liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wambui, Theresah
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Perceptions of family planning among low-income men in Western Kenya: Original Article2009In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 56, no 3, p. 340-345Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Men have rarely been involved in either receiving or providing information on sexuality, reproductive health or birth spacing. They have also been ignored or excluded in one way or the other from participating in many family planning programmes as family planning is viewed as a womans affair.

    Aim: To describe the perceptions of family planning among low-income men in Western Kenya. Methods: A qualitative study using focus group interviews and content analysis was conducted, with 64 men aged 15-54 years participating actively.

    Findings: Perceptions of family planning were manifold. For example, some perceived it as meaning having the number of children one is able to provide for. Most men knew about traditional and modern methods of birth control, although their knowledge was poor and misconceived. Modern methods were thought to give side effects, discouraging family planning. Low instances of family planning were also because of the fact that culturally, children are considered wealth. A law advocating family size limitation was regarded as necessary for the future.

    Conclusion: Mens perceptions of family planning are manifold. Their knowledge about contraception is poor and sometimes misconceived. Preferences regarding a childs gender are strong, thus attitudes and cultural beliefs that might hinder family planning have to be considered. A policy on male contraception and contraceptive services is seen as necessary.

  • 2.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    What do women think about menopause? A qualitative study of women's expectations, apprehensions and knowledge about the climacteric period2003In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 109-118Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To identify and describe expectations, apprehensions and knowledge about the menopausal period and climacteric symptoms. Method: Data were collected by semi-structured interviews/discussions with a convenience sample of 39 women, all 47 years of age. Data interpretation and analysis were based on content analysis, but influenced by a qualitative approach. Findings: These included women's expectations and feelings of freedom. Apprehensions were described as different climacteric symptoms, which were well known to the women through their own or other's experiences. The women were, to some extent, aware of the physical and psychological changes that follow the menopause. However, the women lacked knowledge about these changes or self-care activities that could prevent problems or mitigate symptoms. Key conclusions and implications for practice: Discussions on health with premenopausal women can increase their knowledge about a natural phase of life, the climacteric period. The study showed that nurses/midwives who have regular contact with some women during their life have an important role to play in providing information, as well as in the treatment of climacteric symptoms.

  • 3.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Johansson, G.
    Univ. College of Health Sciences, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Compliance with hormone replacement therapy among Swedish women2001In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 48, no 4, p. 224-232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    By means of a simple postal questionnaire, all women registered as hormone therapy patients (n = 241) at a gynaecological clinic were screened for reasons for receiving hormone therapy. They were also screened for their compliance in following the midwife's advice and information, as well as the gynaecologist's prescriptions. The majority of the women participating in this study contacted the clinic for climacteric symptoms. The time duration for using hormone therapy ranged from 1 month to 6 years. Those using a plaster or gel were asked why they should take progesterone pills. Forty per cent gave erroneous answers or did not know. Of these, 62% reported that they understood the oral information, whereas 60% reported that they understood the written information. Fifty-three per cent of the women stated that they would stop their hormone therapy if they did not feel well or increased in weight. New discoveries or information about benefits or risks were given by 22% as reasons affecting their decision. Compliance demands well-motivated and well-informed patients. The implication of the study result for practice is that there must be dialogue between the women and their midwife/ gynaecologist. It is important that the women feel they are receiving treatment which they have given their consent to, and that they feel and know that they are performing self-care. Midwives have recurrent contact with women during their life and have already established a relationship with them, which facilitates an individualized communication.

  • 4.
    Fägerskiöld, Astrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Expectations of the child health nurse in Sweden: two perspectives2003In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 50, no 2, p. 119-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: the child health service exists to support and stimulate parents in order to reduce stress and to encourage an advantageous development of the preschool child.

    Aim: To explore and describe similarities and differences in expectations of the child health nurse, from the perspective of the recently delivered first-time mother, as compared to an expression of what the child health nurse believed mothers of infants expected of them. The data consisted of 15 interviews with child health nurses and 20 interviews with first-time mothers. Thematic content analysis resulted in seven categories of expectations. The child health nurse was expected to be someone to approach, who could assess the child's development and give immunizations and to be a supporter, counsellor, safety provider and a parent group organizer with knowledge. Similarities between the mothers’ and the nurses’ statements occurred more frequently than differences, which is suggested to depend on the Swedish tradition among new mothers of visiting the child health clinic. The mothers expected participation in parent groups to a higher degree than the nurses thought they did. Child health nurses who fulfil the mothers’ expectations appear to require a good relationship with the mother in order to find out what she desires, which the allocation of sufficient time for regular meetings, will facilitate. Moreover, the nurse requires knowledge about children's requirements and the transition to motherhood as well as the father's important role.

  • 5.
    Hadziabdic, Emina
    et al.
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Heikkilä, K
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Albin, B
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    School of Health Science and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Migrants' perceptions of using interpreters in health care2009In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 56, no 4, p. 461-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The number of foreign-born people who do not share a common language has increased due to extensive international migration, which will increase in the future. There is limited knowledge about the users' perceptions of interpreters in health care. Aim: To describe how individuals from former Yugoslavia, living in Sweden, perceived the use of interpreters in Swedish healthcare services.

    METHOD: A phenomenographic approach was employed. Data were collected by semi-structured interviews during 2006-2007 with 17 people, aged 29-75 years, from former Yugoslavia, living in Sweden.

    FINDINGS: Three descriptive categories were identified: (1) prerequisites for good interpretation situations; (2) the interpretation situation - aspects of satisfaction or dissatisfaction; and (3) measures to facilitate and improve the interpreter situation. The interpreter's competence, attitude, appearance and an appropriate environment are important prerequisites for interpretation. The interpreter was perceived as being a communication aid and a guide in the healthcare system in terms of information and practical issues, but also as a hindrance. A desirable professional interpreter was perceived as highly skilled in medical terminology and language, working in face-to-face interaction.

    CONCLUSION: Using an interpreter was perceived as a hindrance, though also needed in communication with healthcare staff and as a guide in the healthcare system. Face-to-face interaction was preferred, with the interpreter as an aid to communication. As part of individual care planning it is important to use interpreters according to the patients' desires. Healthcare organizations and guidelines for interpreters need to be developed in order for patients to have easy access to highly skilled professional interpreters.

  • 6.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    School of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Nambozi, G
    Department of Nursing, Mbarara University of Science and Technology (MUST), Uganda.
    Beliefs about health and illness: a comparison between Ugandan men and women living with diabetes mellitus2008In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 55, no 4, p. 434-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The diabetes mellitus (DM) pandemic greatly affects developing countries. Self-care is an important part of management, guided by beliefs about health and illness. Dissimilarities in health-related behaviour in men and women have been described but not comparisons of their beliefs about health and illness.

    AIM: To explore beliefs about health and illness that might affect self-care practice and healthcare-seeking behaviour in men and women with DM in Uganda.

    METHODS: This was an exploratory study with a consecutive sample from an outpatient diabetes clinic at a university hospital. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 women and 10 men aged 21-70 years. Data analysis was conducted by qualitative content analysis.

    FINDINGS: Men's and women's beliefs about health and illness indicated limited knowledge about the body and DM. Dissimilar were men's focus on socio-economic factors, particularly affordability of drugs, sexual function and lifestyle, while women valued well-being, support in daily life and household activities and had a higher risk-awareness of DM. Irrespective of gender, limited self-care measures were used, and health professionals were consulted about health problems.

    CONCLUSION: Similarities and dissimilarities were found between men and women in beliefs about health and illness that affect self-care practice and healthcare seeking. Underlying living conditions, with different gender roles, appear to determine the beliefs about health and illness, which are based on individual knowledge. Measures to increase knowledge about DM are urgently needed in Uganda. In diabetes care, it is important to search for individual beliefs and consider gender and living conditions.

  • 7.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    University of Lund.
    Immigrants in emergency care: Swedish health care staff's experiences2005In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 52, no 4, p. 276-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: During the past few decades Sweden has developed into a multicultural society. The proportion of patients with different cultural backgrounds increases, which naturally makes new demands on health care staff.

    Aim: To identify whether staff in somatic and psychiatric emergency care experienced problems in the care of migrants, and if so to compare these.

    Method: The study design was explorative. Focus group interviews of 22 women and 13 men working as nurses and assistant nurses at an emergency ward, an ambulance service and a psychiatric intensive care unit were held.

    Findings: The results showed that the main problems experienced in all wards were difficulties related to caring for asylum-seeking refugees. Some dissimilarities were revealed: unexpected behaviours in migrants related to cultural differences described by staff working in the emergency ward; migrants' refusal to eat and drink and their inactive behaviour in the psychiatric ward; and a lot of non-emergency runs by the ambulance staff because of language barriers between the emergency services centre and migrants.

    Conclusion: The main problems experienced by the health care staff were situations in which they were confronted with the need to care for asylum-seeking refugees. Practice implications: These emphasize the importance of support from organizational structures and national policies to develop models for caring for asylum-seeking refugees. Simple routines and facilities to communicate with foreign-language-speaking migrants need to be developed. Health care staff need a deeper understanding of individual needs in the light of migrational and cultural background.

  • 8. Kapborg, I
    et al.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    The phenomenon of caring from the novice student nurse's perspective: A qualitative content analysis2003In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 50, no 3, p. 183-192Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Caring has been seen as a nursing term/concept, including all the aspects that are used to deliver nursing care to patients. Sometimes caring has been conceptualized as a relational expression of human concern and as a collection of human activities that assists others. Aim: This study is to identify and describe the nature of the concept 'caring' from the novice student nurse's perspective. Methods: A total of 127 Swedish novice student nurses wrote comments in essay form to the question: 'what is your image of the concept caring?' Data were analysed using qualitative content analysis, with the use of the theoretical framework: 'doing' and 'being'. Findings: Three categories of caring were identified as 'doing', 'being' and 'professionalism'. The phenomena of caring and the caring process could be illustrated as including hand (doing), heart (being) and brain (professionalism). Conclusions: It is now time to make care more visible as a principle of practice and of moral action. This could be explicit in a clear professional framework and incorporated more fully into nursing education programmes. Caring is to take care of the entire human being physically, emotionally and intellectually. Nurses need to use hand, heart and brain in order to fulfil their commitments.

  • 9.
    Peyrovi, H.
    et al.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran, Doctoral Students' Department, Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Rashid Yasami St., Vali-Asr Ave., Tehran, 19395-4798, Iran.
    Yadavar-Nikravesh, M.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Oskouie, S.F.
    Faculty of Nursing and Midwifery, Iran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Iranian student nurses' experiences of clinical placement2005In: International Nursing Review, ISSN 0020-8132, E-ISSN 1466-7657, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 134-141Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Nursing as a practice-based profession requires that student nurses learn how to become professional in the clinical environment. Many studies have addressed student nurses' clinical learning and related problems, but few have explored the whole clinical experience of being a student nurse. Aim: To understand and gain deeper insight into Iranian student nurses' lived experience of clinical placement. Method: Five student nurses were interviewed about their clinical experience during clinical placement. The researchers analysed the verbatim transcripts using van Manen's phenomenological methodology, keeping in mind the recommended six research activities. Findings: Five themes emerged by which the phenomenon of clinical experience could be illustrated. These themes were: caring-orientated relationships, attractive aspects of clinical experience, finding oneself in the clinical milieu, being supportive to classmates, and actualizing potential. Fourteen subthemes expanded and clarified the meaning of these themes. Conclusion: The attention paid and acknowledgement given to 'caring' and 'knowledge' by the student nurses showed that they are progressing toward their ultimate goal of being professional nurses. The student nurses' awareness of 'what is going on there?' and also support from other significant people facilitates the students' adaptation process and guarantees this progress. © 2005 International Council of Nurses.

1 - 9 of 9
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf