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  • 1.
    Andersen Amofah, Hege
    et al.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Norwegian Competence Centre Sleep Disorders, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Haaverstad, Rune
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Ove Hufthammer, Karl
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Kuiper, Karel K. J.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway.
    Hylen Ranhoff, Anette
    University of Bergen, Norway; Haraldsplass Hospital, Norway.
    Norekval, Tone M.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Bergen University of Coll, Norway; University of Bergen, Norway.
    Sleep in octogenarians during the postoperative phase after transcatheter or surgical aortic valve replacement2016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 168-177Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis are an increasing population of patients admitted for surgical aortic valve replacement (SAVR) or transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). Although adequate sleep is important after illness and surgery, it has scarcely been studied in the immediate postoperative phase. Aims: To determine and compare the nature of self-reported sleep and insomnia, and recorded sleep-wake patterns in octogenarians during the in-hospital postoperative phase after SAVR or TAVI. Methods: A prospective cohort design was used that included octogenarian patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI at a regional university hospital. Self-reports were used to document sleep and insomnia, and actigraphy was used to record sleep-wake patterns. Data were collected at baseline preoperatively, and then daily for the first five postoperative days. Results: SAVR patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights later in recovery, while TAVI patients experienced the most insomnia on postoperative nights early in recovery. The median total sleep time, as measured by actigraphy, was 6.4 h, and the median sleep efficiency was 79% for the five postoperative nights, but no differences were found between SAVR and TAVI patients on this parameter. All patients slept more during daytime than at night, with SAVR patients having significantly more total sleep hours for all five days than TAVI patients (p < 0.01). Conclusion: Octogenarians with aortic stenosis had disturbed self-reported sleep, increased insomnia, and disturbed sleep-wake patterns postoperatively, resulting in more daytime sleep and inactivity. In patients undergoing SAVR or TAVI, sleep evolves differently during the in-hospital postoperative phase.

  • 2.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Res Sect, Sweden.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA USA.
    The relationship between physical activity and appetite in patients with heart failure: A prospective observational study2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 410-417Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Physical activity and appetite are important components for maintaining health. Yet, the association between physical activity and appetite in heart failure (HF) populations is not completely understood. The aim of the present study was to investigate the relationship between physical activity, functional capacity, and appetite in patients with HF. Methods: This was a prospective observational study. In total, 186 patients diagnosed with HF, New York Heart Association (NYHA) class II-IV (mean age 70.7, 30% female), were included. Physical activity was measured using a multi-sensor actigraph for seven days and with a self-reported numeric rating scale. Physical capacity was measured by the six-minute walk test. Appetite was measured using the Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire. Data were collected at inclusion and after 18 months. A series of linear regression analyses, adjusted for age, NYHA class, and B-type natriuretic peptide were conducted. Results: At baseline, higher levels of physical activity and functional capacity were significantly associated with a higher level of appetite in the unadjusted models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.019) and the six-minute walk test (p = 0.007) remained significant. At the 18-month follow-up, all physical activity variables and functional capacity were significantly associated with appetite in the unadjusted regression models. In the adjusted models, number of steps (p = 0.001) and metabolic equivalent daily averages (p = 0.040) remained significant. Conclusion: A higher level of physical activity measured by number of steps/day was associated with better self-reported appetite, both at baseline and the 18-month follow-up. Further research is needed to establish causality and explore the intertwined relationship between activity and appetite in patients with HF.

  • 3.
    Ben Gal, Tuvia
    et al.
    Rabin Medical Centre, Israel .
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Patients with a Left Ventricular Assist Device: the new chronic patient in cardiology2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 378-379Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Berben, Lut
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Bogert, Laura
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Leventhal, Marcia E
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norekval, Tone M
    Haukeland University Hospital, Norway.
    Smith, Karen
    Ninewells Hospital, UK.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    De Geest, Sabina
    University of Basel, Switzerland .
    Which interventions are used by health care professionals to enhance medication adherence in cardiovascular patients? A survey of current clinical practice2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 14-21Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Complex medication regimens are often required to manage cardiovascular diseases. As non-adherence, which can have severe negative outcomes, is common among cardiovascular patients, various interventions to improve adherence should be implemented in daily practice.

    Aim: To assess which strategies cardiovascular nurses and allied health professionals utilize to (1) assess patients' adherence to medication regimen, and (2) enhance medication adherence via educational/cognitive, counseling/behavioral, and psychological/affective interventions.

    Method: A 45-item questionnaire to assess adherence assessment and interventional strategies utilized by health care professionals in daily clinical practice was distributed to a convenience sample of attendants of the 10th Annual Spring Meeting of the European Society of Cardiology Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions conference in Geneva (Switzerland) in March 2010. Respondents not in direct clinical practice were excluded. Descriptive statistics were used to describe practice patterns regarding adherence management.

    Results: Of 276 distributed questionnaires, 171 (62%) were returned, of which 34 (20%) were excluded as respondents performed no direct patient care. Questioning patients about non-adherence during follow-up was the most frequently reported assessment strategy (56%). Educational/cognitive adherence enhancing interventions were used most frequently, followed by counseling/behavioral interventions. Psychological/affective interventions were less frequently used. The most frequent intervention used was providing reading materials (66%) followed by training patients regarding medication taking during inpatient recovery (48%). Slightly over two-thirds (69%) reported using a combination of interventions to improve patient's adherence.

    Conclusion: Educational interventions are used most in clinical practice, although evidence shows they are less effective than behavioral interventions at enhancing medication adherence.

  • 5.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    Hjärtmottagningen Ryhovs länssjukhus, Jönköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    'Grasp life again'. A qualitative study of the motive power in myocardial infarction patients2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Myocardial infarction is the most common cause of death in Sweden today and is responsible for approximately 30% of all deaths. The aim of this study was to obtain increased knowledge and understanding of what motive power is and how it affects the individual's rehabilitation and return to a functioning daily life. Thirteen patients, six females and seven males, who had experienced a myocardial infarction, aged between 39 and 72 years and with a minimum interval from myocardial infarction diagnosis of at least 12 months, were interviewed. Grounded theory was the method used for data collection and analysis, since the method is focusing on social processes and interaction. The analysis process identified motive power as a core category: zest for life. The participants expressed a desire and a longing to continue living. The participants' experiences of their disease as well as being discharged from hospital forced them to reorientation. Autonomy, the individual's own active decision-making, plays a significant role in this zest for life. Care for was identified as the support base for zest for life. As health-care professionals we must, at a very early stage on the ward, form an idea of what kind of patient we have in front of us. ⌐ 2003 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 6.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Malm, Dan
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    The impact of comprehensibility and sense of coherence in the recovery of patients with myocardial infarction: a long-term follow-up study2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 276-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: After being through a myocardial infarction (MI), a severe recovery period ensues for the patient. Longterm follow-ups are helpful, but what this should include differs between patients. Today there is no established approach to identify needs for support after an MI. Aim: The aim was to describe sense of coherence (SOC) over time in relation to sex, as well as further SOC in relation to quality of life (QoL) and treatment satisfaction in patients with an MI. Methods. This study had an observational and longitudinal design and followed 18 women and 60 men with an acute MI for 49-67 months after the onset of MI. Instruments used were the SOC-13 and the Seattle Angina Questionnaire. Results: Women scored lower SOC than men. A main effect of time was shown for comprehensibility which increased significantly from baseline to the long-term follow-up. Women increased from a lower level to an equal level as men at the long-term follow-up. The total SOC was significantly associated with QoL and treatment satisfaction. Conclusion: High comprehensibility and high SOC give the patient a better basis to handle life after MI. Thus, healthcare professionals should keep in mind that SOC and especially comprehensibility have meaning for the patients ability to handle her or his recovery. Healthcare professionals need to together with the patient identify and work with lifestyle factors that contribute to increased comprehensibility about the disease, which gives the patient the foundation to preserve and promote her or his health both in the short and long term.

  • 7.
    Bergman, Eva
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden .
    Malm, Dan
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Ljungquist, Birgit
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Meaningfulness is not the most important component for changes in sense of coherence2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 331-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sense of coherence is a theoretical construct which is used to measure the degree to which a person finds the world comprehensible, manageable and meaningful. Aim: The main aim of the present study was to assess the hypothesis of Antonovsky that meaningfulness is the most crucial component in sense of coherence. The second aim was to explore the importance of its components and factors at baseline on sense of coherence changes and if the findings can be used in cardiac rehabilitation. Methods: One hundred patients, who suffered a primary myocardial infarction were followed during two years. The instruments used were; sense of coherence questionnaire-13, 12-item short-form health survey questionnaire, the Seattle Angina Questionnaire and Health Curve. Results: Thirty-nine percent of the participants fulfilled Antonovskys hypothesis. Comprehensibility and the baseline factors of smoking, alcohol use, marital status and disease perception proved to be of importance for sense of coherence changes over time. Conclusion: The hypothesis that meaningfulness is the most crucial component in sense of coherence is rejected for patients with primary myocardial infarction. Comprehensibility is more important than meaningfulness for changes in sense of coherence. Nurses therefore have an important task to increase comprehensibility and sense of coherence by providing information and knowledge about myocardial infarction and lifestyle changes at an early stage. The information should be given in an individualized and easily understandable way from a salutogenic perspective, which means to identify and work with factors that can contribute to preserving and promoting health.

  • 8.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flemme, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Anita
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jinhagen, Britt-Marie
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Carroll, Diane
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hamilton, Glenys
    Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden and Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA, USA.
    Life situation related to the ICD implantation: self-reported uncertainty and satisfaction in Swedish and US samples2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 4, p. 243-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to describe changes in the life situation related to the ICD implantation of Swedish and US samples with regard to uncertainty and satisfaction. The life situation was measured by reference to the uncertainty caused by the condition and satisfaction with the life situation. Inferential statistics were used to analyse changes within and between the Swedish and US samples. Uncertainty showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples before as well as after the ICD implantation. A higher level of uncertainty was indicated for the US sample prior to the ICD implantation and for the Swedish sample following the implantation. In the Swedish sample, satisfaction with life showed a statistically significant difference within the socio-economic domain, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction 3 months after implantation. Satisfaction within the domains of health and functioning, socio-economics and psychological-spiritual showed a statistically significant difference between the Swedish and US samples both before and after ICD implantation, indicating a higher degree of satisfaction in the US sample. The previous study shows that the ICD-patient's life situation is changed after the implantation and that it is necessary to provide the patient with information and education based on their own preconditions. The fact that US sample was investigated at a later stage after ICD implantation than the Swedish sample may have influenced the results of the study.

  • 9.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Healthcare professionals experiences of delivering care to patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 346-352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: An implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a technical device used in the treatment of ventricular arrhythmias. After an ICD implantation, the entire life situation of the patient their next of kin can be affected psychologically and socially. Healthcare professionals play a vital role in providing educational counselling, support and technical follow-up of the device, but little is known about their experiences. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim: This paper describes the experiences of Swedish healthcare professionals in delivering care to patients with an ICD. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A qualitative, descriptive design based on a phenomenographic approach was used. Data were collected through interviews with 12 specialist ICD nurses and 12 physicians, representing 16 ICD implantation centres in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: Two descriptive categories comprising seven subcategories emerged. Striving to provide competent care comprised the subcategories: providing access to care, improving ones qualifications and individualising care. Striving to infuse confirmation incorporated the subcategories: promoting independence, providing existential support, mediating security and comprising needs of next of kin. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: The healthcare professionals described how they wished to develop the care further. Both nurses and physicians were consistent in wanting to provide competent and confirming care based on a holistic perspective with high accessibility to the ICD team. The findings describe how healthcare professionals strive to provide professional clinical care in order to give the patients tools to handle their life situation. They suggested that more structured education and counselling according to guidelines should be provided. They also highlighted the need to increase their own competence by improving their knowledge and skills.

  • 10.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Sleep disturbances in patients with chronic heart failure and their holistic consequences-what different care actions can be implemented?2005In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 4, no 3, p. 183-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Sleep disturbances are prevalent among elderly, especially among those with chronic heart failure (CHF) and can affect all dimensions of quality of life (QOL) negatively. Aim: To describe the most common causes leading to sleep disturbances in patients with CHF, their consequences from a holistic perspective and different care actions that can be implemented. Methods: MEDLINE and CINAHL databases were searched from 1989 to July 2004. Findings: Sleep disordered breathing (SDB), and insomnia were the most common causes for sleep disturbances and occurs in 45-82% (SDB) and one-third (insomnia) of all patients with CHF. SDB cause a disturbed sleep structure with frequent awakenings, as well as several adverse effects on the cardiovascular system causing increased morbidity and mortality. Insomnia, caused by anxiety, an unknown life situation in relation to the debut of CHF, or symptoms/deteriorations of CHF can lead to negative effects on all aspects of QOL, as well as daytime sleepiness. Conclusion: The high prevalence of sleep disturbances and their holistic consequences should be taken into account when nurses asses and plan the care for patients with CHF. Randomized studies with large sample sizes evaluating non-pharmacological nursing interventions that improve sleep are needed. © 2005 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Albers, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Wiberg, Jan
    City Hospital Ryhov.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Vaxjö University.
    6-month CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - A case study from the couples perspective2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 2, p. 103-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is independently associated with an increased risk for hypertension and cardiovascular disease. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce mortality and morbidity, but low compliance rates are seen. Aim: To explore and describe the experiences of CPAP-treatment in a young male patient with severe OSAS during a 6-month period from the couples perspective.

    Methods and the case: A single case study with a phenomenographic approach was employed. Diagnostic procedures of OSAS and initiation of treatment with Auto-CPAP, humidifier and a nasal mask were performed during 4 visits. Conceptions were collected at 4 different occasions during the 6-month period (before, and 2 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months after treatment initiation) by means of interviews with a 33-year old male patient and his female partner.

    Findings: Totally 17 different structural aspects were found to fluctuate during the 6-month period in relation to; influence of stressors, social reactions and adaptation to increase compliance.

    Conclusion: An increased knowledge about the influence of stressors, the social reactions, and the adaptation can help healthcare personnel to identify and better understand concerns of other patients and spouses during different time phases of the initial 6-month period of CPAP-treatment.

  • 12.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Sunnergren, Ola
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing Science, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Gender differences in respiratory disturbance, sleep and daytime sleepiness in hypertensive patients with different degrees of obesity2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 140-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Hypertension (HT) and obesity have both been linked to obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). Difficulties have been described in identifying patients with OSA in primary care, causing low referral rates to sleep clinics. Increased knowledge about gender-specific characteristics and symptoms may help to identify patients. Aim: The aim was to describe gender differences regarding undiagnosed OSA, self-rated sleep, insomnia and daytime sleepiness in middle-aged primary care patients with HT and different degrees of obesity. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used and 394 patients (52.5% women), mean age 57.8 years (SD 6.7 years), with HT (BP >140/90 mmHg) were included. Clinical examinations, respiratory recordings and self-rated scales regarding OSA symptoms, sleep, insomnia and daytime sleepiness were used. Body mass index (BMI) was classified according to the criteria from the National Institutes of Health. Results: Pre-obesity and obesity classes I and II were seen among 53%, 26% and 8% of the men and 37%, 19% and 14% of the women, respectively. Occurrence of mild, moderate and severe OSA increased significantly across the BMI classes for both genders (p<0.01). Ninety percent of the men and 80% of the women in obesity class II had OSA. Insomnia was prevalent in obese patients. Other clinical variables did not differ between BMI classes or genders. Conclusion: The occurrence of overweight/obesity and OSA was high among both genders. A high BMI might be a convenient clinical marker for healthcare personnel to identify hypertensive patients with possible OSA in need of further evaluation and treatment.

  • 13.
    Byrne, Molly
    et al.
    National University of Ireland, Galway.
    Doherty, Sally
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.
    Murphy, Andrew W
    National University of Ireland, Galway.
    McGee, Hannah M
    Royal College of Surgeons in Ireland, Dublin.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The CHARMS Study: cardiac patients' experiences of sexual problems following cardiac rehabilitation2013In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 12, no 6, p. 558-566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background:Sexual problems are common among cardiac patients. Further information is required on patients' experiences of sexuality and preferences for sexual counselling.

    Aim:To characterise sexual dysfunction and related factors among patients following cardiac rehabilitation and examine related treatment delivery.

    Methods:Telephone interviews with 382 patients (32% response rate) recruited from six hospital rehabilitation centres.

    Results:Seventy-nine per cent were male; average age was 64 years (SD 9.8). Forty-seven per cent of the total sample reported no sexual relations in the previous year, and nearly a half of sexually active respondents reported at least one sexual problem. Erectile dysfunction (reported by 33%) and lack of interest in sex (reported by 10%) were the most common problems for men and women respectively. Twenty-three per cent reported that sex had deteriorated for them since their cardiac event, and for half of these this was considered a serious problem. In logistic regression analysis, higher anxiety (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and being male were associated with reporting a sexual problem (χ(2) = 37.85, p<0.001). Sixty-six per cent reported that sex was never discussed by a health professional and satisfaction with this aspect of care was low. Patients wanted these issues to be addressed and the majority (63%) claimed they would find it easy to discuss sexual problems with a health professional.

    Conclusions:Sexual inactivity and sexual problems are common in this group. Health professionals should address sexual issues with their patients, ideally in a private setting and within the broader context of addressing psychological wellbeing.

  • 14.
    Cider, Asa
    et al.
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden .
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Pihl, Emma
    Halmstad University, Sweden .
    Letter: Response to Exercise programmes and quality of life in the elderly: important facts2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 128-128Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15. de Geest, S
    et al.
    Fridlund, B
    Heikkilä, J
    Jaarsma, T
    Mårtinson, J
    Moons, P
    Scholte op Reimer, W
    Smith, K
    Stewart, S
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    A survey of coronary risk factors in a cohort of cardiac nurses from Europe: do nurses....2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, p. 57-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 16. de Geest, S
    et al.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Heikkilä, J
    Jaarsma, T
    Martinsson, J
    Moons, P
    Scholte of Reimer, W
    Smith, K
    Stewart, S
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Undertaking nursing interventions throughout Europe: Research activities of the working group on cardiovascular nursing of the European Society of cardiology2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 3, p. 167-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing is actively involved in international research though the UNITE (Undertaking Nursing Research Throughout Europe) research program, a new initiative for the WGCN. A group of cardiovascular nursing researchers from a number of different European countries committed themselves to a research group that is designed to promulgate international research in the field of cardiac nursing. The first study was a survey on coronary risk factors in a cohort of cardiac nurses from Europe. At this moment four additional studies are planned aimed at the development of the nursing profession in Europe and improvement of care for patients with chronic cardiac disease. If, as hoped, these studies prove to be successful, it will provide the seed for other international collaborations of this type.

  • 17.
    De Geest, Sabina
    et al.
    University of Basel, Switzerland.
    Dunbar, Sandra
    Emory University, Atlanta.
    Froelicher, Erika
    School of Nursing, UCSF, San Francisco.
    Grady, Kathleen
    Rush University, Chicago.
    Hayman, Laura
    New York University.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Building bridges: the American Heart Association-European Society of Cardiology's International Nursing Collaboration2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 4, p. 251-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper described the formal collaboration between the American Heart Association's Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and the European Society of Cardiology's Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing. This collaboration comprises following dimensions: (1). further expansion on collaboration on annual conferences; (2). development of mentoring initiatives; (3). initiation of research collaboration; (4). development of joint guidelines; and (5). appointment of liaison persons of AHA to ESC and vice versa.

  • 18.
    de Loor, Sanne
    et al.
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Netherlands Heart Foundation, The Hague.
    Nurse-managed heart failure programmes in the Netherlands2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 2, p. 123-9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Heart failure (HF) care in Europe is going through a lot of changes. Nurses have increasingly important roles in providing optimal care for these chronically ill patients in the Netherlands. The first steps to organise HF nurses have been taken and an overview of HF management programmes in Netherlands has been recently made available. A descriptive study was performed consisting of: (1) a screening phase in which all hospitals (n=109) and 105 home care organisations were approached by telephone to assess availability of HF management programmes and (2) a questionnaires in which content and organisation of the programmes were described. At the moment, the majority of all the hospitals (75%) have, or are currently developing a HF management programme. In 19 home care organisations (18%) a programme was available and 3 organisations had concrete plans to start on short notice. Components of HF programmes differ considerably, with follow-up after discharge from the hospital as the most often reported component. Other components of programmes include patient education, increased access to health care professionals and adjusting medication. Exercise programmes are not often available. Organisational aspects in regard to setting, financing and staffing also differ between various programmes. It was concluded that there is a considerable increase in the number of HF management programmes in the Netherlands, both hospital based and home based. A lot of questions in regard to the most optimal content and the organisation of HF management programmes remain unanswered.

  • 19.
    de Vries, Arjen E
    et al.
    Department of Cardiology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    van der Wal, Martje H L
    Department of Cardiology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Bedijn, Wendy
    Martini Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Groningen, The Netherlands.
    de Jong, Richard M
    Department of Cardiology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    van Dijk, Rene B
    Martini Hospital, Department of Cardiology, Groningen, The Netherlands .
    Hillege, Hans L
    Department of Cardiology, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Follow-up and treatment of an instable patient with heart failure using telemonitoring and a computerised disease management system: A case report2012In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 432-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the last decades, the introduction of information and communication technology (ICT) in healthcare promised an improved quality of care while reducing workload and improving cost-effectiveness. This might be realised by the use of computer guided decision support systems and telemonitoring. This case study describes the process of care of a patient with chronic heart failure, who was treated with a computerised disease management system in combination with telemonitoring. With the help of these appliances, we think we were probably able to prevent at least two readmissions for heart failure in a period of 10months. We also gained more insight into patient's behaviour with regards to compliance with the heart failure regimen at home. Frequent contact at distance and the online availability of physiological measurements at home facilitated patient tailored education and helped the patient to react adequately to symptoms of deterioration. Additionally, up-titration of heart failure medication was performed without contacting the patient at the outpatient clinic.

  • 20.
    Deaton, Christi
    et al.
    University of Manchester and Central Manchester Foundation Trust .
    Froelicher, Erika Sivarajan
    University of California, San Francisco.
    Wu, Lai Har
    The Hong Kong Polytechnic University.
    Ho, Camille
    Hong Kong Adventist Hospital.
    Shishani, Kawkab
    Washington State University.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The global burden of cardiovascular disease2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10 Suppl 2, p. S5-13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) today is responsible for approximately one-third of deaths worldwide, and that figure will surely increase in both developing and developed countries as risk factors for the disease--primarily dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, physical inactivity, poor diet, and smoking--continue to increase. Although these risk factors are modifiable, to date there is a relative paucity of measures to prevent or control them, particularly in developing countries. A population strategy combined with a high-risk strategy for CVD prevention could greatly reduce the burden of disease in the coming decades. Many initiatives are working, but many more are needed. This chapter provides background on the global burden of CVD and provides the context for the subsequent chapters addressing nurses' roles in reversing the bleak predictions for the ravages of CVD if risk factors are left unchecked in the coming decades.

  • 21. Dickstein, Kenneth
    et al.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    The challenge of implementing heart failure management programmes throughout Europe.2006In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 188-9Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 22.
    Drevenhorn, E.
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Bengtson, A.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Allen, J.
    John Hopkins University School of Nursing, Baltimore, MD, USA .
    Säljö, R.
    Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Counselling on lifestyle factors in hypertension care after training on the stages of change model2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, no 6, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In assisting the nurse's counselling on lifestyle changes in hypertension care a behaviour model can be used.

    AIM:

    To analyse the effects of nurses' training on the use of the stages of change model when counselling hypertensive patients to perform lifestyle changes.

    METHODS:

    As part of a randomised, controlled trial, 19 nurses belonging to the intervention group took part in video-recorded consultation training with simulated patients. To evaluate the training, the nurses audio-recorded their consultations with two patients before and after the intervention. Analysis focused on the areas of non-pharmacological treatment and the nurses' attention to the patients' readiness for change.

    RESULTS:

    Patient participation in the consultations increased after the training. The importance of non-pharmacological treatment was mentioned more frequently for all areas of lifestyle behaviour, exercise, smoking, alcohol consumption, food and stress, and the nurses acquired a more distinct structure for their consultations. The mean length of the recorded consultations increased from 18 min to 20.5 min. All the criteria for fulfillment of attention to patient's readiness to change were met in nine consultations before the training and in seven after it. After the training, attention was paid to support more frequently than before in the action and maintenance stages and a great deal of information was provided.

  • 23.
    Drevenhorn, E
    et al.
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Bengtson, A
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Göteborgs Universitet.
    Evaluation of consultation training in hypertension care2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 8, no 5, p. 349-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nurses in hypertension care play an important role in minimising the risk factors for cardiovascular diseases, but this care can be improved.

    Aim: To evaluate the content of nurses' consultations with hypertensive patients before and after consultation training.

    Methods: Nineteen nurses from a randomised study of nurse-led hypertension clinics at health centres received three days of residential training in patient-centred counselling and cardiovascular prevention. To assess the result, two consultations with hypertensive patients in clinical practice before and after the training were audio-recorded. Content analysis was used for the analysis.

    Results: Diet and exercise were the most frequent topics in the consultations both before and after the training. Discussions about alcohol and the patient's responsibility for treatment increased after the training. The time spent talking about various issues, other health problems, history and appointment scheduling decreased in the consultations after the training.

    Conclusion: After the consultation training, the nurses succeeded in emphasising important issues for risk factor control to a greater extent.

  • 24.
    Ekman, Inger
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg.
    Swedberg, Karl
    University of Gothenburg.
    Taft, Charles
    University of Gothenburg.
    Lindseth, Anders
    University of Gothenburg.
    Norberg, Astrid
    University of Gothenburg.
    Brink, Eva
    University of Gothenburg.
    Carlsson, Jane
    University of Gothenburg.
    Dahlin-Ivanoff, Synneve
    University of Gothenburg.
    Johansson, Inga-Lill
    University of Gothenburg.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Liden, Eva
    University of Gothenburg.
    Ohlen, Joakim
    University of Gothenburg.
    Olsson, Lars-Eric
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rosen, Henrik
    University of Gothenburg.
    Rydmark, Martin
    University of Gothenburg.
    Stibrant Sunnerhagen, Katharina
    University of Gothenburg.
    Person-centered care - Ready for prime time2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 248-251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term diseases are today the leading cause of mortality worldwide and are estimated to be the leading cause of disability by 2020. Person-centered care (PCC) has been shown to advance concordance between care provider and patient on treatment plans, improve health outcomes and increase patient satisfaction. Yet, despite these and other documented benefits, there are a variety of significant challenges to putting PCC into clinical practice. Although care providers today broadly acknowledge PCC to be an important part of care, in our experience we must establish routines that initiate, integrate, and safeguard PCC in daily clinical practice to ensure that PCC is systematically and consistently practiced, i.e. not just when we feel we have time for it. In this paper, we propose a few simple routines to facilitate and safeguard the transition to PCC. We believe that if conscientiously and systematically applied, they will help to make PCC the focus and mainstay of care in long-term illness.

  • 25.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen; Capio St Görans sjukhus, Stockholm.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och omsorg.
    Ekman, Inger
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg.
    The meaning of patient participation for patients and nurses at a nurse-led clinic for chronic heart failure.2006In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 45-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The legislation of many Western countries emphasizes active patient participation. Patients with chronic heart failure (CHF), however, have experienced participation differently from the general interpretation of legal definitions. Education improves uptake of self-management strategies yet knowledge is lacking about support of patients' own resources in CHF.

    AIM: To explore the phenomena of patient participation and non-participation as shown in patient visits to a nurse-led clinic for CHF and as experienced by the patients and nurses.

    METHODS: Data triangulation of field notes from participatory observations and texts from narrative interviews with the patients and assigned nurse specialists. Data were analyzed according to the phenomenological hermeneutic tradition.

    FINDINGS: Patients' experience of participation and non-participation was interpreted as "Being responsible and accepting responsibility" and "Lacking an equal relationship while being controlled", respectively. Nurses experienced patient participation as "Getting information and security to act" and patient non-participation as "Not accepting".

    CONCLUSION: Conflicting values of patients and nurses, which were interpreted with respect to participation and non-participation, presumably might influence patient information and education negatively. The issue of participation should be raised as a means of attaining concordance and to facilitate patient participation with education specifically tailored to the individual patient's needs.

  • 26.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    et al.
    St Görans sjukhus, Stockholm; Örebro universitet, Hälsovetenskapliga institutionen.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och omsorg.
    Ekman, Inger
    Institutionen för vårdvetenskap och hälsa, Sahlgrenska akademin, Göteborg.
    The phenomena of participation and non-participation in health care--experiences of patients attending a nurse-led clinic for chronic heart failure.2004In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 239-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Patient participation is stressed in the health care acts of many western countries yet a common definition of the concept is lacking. The understanding of experiences of patients with chronic heart failure (CHF) who attend nurse-led specialist clinics, a form of care suggested as beneficiary to this group, may promote a better understanding of participation.

    AIM: To investigate the meanings of participation and non-participation as experienced by patients living with CHF.

    METHODS: Narrative interviews analysed in the phenomenological hermeneutic tradition inspired by Ricoeur where the interpretation is made in the hermeneutic circle, explaining and understanding the experienced phenomena.

    FINDINGS: Participation was experienced as to "be confident", "comprehend" and "seek and maintain a sense of control". Non-participation was experienced as to "not understand", "not be in control", "lack a relationship" and "not be accountable". The findings indicate that the experiences of participation and non-participation can change over time and phases of the disease and treatment.

    CONCLUSION: The study suggests an extended view on the concept of participation. Patients' experiences of participation in health care can vary and should therefore be an issue for dialogue between nurses and patients with CHF in nurse-led specialist clinics.

  • 27.
    Ferguson, Caleb
    et al.
    University of Technology Sydney, Australia.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Partnering with patients in shared decision-making for stroke prevention in atrial fibrillation2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 178-180Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 28.
    Forsling, Elin
    et al.
    Norrbotten County Council, Sweden; Sundby Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Robert
    Norrbotten County Council, Sweden.
    Eliasson, Mats
    Sundby Hospital, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    Isaksson, Rose-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Norrbotten County Council, Sweden.
    Health care contact is higher in the week preceding a first myocardial infarction: A review of medical records in Northern Sweden in 20072015In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 14, no 5, p. 450-456Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Prodromal symptoms before myocardial infarction (MI) are common, but there are limited data regarding health care contact prior to the acute onset of MI and the impact of gender on early presentation to health care. Aims: The purpose of this study was to describe and analyse prodromal symptoms reported in medical records and study health care contact in the week before the acute onset of MI in comparison to the general population. Methods: From the Northern Sweden MONICA Study we accessed the medical records of 359 patients aged 32-74 years with a first MI in the county of Norrbotten in 2007. We identified those patients health care contact during the seven days before the MI and compared them with the weekly number of contacts in the general population aged 45-74 years in the county during 2007. Results: We found that 23.1% of the women and 17.6% of the men had at least one contact the week before the MI. With the exception of the 14 women aged 45-55 years, health care consumption in both women and men in all age groups between 45- 74 years of age was 75%-165% higher in the week prior to the MI than in the general population of the same ages. In the first health care contact, pain-related symptoms were most frequent (43%), and fatigue was present in 8% of patients. There were no differences between women and men in health care consumption or presenting symptoms. Conclusion: Both women and men with a first MI are in contact more frequently than the general population in the week prior to the event.

  • 29.
    Gardner, Benjamin
    et al.
    UCL, England.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hrubos Strom, Harald
    Akershus University Hospital, Norway.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Skagerström (Malmsten), Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: From does it work? to what makes it work?: The importance of making assumptions explicit when designing and evaluating behavioural interventions in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 13, issue 4, pp 292-2942014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 292-294Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Hagglund, Eva
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Response to the Letter to the Editor on: Effect of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 1, p. 94-94Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 31.
    Hedberg, Berith
    et al.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum, Sweden.
    Malm, Dan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Ryhov Cty Hosp, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication among patients with atrial fibrillation2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 446-455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Atrial fibrillation is a prevalent cardiac arrhythmia. Effective communication of risks (e.g. stroke risk) and benefits of treatment (e.g. oral anticoagulants) is crucial for the process of shared decision making. Aim: The aim of this study was to explore factors associated with confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication after a follow-up visit among patients who three months earlier had visited an emergency room for atrial fibrillation related symptoms. Methods: A cross-sectional design was used and 322 patients (34% women), mean age 66.1 years (SD 10.5 years) with atrial fibrillation were included in the south of Sweden. Clinical examinations were done post an atrial fibrillation episode. Self-rating scales for communication (Combined Outcome Measure for Risk Communication and Treatment Decision Making Effectiveness), uncertainty in illness (Mishel Uncertainty in Illness Scale-Community), mastery of daily life (Mastery Scale), depressive symptoms (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale) and vitality, physical health and mental health (36-item Short Form Health Survey) were used to collect data. Results: Decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, were independently associated with lower confidence in decision making. Absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness were independently associated with lower satisfaction with risk communication. Clinical atrial fibrillation variables or depressive symptoms were not associated with satisfaction with confidence in decision making or satisfaction with risk communication. The final models explained 29.1% and 29.5% of the variance in confidence in decision making and satisfaction with risk communication. Conclusion: Confidence in decision making is associated with decreased vitality and mastery of daily life, as well as increased uncertainty in illness, while absence of hypertension and increased uncertainty in illness are associated with risk communication satisfaction.

  • 32.
    Hellmark, Marie
    et al.
    Orebro Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Bäck, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change of clinical tests of physical fitness in patients with acute coronary syndrome included in the SWEDEHEART register2018In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 486-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: To maximise the benefits obtainable from exercise-based cardiac rehabilitation, an evaluation of physical fitness using reliable, clinically relevant tests is strongly recommended. Recently, objective tests of physical fitness have been implemented in the SWEDEHEART register. The reliability of these tests has, however, not been examined for patients with acute coronary syndrome. Aims: The aim of this study was to assess the test-retest reliability and responsiveness to change of the symptom-limited bicycle ergometer test, the dynamic unilateral heel-lift test and the unilateral shoulder-flexion test in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Methods: In a longitudinal study design, a total of 40 patients (mean age 63.8 9.5 years, five women), with ACS, aged amp;lt; 75 years, were included at a university hospital in Sweden. The intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) with a 95% confidence interval, standard error of measurement (SEM) and responsiveness in terms of the minimal detectable change were calculated. Results: Excellent reliability was found, showing ICC values of 0.98 (0.96-0.99), SEM 4.71 for the bicycle ergometer test, ICC 0.87 (0.75-0.93), SEM 4.62 for the shoulder-flexion test and ICC 0.84 (0.71-0.91), SEM 2.24 for the heel-lift test. The minimal detectable change was 13 W, 13 and 6 repetitions for the bicycle ergometer test, shoulder-flexion and heel-lift tests respectively. Conclusions: The test-retest reliability of clinical tests evaluating physical fitness in patients with acute coronary syndrome included in the SWEDEHEART register was excellent. This makes the future comparison and evaluation of treatment effects in large unselected clinical populations of acute coronary syndrome possible.

  • 33.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Adelaide, Australia; Royal Adelaide Hosp, Australia.
    Heidbuchel, Hein
    Antwerp Univ, Belgium; Univ Hosp, Belgium; Hasselt Univ, Belgium.
    The management of atrial fibrillation: An integrated team approach - insights of the 2016 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation for nurses and allied health professionals2019In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 88-95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The 2016 European Society of Cardiology guidelines for the management of atrial fibrillation recommends integrated care in the treatment of atrial fibrillation and follows a patient-centred, multidisciplinary team approach. Nurses and allied health professionals have a significant role to play in the management of chronic conditions such as atrial fibrillation, which is underlined by this guideline and the integrated care approach. In this article, members of the task force writing committee highlight significant evidence from this particular guideline as well as clinical implications for nurses and allied health professionals in their daily work with atrial fibrillation patients and their caregivers.

  • 34.
    Hendriks, Jeroen M. L.
    et al.
    Maastricht University, Netherlands.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Editorial Material: Sleep disordered breathing - A hidden co-morbidity in patients with atrial fibrillation? in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 13, issue 6, pp 480-4822014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 480-482Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 35.
    Hendriks, Jeroen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of Adelaide, Australia.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: E-health in patients with atrial fibrillation in EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF CARDIOVASCULAR NURSING, vol 15, issue 4, pp 200-2022016In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 200-202Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 36.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Hälsohögskolan, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Communicating prognosis and end-of-life care to heart failure patients: a survey of heart failure nurses' perspectives2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 152-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Many heart failure (HF) patients have palliative care needs, but communication about prognosis and end-of-life care is lacking. HF nurses can play an important role in such communication, but their views on this have rarely been sought.

    AIMS:

    This study aims to describe HF nurses' perspectives on, and daily practice regarding, discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with HF patients in outpatient care. It further aims to explore barriers, facilitators and related factors for discussing these issues.

    METHODS:

    A national survey including nurses from outpatient clinics and primary health care centres was performed. Data was collected using a questionnaire on communication with HF patients about prognosis and end-of-life care.

    RESULTS:

    In total, 111 (82%) of the HF nurses completed the questionnaire. Most of them reported that physicians should have the main responsibility for discussing prognosis (69%) and end-of-life care (67%). Most nurses felt knowledgeable to have these discussions, but 91% reported a need for further training in at least one of the areas. Barriers for communication about prognosis and end-of-life care included the unpredictable trajectory of HF, patients' comorbidities and the opinion that patients in NYHA class II-III are not in the end-of-life.

    CONCLUSION:

    Although HF nurses feel competent discussing prognosis and end-of-life care with the HF patient, they are hesitant to have these conversations. This might be partly explained by the fact that they consider the physician to be responsible for such conversations, and by perceived barriers to communication. This implies a need for clinical policy and education for HF nurses to expand their knowledge and awareness of the patients' possible needs for palliative care.

  • 37.
    Hoekstra, Tialda
    et al.
    University of Groningen.
    Lesman-Leegte, Ivonne
    University of Groningen.
    van der Wal, Martje
    University of Groningen.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    University of Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nurse-led interventions in heart failure care: Patient and nurse perspectives.2010In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 226-32Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Perspectives of nurses and patients on the intensity and content of disease management programmes (DMPs) in heart failure are seldom addressed but are important in optimizing these programmes. AIM: To describe the perspectives of patients and nurses on delivered care in two DMPs. METHODS: In total 442 patients (62% male; age 68±12years; LVEF 33%±14), assigned to the intervention groups of the Coordinating Study Evaluating Outcomes of Advising and Counselling in HF (COACH), and 32 registered nurses, completed questionnaires on satisfaction with the intensity and components of the DMPs. RESULTS: In spite of large differences in intensity and components, patients were satisfied with the content of both DMPs. In patients (NYHA III-IV), treatment and educational goals were more often achieved in those who received intensive support, compared to patients who received basic support (85% vs. 70%). Patients and nurses perceived that most home visits were adding significant value to the HF care, while 12% of the home visits were perceived as unnecessary by the nurses. CONCLUSION: Patients and nurses did not perceive the intense DMP as an emotional and physical burden for themselves. Patients with severe HF might be in need of more support to achieve optimal treatment and educational goals.

  • 38.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The prevalence of the metabolic syndrome and its risk factors in a middle-aged Swedish population - mainly a function of overweight?2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 21-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The prevalence of obesity, one risk factor for developing the metabolic syndrome (MS), has increased during the last decades. It has therefore been assumed that the prevalence of MS would also increase.

    Aims: The aim was to analyse the prevalence of MS and its risk factors in a middle-aged Swedish population.

    Methods: Data were obtained between 2003 and 2004 from a random population based sample of 502 men and 505 women, 45-69 years old. Measures of plasma glucose, serum lipids, blood pressure, weight, height, waist circumference and self-reported data concerning presence of disease, medication and lifestyle were obtained.

    Results: The prevalence of MS was 14.8 % among men and 15.3 % among women, with an increase by age among women only, 10 % to 25 % (p=0.029). Among individuals with MS the most frequent risk factor was large waist circumference, present in 85 % of men and 99 % of women, followed by high blood pressure, high triglycerides, high glucose and HDL cholesterol (38 % and 47 % respectively).

    Conclusion: The prevalence of MS was 15 %, increasing with age only among women.

    Overweight was a dominant characteristic, and only half of the individuals with MS had glucose/HDL cholesterol levels beyond defined cut points of the syndrome.

  • 39.
    Holst, M.
    et al.
    Malmö Univ. Sch. of Hlth./Soc., Malmo 205 06, Sweden, Department of Cardiology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmo 205 06, Sweden.
    Stromberg, A.
    Lindholm, M.
    Malmö Univ. Sch. of Hlth./Soc., Malmo 205 06, Sweden.
    Uden, G.
    Malmö Univ. Sch. of Hlth./Soc., Malmo 205 06, Sweden.
    Willenheimer, R.
    Department of Cardiology, Malmö University Hospital, Malmo 205 06, Sweden.
    Fluid restriction in heart failure patients: Is it useful? The design of a prospective, randomised study2003In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 2, no 3, p. 237-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thirst is a common and troublesome symptom for patients with moderate to severe heart failure. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment as well as the nature of the disease itself causes increased thirst. There is no evidence in the literature about the usefulness of fluid restriction for heart failure patients. Formerly, when very little pharmacological treatment was available, fluid restriction was one of the few interventional options but nowadays when the pharmacological treatment has improved, its importance may be questioned. This article describes the design of an ongoing study with the aim to determine if an individualised and less restrictive fluid prescription can improve the quality of life, cardiac function and exercise capacity, and decrease in hospital admissions and thirst. This study will be performed as a two-group, 1:1 randomised cross-over study. In group 1, the patients are instructed to comply with a maximum fluid intake of 1.5 l. This is a standard treatment today. In group 2, the patients are recommended to intake a fluid, based on the physiological need of 30 ml/kg body weight/24 h, and are allowed to increase the fluid intake to a maximum of 35 ml/kg body weight/24 h. After 16 weeks, the patients will cross over to the other intervention strategy and continue for another 16 weeks. © 2003 European Society of Cardiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 40. Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Lindholm, Maud
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Telephone follow-up of self-care behaviour after a single session education of patients with heart failure in primary health care2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 153-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Improved self-care behaviour is a goal in educational programmes for patients with heart failure, especially in regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction. Aims: The objectives of the present study were to: (1) describe self-care with special regard to daily self-weighing and salt and fluid restriction in patients with heart failure in primary health care, during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education, (2) to describe gender differences in regard to self-care and (3) to investigate if self-care was associated with health-related quality of life. Methods: The present analysis is a subgroup analysis of a larger randomised trial. After one intensive educational session, a primary health care nurse evaluated 60 patients (mean age 79 years, 52% males, 60% in New York Heart Association class III-IV) by monthly telephone follow-up during 12 months. Results: The intervention had no effect on quality of life measured by EuroQol 5D and no significant associations were found between quality of life and self-care behaviour. Self-care behaviour measured by The European Self-care Behaviour Scale remained unchanged throughout the study period. No significant gender differences were shown but women had a tendency to improve adherence to daily weight control between 3- and 12 months. Conclusion: The self-care behaviour and quality of life in patients with heart failure did not change during one year of monthly telephone follow-up after a single session education and this indicates a need for more extensive interventions to obtain improved self-care behaviour in these patients. © 2006 European Society of Cardiology.

  • 41.
    Hägglund, Ewa
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Hagerman, Inger
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Dencker, Kerstin
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. University of Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Effects of yoga versus hydrotherapy training on health-related quality of life and exercise capacity in patients with heart failure: A randomized controlled study2017In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 381-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: The aims of this study were to determine whether yoga and hydrotherapy training had an equal effect on the health-related quality of life in patients with heart failure and to compare the effects on exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression between and within the two groups. Methods: The design was a randomized controlled non-inferiority study. A total of 40 patients, 30% women (meanSD age 64.98.9 years) with heart failure were randomized to an intervention of 12 weeks, either performing yoga or training with hydrotherapy for 45-60 minutes twice a week. Evaluation at baseline and after 12 weeks included self-reported health-related quality of life, a six-minute walk test, a sit-to-stand test, clinical variables, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Results: Yoga and hydrotherapy had an equal impact on quality of life, exercise capacity, clinical outcomes, and symptoms of anxiety and depression. Within both groups, exercise capacity significantly improved (hydrotherapy p=0.02; yoga p=0.008) and symptoms of anxiety decreased (hydrotherapy p=0.03; yoga p=0.01). Patients in the yoga group significantly improved their health as rated by EQ-VAS (p=0.004) and disease-specific quality of life in the domains symptom frequency (p=0.03), self-efficacy (p=0.01), clinical summary as a combined measure of symptoms and social factors (p=0.05), and overall summary score (p=0.04). Symptoms of depression were decreased in this group (p=0.005). In the hydrotherapy group, lower limb muscle strength improved significantly (p=0.01). Conclusions: Yoga may be an alternative or complementary option to established forms of exercise training such as hydrotherapy for improvement in health-related quality of life and may decrease depressive symptoms in patients with heart failure.

  • 42.
    Höglund, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Stenestrand, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Tödt, Tim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The effect of early mobilisation for patient undergoing coronary angiography; A pilot study with focus on vascular complications and back pain2011In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 10, no 2, p. 130-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The optimal length of bed rest after femoral coronary angiography is still unknown. Short immobilisation could cause puncture site complications due to the modern antiplatelet therapy used, while long immobilisation time increases the risk of back pain for the patient. PURPOSE: To assess the safety, as well as perceived comfort, of early mobilisation after coronary angiography with femoral approach. METHODS: A randomised, single centre pilot trial with 104 coronary angiography patients (including 58 patients with non ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome) assigned to a post-procedural bed rest time for either 1.5 or 5h. The primary endpoint was any incidence of vascular complication. Patients' discomfort was measured as self-perceived grade of pain in the back. RESULTS: The presence of haematomas >/=5cm was 5.8% in the short immobilisation group vs. 3.8% in the control group (ns). There was a significantly lower rate of perceived back pain in the short immobilisation group, compared to the controls, at the time of mobilisation, which remained significant also after 2h of mobilisation. CONCLUSION: Early ambulation after coronary angiography is safe, without affecting the incidence of vascular complications, and decreases the patients' pain, both during and after the bed rest.

  • 43. Jaarsma, T
    et al.
    Fridlund, B
    Stromberg, A
    Thompson, D R
    The European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing.2009In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 44. Jaarsma, T
    et al.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    De Geest, S
    Fridlund, B
    Heikkila, J
    Mårtensson, J
    Moons, P
    Scholte op Reimer, W
    Smith, K
    Stewart, S
    Thompson, DR
    Heart failure management programmes in Europé2006In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 5, no 3, p. 197-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The ESC guidelines recommend that an organised system of specialist heart failure (HF) care should be established to improve outcomes of HF patients. The aim of this study was therefore to identify the number and the content of HF management programmes in Europe. Method: A two-phase descriptive study was conducted: an initial screening to identify the existence of HF management programmes, and a survey to describe the content in countries where at least 30% of the hospitals had a programme. Results: Of the 43 European countries approached, 26 (60%) estimated the percentage of HF management programmes. Seven countries reported that they had such programmes in more than 30% of their hospitals. Of the 673 hospitals responding to the questionnaire, 426 (63%) had a HF management programme. Half of the programmes (n = 205) were located in an outpatient clinic. In the UK a combination of hospital and home-based programmes was common (75%). The most programmes included physical examination, telephone consultation, patient education, drug titration and diagnostic testing. Most (89%) programmes involved nurses and physicians. Multi-disciplinary teams were active in 56% of the HF programmes. The most prominent differences between the 7 countries were the degree of collaboration with home care and GP's, the role in palliative care and the funding. Conclusion: Only a few European countries have a large number of organised programmes for HF care and follow up. To improve outcomes of HF patients throughout Europe more effort should be taken to increase the number of these programmes in all countries. © 2006 European Society of Cardiology.

  • 45.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Netherlands Heart Foundation.
    Are women different than men? Aspects of heart failure in special populations: elderly women2002In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 29-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46. Jaarsma, Tiny
    Back to the future: The Madrid Declaration and the European Heart Health Charter.2007In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 6, no 2, p. 85-6Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University Hospital Groningen.
    Competition in cardiovascular nursing: the winner takes it all?2004In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 115-116Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 48.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Developing the potential of social media in cardiovascular care2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 386-387Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 49. Jaarsma, Tiny
    Heart failure matters.2008In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 7, no 1, p. 1-Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 50.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    International collaborators: More than Facebook friends?2014In: European Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 1474-5151, E-ISSN 1873-1953, Vol. 13, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
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