a deductive approach. Motivations underlying physiotherapists use of research in clinical practice were identified. Most physiotherapists expressed autonomous forms of motivation for research use, but some exhibited more controlled motivation. Several implications about how more evidence-based physiotherapy can be achieved are discussed, including the potential to tailor educational programs on EBP to better account for differences in motivation among participants, using autonomously motivated physiotherapists as change agents and creating favourable conditions to encourage autonomous motivation by way of feelings of competence, autonomy and a sense of relatedness.

  • 6.
    Furness, James
    et al.
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Johnstone, Scott
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Hing, Wayne
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Abbott, Allan
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Climstein, Mike
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Assessment of shoulder acitve range of motion in prone versus supine: a reliability and concurrent validity study2015In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 489-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: As swimming and surfing are prone dominant sports, it would be more sport specific to assess shoulder active range of motion in this position. Objectives: To determine the reliability of the inclinometer and HALO© for assessing shoulder active range of motion in supine and prone and the concurrent validity of the HALO©. Concurrent validity is based on the comparison of the HALO© and inclinometer. To determine if active range of motion (AROM) differences exists between prone and supine when assessing shoulder internal (IR) and external rotation (ER). Design: The design included clinical measurement, reliability and validity. Methods: Thirty shoulders (mean age = 26.8 years) without pathology were evaluated. Measurements were taken in supine and prone with both an inclinometer and HALO© device. Results: Active ER ROM in prone was significantly higher than in supine when using both devices. Intra-rater reliability (within and between session) intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values ranged between 0.82–0.99 for both devices in supine and prone. An ICC test revealed a significant (p < 0.01) correlation for both devices in IR and ER movements (ICC3,1 = 0.87 and ICC3,1 = 0.72), respectively. Conclusion: This study has shown prone assessment of active ER and IR ROM to be a reliable and appropriate method for prone dominant athletes (swimmers and surfers). In this study greater ER ROM was achieved in prone compared to supine. This finding highlights the importance of standardizing the test position for initial and follow up assessments. Furthermore the HALO© and inclinometer have been shown to be reliable tools that show good concurrent validity.

  • 7.
    Hammer, Ann
    et al.
    Rehab Örebro US.
    Nilsagård, Ylva
    Sjukgymnastik Örebro US.
    Forsberg, Anette
    Rehab Örebro US.
    Pepa, Helena
    Sjukgymnastik Örebro US.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of therapeutic riding (Sweden)/hippotherapy (United States). A single-subject experimental design study replicated in eleven patients with multiple sclerosis2005In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 51-77Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether therapeutic riding (TR, Sweden) hippotherapy (HT, United States) may affect balance, gait, spasticity, functional strength, coordination, pain, self-rated level of muscle tension (SRLMT), activities of daily living (ADL), and health-related quality of life. Eleven patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) were studied in a single-subject experimental design (SSED) study, type A-B-A. The intervention comprised ten weekly TR/HT sessions of 30 minutes each. The subjects were measured a maximum of 13 times. Physical tests were: the Berg balance scale, walking a figure of eight, the timed up and go test, 10 m walking, the modified Ashworth scale, the Index of Muscle Function, the Birgitta Lindmark motor assessment, part B, and individual measurements. Self-rated measures were: the Visual Analog Scale for pain, a scale for SRLMT, the Patient-Specific Functional Scale for ADL, and the SF-36. Data were analyzed visually, semi-statistically and considering clinical significance. Results showed improvement for ten subjects in one or more of the variables, particularly balance, and some improvements were also seen in pain, muscle tension, and ADL. Changes in SF-36 were mostly positive, with an improvement in Role-Emotional seen in eight patients. Conclusively, balance and Role-Emotional were the variables most often improved, but TR/HT appeared to benefit the subjects differently.

  • 8.
    Hermansen, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedlund, Rune
    Department of Orthopaedics , Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg , Göteborg , Sweden.
    Kammerlind, Ann-Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Futurum , Region Jönköping County , Jönköping , Sweden.
    Balance problems and dizziness after neck surgery: associations with pain and health-related quality of life2019In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, p. 1-8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Symptoms of dizziness or imbalance are often present in individuals with a variety of neck-disorders. The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of patient-reported balance problems and dizziness 10-13 years after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease; evaluate associations with neck pain and health-related quality of life; and investigate how these individuals described dizziness.

    MATERIAL AND METHODS: Sixty-eight individuals, 10 years or more after anterior cervical decompression and fusion surgery, who previously participated in a randomized controlled trial were included. Participants completed questionnaires including ratings of dizziness and balance problems, the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, and an open-ended question regarding their experience of dizziness. Secondary outcomes were neck pain and quality of life.

    RESULTS: Seventy-two percent experienced occasional or daily symptoms of unsteadiness and/or dizziness. Intensity ratings for dizziness during movement and for balance problems were similar and rather low, but had an impact on quality of life. Ratings of dizziness at rest were even lower. Dizziness ratings were associated with neck pain. Strenuous activities were related to dizziness and dizziness was primarily described as intermittent and non-rotatory.

    CONCLUSIONS: Dizziness or balance problems in the long-term after surgery for cervical degenerative disc disease are common and have an impact on daily life. Ratings of problem frequency and intensity were usually low. Dizziness and balance problems may affect quality of life. Patients' descriptions of these problems are in line with common symptoms of cervicogenic dizziness.

  • 9. Stenström, C.H.
    et al.
    Bergman, B.
    Dahlgren, Lars-Ove
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Studies in Adult, Popular and Higher Education.
    Everyday life with rheumatoid arthritis. A phenomenographic study among patients.1993In: Physiotherapy Theory and Practice, ISSN 0959-3985, E-ISSN 1532-5040, Vol. 9, p. 235-243Article in journal (Refereed)
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