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  • 1.
    Addelyan Rasi, Hamideh
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Moula, Alireza
    Department of Sociology & Social Work, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Puddephatt, Antony J.
    Department of sociology, Lakehead University, Canada.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Empowering newly married women in Iran: A new method of social work intervention that uses a client-directed problem-solving model in both group and individual sessions2013In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 765-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We set out to assess the processes by which a personal empowerment-oriented intervention based on learning spaces and the Rahyab problem-solving model can help newly married women in Iran to gain more control over their life situations. Learning to use the problem-solving model independently was an important component of this seven months’ educational program. A descriptive field study design based on qualitative methods was employed for data collection and analysis. The analysis of these processes showed how, through group and individual interventions, these women could influence their intimate relationships by altering their thoughts, their management of emotions, and their overt behavior. We invite more research on how empowerment-oriented interventions can be used to support newly married women as a part of family educational programs.

  • 2.
    Bell, Holly
    et al.
    University of Texas Austin, TX 78712 USA.
    Hydén, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Introducing the Special Issue: Social work and the narrative (half?) turn in QUALITATIVE SOCIAL WORK, vol 16, issue 2, pp 161-1652017In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 161-165Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Henriksen, Oystein
    et al.
    University of Nordland, Norway.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Communicating parent community at prevention meetings in Norwegian schools2016In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 55-69Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Parental cooperation has increasingly become a key component in alcohol prevention efforts in schools. Many prevention programs actively utilize parent participation in order to strengthen the sense of community between parents, develop shared attitudes toward alcohol use, delay the beginning of alcohol use for adolescents, and limit alcohol usage by young people. Strengthening community is thus a core goal in prevention activities. This article analyses how community is developed and expressed in discussions during formal school meetings involving parents. The data used in the analysis consists of audio recordings of parent meetings in alcohol prevention programs for eighth-grade students at four separate schools in different regions of Norway. The analysis focuses on how personal pronouns are used in the conversations to signal inclusion or exclusion from the community. The article also discusses how different discursive expressions of community are used by meeting participants to position themselves as responsible parents, and the relevance of these meetings for social work.

  • 4.
    Hydén, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The Teller-focused Interview: Interviewing as a Relational Practice2014In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article traces its origin to 25 years of qualitative study of men’s violence towards women in close relationships. Major methodological concerns have involved finding ways to facilitate and support the research participants – women, men and children – in formulating themselves in as genuine and multifaceted a narrative as possible. Over the years, the approach ‘the teller-focused   interview’ has emerged, with its theoretical and methodological base in feminist research, narrative theory and methodology, and a dialectical way of thinking about the relationship between interviewer and interviewee. It views them as partners with different tasks and responsibilities in the research process. This dialectic is referred to as a ‘relational practice’. It is argued that the methodological concerns brought up are not limited to the area of violence towards women but are also applicable in studies of various types of human experience that are complex, sensitive, and difficult to bring up. Indications for the use of the approach will be addressed, and basic aspects of the relational practice of tellerfocused interviewing will be presented. Some remarks on the relationship between qualitative research and psychotherapy will also be included.

  • 5.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Here and now - there and then: Narrative time and space in intercountry adoptees' stories about background, origin and roots2014In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 539-554Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intercountry adoption policy emphasizes openness in relation to adoptees’ background. However, because intercountry adoption is a complex web of relations including individuals, institutions and countries, it is impossible to foresee what background, origin and roots will mean to the adopted individual. The present article examines what meanings adoptees themselves ascribe to background, origin and roots. A total of 22 internationally adopted men and women participated in focus group conversations. The participants were invited to discuss their diverse experiences and opinions on these matters and their stories were analyzed from a narrative perspective. The analysis focuses how time and space were made significant in narratives about background, origin and roots. Two contrasting stories – the here-and-now narrative and the there-and-then narrative – are discerned, but further analysis of the narrative space and time dimensions shows a much more complex pattern beyond these extremes. Adoptee narratives characterized by an open time dimension deal with what could have happened, alternative lives, and the analysis shows how these alternative lives are storied and valued. Furthermore, when adoptees tell their stories about background and roots, ‘there’, i. e. the birth country, is ascribed different meanings. Our analysis shows that the categorization of space as wide or narrow, in the sense of collective or personal, respectively, is useful in understanding the different approaches to background and roots. Based on the present results, we suggest that social workers may wish to organize their counseling along the time and space dimensions of adoptees’ narratives.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Elin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    What is yet to come?: Couples living with dementia orienting themselves towards an uncertain future2017In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dementia is a chronic illness that not only has substantial effects on the life as well as future for the individuals diagnosed, but also affects those with whom these individuals have relationships. This has implications that need to be addressed by professional practice, not least since social work research has shown that the support available for couples managing dementia is insufficient. There are few studies today of how couples jointly talk about their future with dementia and how they adapt to it as a couple and as individuals. Therefore, this article explores how couples in which one of the spouses has a diagnosis of dementia jointly talk about an uncertain future with dementia. The study benefits from using the conversation analytic method when studying video-recorded interactions among 15 couples living with dementia. The results show that either or both spouses can actively request knowledge about the progression of dementia, but at the same time, the spouses without dementia express awareness of the uncertainty that is connected to a future with dementia. Moreover, either or both spouses may also express contentment with “not knowing.” In all examples, one or several of the participants alternate between taking epistemic stances of knowing and unknowing as well as ascribing stances to others, and spouses can display similar or oppositional stances. The findings suggest a need for developing communicative practice for couples to jointly talk about dementia, as well as a need for social workers to find ways of providing emotional support.

  • 7.
    Olaison, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Creating images of old people as home-care receivers: Categorizing  needs in social work case files2010In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 0, no 0, p. 1-19Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Central to the assessment process in case management is howolder people’s needs are constructed through documentationand case files. This article examines how older people’s needsare categorized in written documentation. Sixteen case filesfrom three social work districts in Sweden were studied usingdiscourse analysis. The results identified two general types ofcase files; the fact-oriented (using objective language) andevent-oriented case file (using more personal language) –which depicted the older individuals quite differently. Allcase files employed several need categories; though socialneeds were important in describing living conditions, it wasmedical and physical needs that impinged on home care decisions.This raises questions about how case documentationdepicts older people through society’s eyes and about thediscourses prevailing in gerontological social work.

  • 8.
    Silvén Hagström, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    'Suicide stigma' renegotiated: Storytelling, social support and resistance in an Internet-based community for the young suicide-bereaved2017In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 775-792Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    From a social constructionist and narrative perspective on grief, which emphasizes the connection between situated storytelling, meaning-making and self-formation, this article explores the power of collective storytelling in an Internet-based community of the suicide-bereaved. This is a context where young mourners who have lost a parent to suicide, among others, turn for social support, which is another main focus of the article. Using Scott and Lymanᅵs taxonomy of ᅵaccounting practicesᅵ to explain ᅵunanticipatedᅵ or ᅵuntoward behaviorᅵ, the approaches to meaning-making of suicide applied in this context for support exchange are analyzed, in the accounts of the parentally bereaved participants and in a co-produced bereavement story. The results showcase how the narrative framing for the interpretation and organization of the suicide experience provided by the website editors as a resistance to the ᅵsuicide stigmaᅵ, together with the power of the experience accumulated by many, can potentially work to destigmatize and empower the parentally bereaved participantsᅵ grief. In addition, this public storytelling is acting to spread ᅵlived knowledgeᅵ and thereby to counteract suicide stigma in society. Ultimately, the results constitute a call for a return to a narrative orientation in social work practice. By adopting a teller-focused approach as part of assessment and treatment, social workers could inspire the often traumatized and stigmatized individuals they encounter to become narrators of their own life- and self-narratives, and to assist in the construction of a more tolerable meaning and identity from their experiences.

  • 9.
    Österholm, Johannes H
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Autobiographical occasions in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia2018In: Qualitative Social Work, ISSN 1473-3250, E-ISSN 1741-3117, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 41-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It has often been argued that identities have a strong connection to stories and storytelling and thus that life stories should be used to individualize care for people with dementia. A problem with this view is that storytellers are seen as individuals, freely reflecting on, composing, and telling life stories. This view becomes especially problematic when persons with dementia tell stories in institutional contexts where certain information is requested and necessary for decision-making. The aim of this study is to investigate how autobiographical stories are used and what functions they have in assessment meetings involving persons with dementia. Fifteen assessment meetings were audio-recorded and transcribed. Narratives were extracted and analyzed by coding who the narrator or narrators were, what the narrator(s) accomplished by telling this story, and what the consequences were for the ongoing meeting. It was found that all interlocutors told stories about the person with dementia. These stories were found to have three functions: (1) to justify why care services were needed; (2) to describe experiences about previous care; and (3) to provide a good working climate. Thus, not all autobiographical stories are the persons story. For care managers in their everyday work it is important to be aware of this and not only be satisfied with a story that suits the organizations needs. Furthermore, stories told in assessment meetings often positioned the person as dependent on others, which could undermine the identity and sense of self of the person with dementia.

1 - 9 of 9
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