liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Björkman, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Frida
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundberg, Ann
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Gastroenterology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Gastroenterology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gender differences when using sedative music during colonoscopy2013In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 14-20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Colonoscopy is a procedure often experienced as uncomfortable and worrying. Music has been reported to reduce discomfort during colonoscopy; however, no study in a Swedish setting has been found. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to analyze the effects of sedative music on patients' experience of anxiety, pain, relaxation, and well-being during colonoscopy. Prior to colonoscopy, adult patients (n = 120), aged 18–80 years, were randomly assigned to either an intervention group (n = 60) who listened to sedative instrumental music with 60–80 beats per minute during the colonoscopy or a control group. After the colonoscopy, both groups completed a questionnaire on anxiety, the State Trait Anxiety Inventory, and an anxiety Visual Analogue Scale. Pain, relaxation, and well-being were also measured with Visual Analogue Scales. Women in the intervention group had a lower level of anxiety during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .007) and well-being was significantly higher in the intervention group, especially among men, than in the controls (p = .006 and p = .025, respectively). Men in the intervention group were more relaxed during the colonoscopy than those in the control group (p = .065). Listening to sedative music decreased anxiety among women and increased well-being among men during colonoscopy.

  • 2.
    Boije, Karin
    et al.
    Vrinnevi Hosp, Sweden.
    Drocic, Amra
    Vrinnevi Hosp, Sweden.
    Engstrom, My
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bjerså, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Patients Perceptions of Experiences of Recovering From Acute Pancreatitis An Interview Study2019In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 233-241Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The incidence of registered admissions in inpatient care with a diagnosis of acute pancreatitis was 58 per 100,000 capita in Sweden during the year 2013. Although acute pancreatitis is a well-explored area, there is a demand for research from the patients perceptions. The aim of this study was to describe patients perceptions of recovering from acute pancreatitis. Data collection for this phenomenographical study included 16 individual semistructured interviews. Analysis was done according to the 7 steps suggested by Sjostrom and Dahlgren (2002). Recovery after acute pancreatitis was perceived within 5 categories; a time of physical suffering, an emotional journey, challenges to the usual life and its good qualities, barriers and need for social support, and healthcare as an important factor. Physical and emotional symptoms influence recovery after acute pancreatitis by challenging the good things and things that are taken for granted in everyday life. Promoting factors toward good recovery was a proper support from the social network as well as healthcare providers.

  • 3.
    Fagerström, Carola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Gastroentorology.
    Living With Liver Cirrhosis A Vulnerable Life2017In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 38-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Liver cirrhosis is a chronic liver disease. Patients with liver cirrhosis need to manage the symptoms of the disease and possible complications. Symptoms due to ascites, encephalopathy, and/ or varices are hard to manage and live with. Self-care is necessary for coping with the symptoms and for improving the patients life situation. The aim of this study was to explore the areas of life situation and self-care among patients suffering from liver cirrhosis with complications. Interviews with patients with liver cirrhosis (n = 13), seven women and six men (46-70 years), were performed. Data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The experience of the patients life situation was described from two aspects: vulnerability and reflection on life. Vulnerability was expressed as symptom experience, feelings of loneliness, preconceptions, and limits in daily life. In reflection on life, the patients expressed acceptance and sadness. Self-care dealt with (a) being responsible by observing symptoms and signs; (b) adhering to treatment, prescription, and advice; and (c) the need for more understanding of and information about the disease. When caring for patients with liver cirrhosis, it is important to identify symptoms and feelings and help patients individually to maintain health through self-care.

  • 4.
    Pihl Lesnovska, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Patients' Perspective of Factors Influencing Quality of Life While Living With Crohn Disease2010In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 33, no 1, p. 37-44Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Crohn disease is a chronic inflammatory bowel disease of unknown etiology. The chronic, relapsing nature of Crohn disease produces physical, psychological, and social stress. The disease occurs early in life, and the effects of Crohn disease on daily life are associated with symptom burden; thus, managing their disease and coping with its impact is a lifelong process for sufferers. This study was undertaken to identify and describe the meaning of quality of life in patients with Crohn disease. Using a grounded theory methodology, 11 interviews were performed with 6 men and 5 women, 29–83 years of age, all suffering from Crohn disease. The experience of quality of life was associated with limitations in daily activity, the major theme that emerged from the analysis. Quality of life varied depending on how the patient managed limitations related to the symptoms of the disease. The categories of self-image, confirmatory relations, powerlessness, attitude toward life, and sense of well-being were conceptualized as the dominant themes derived from the data. When caring for these patients, it is important to identify limitations and provide support so that patients are able to maintain a daily life that can be perceived as normal and routine.

  • 5.
    Ring Jacobsson, Lisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of LAH/Linnéa.
    Göransson, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Impact of an Active Patient Education Programme on GastrointestinalSymptoms in Women with Celiac Disease Following a Gluten-free Diet: Randomized Controlled Trial2012In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 200-206Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite living with a gluten-free diet Swedish women with celiac disease report a higher rate of gastrointestinal symptoms than women without the disease. This study was designed to assess the impact of active patient education on gastrointestinal symptoms in women with a gluten-free diet. A total of 106 Swedish women, > 20 years, with celiac disease on a gluten free diet for minimum five years took part in a randomized, controlled trial. The intervention group (n=54) underwent a ten-session educational program “Celiac School”, based on problem-based learning. Controls (n=52) were sent information regarding celiac disease at home. Outcome measure was gastrointestinal symptoms at ten weeks and six months after intervention, assessed with the Gastrointestinal Symptom Rating Scale. After ten weeks “Celiac school” (p=0.013) the participating women reported significant improvements that remained six months later (p=0.029). The controls did not improve significantly. A comparison of the development of scores, from baseline to 10 weeks, could not demonstrate a significant difference in the overall index between the two groups but showed a significant improvement concerning one of its components, namely the index reflecting Abdominal Pain (p= 0.007). Intervention methods should be refined in order to reach an even more pronounced effect.

  • 6.
    Roos, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ingrid, Hellström
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallert, Claes
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Internal Medicine in Norrköping.
    Susan, Wilhelmsson
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Everyday life for women with celiac disease2013In: Gastroenterology Nursing, ISSN 1042-895X, E-ISSN 1538-9766, Vol. 36, no 4, p. 266-273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to explore how women with celiac disease experience everyday life. It is important that healthcare professionals understand what it is like to live with a chronic illness, and also the factors that affect the lives of women who have celiac disease. The study has a qualitative approach and the data were collected using interviews with 16 women. A conventional content analysis was used for the subjective interpretation of the qualitative interviews. Three main themes emerged in the analysis: illness trajectory and treatment, socializing with others, and feelings of loneliness and worry. The findings indicate that living with celiac disease affects the person's entire life from the past, in the present, and into the future, especially when daily routines must be altered. The women expressed a sense of loneliness and invisibility, especially when socializing with others. The diet could be a friend, enemy, obstacle, or opportunity in terms of enjoying a good life. Supporting women diagnosed with celiac disease appears to be a major task for healthcare professionals. Such professionals need to pay attention to women's symptoms, worries, and their feeling of being invisible.

1 - 6 of 6
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf