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  • 1.
    Ali, Lilas
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Skarsater, Ingela
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden; Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Caring Situation, Health, Self-efficacy, and Stress in Young Informal Carers of Family and Friends with Mental Illness in Sweden2015In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 407-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study compared the caring situation, health, self-efficacy, and stress of young (16-25) informal carers (YICs) supporting a family member with mental illness with that of YICs supporting a friend. A sample of 225 carers, assigned to a family group (n = 97) or a friend group (n = 128) completed the questionnaire. It was found that the family group experiences a lower level of support and friends experienced a lower positive value of caring. No other differences in health, general self-efficacy and stress were found. YICs endure different social situations, which is why further study of the needs of YICs, especially those supporting friends, is urgently needed.

  • 2.
    Bergqvist, Anette
    et al.
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping.
    Preventing the development of metabolic syndrome in people with psychotic disorders-difficult, but possible: experiences of staff working in psychosis outpatient care in sweden2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 350-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health staffs' experiences of assisting people with psychotic disorders to implement lifestyle changes in an effort to prevent metabolic syndrome. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 health care professionals working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that implementation of lifestyle changes among people with psychotic disorders was experienced as difficult, but possible. The greatest obstacles experienced in this work were difficulties due to the reduction of cognitive functions associated with the disease. Guidelines available to staff in order to help them identify and prevent physical health problems in the group were not always followed and the content was not always relevant. Staff further described feelings of uncertainty about having to motivate people to take anti-psychotic medication while simultaneously being aware of the risks of metabolic deviations. Nursing interventions focusing on organising daily routines before conducting a more active prevention of metabolic syndrome, including information and practical support, were experienced as necessary. The importance of healthy eating and physical activity needs to be communicated in such a way that it is adjusted to the person's cognitive ability, and should be repeated over time, both verbally and in writing. Such efforts, in combination with empathic and seriously committed community-based social support, were experienced as having the best effect over time. Permanent lifestyle changes were experienced as having to be carried out on the patient's terms and in his or her home environment.

  • 3.
    Bergqvist, Anette
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Maria
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Preventing the Development of Metabolic Syndrome in People with Psychotic Disorders—Difficult, but Possible: Experiences of Staff Working in Psychosis Outpatient Care in Sweden2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 350-358Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore mental health staffs’ experiences of assisting people with psychotic disorders to implement lifestyle changes in an effort to prevent metabolic syndrome. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 12 health care professionals working in psychosis outpatient care in Sweden. Data were analysed using a qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate that implementation of lifestyle changes among people with psychotic disorders was experienced as difficult, but possible. The greatest obstacles experienced in this work were difficulties due to the reduction of cognitive functions associated with the disease. Guidelines available to staff in order to help them identify and prevent physical health problems in the group were not always followed and the content was not always relevant. Staff further described feelings of uncertainty about having to motivate people to take anti-psychotic medication while simultaneously being aware of the risks of metabolic deviations. Nursing interventions focusing on organising daily routines before conducting a more active prevention of metabolic syndrome, including information and practical support, were experienced as necessary. The importance of healthy eating and physical activity needs to be communicated in such a way that it is adjusted to the person's cognitive ability, and should be repeated over time, both verbally and in writing. Such efforts, in combination with empathic and seriously committed community-based social support, were experienced as having the best effect over time. Permanent lifestyle changes were experienced as having to be carried out on the patient's terms and in his or her home environment.

  • 4.
    Eivergard, Kristina
    et al.
    Mid Sweden Univ SE, Sweden; Ersta Skondal Bracke Univ Coll, Sweden.
    Enmarker, Ingela
    Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Livholts, Mona
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Alex, Lena
    Umea Univ, Sweden.
    Hellzen, Ove
    Mid Sweden Univ SE, Sweden.
    The Importance of Being Acceptable - Psychiatric Staffs Talk about Women Patients in Forensic Care2019In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 124-132Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Currently, women comprise about ten percent of those sentenced to psychiatric forensic clinics in Sweden. Those who are sentenced to forensic care because of offending and violent behaviour have already taken a step away from the usually expected female behaviour. On the other hand, there are many women in forensic care who have not committed crimes, but who instead self-harm. Studies have identified a gender bias in diagnosing and care in psychiatric settings, but there are few studies conducted on women in forensic care. The present study therefore examined how the situation of women patients and female norms are expressed in the staffs talk about these women during verbal handovers and ward rounds at a forensic clinic in Sweden. The aim was to explore how psychiatric staff, in a context of verbal handovers and ward rounds, talk about women who have been committed to forensic psychiatric care, and what consequences this might have for the care of the patients. The content of speech was examined using audio recordings and a method of analysis that was inspired by thematic analysis. The analysis identified that the staff talked about the women in a way that indicates that they expected the women to follow the rules and take responsibility for their bodies in order to be regarded as acceptable patients.

  • 5.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    County Hospital Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Brenner Blomqvist, Kristina
    Jönköping, University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Health behaviors as conceptualized by individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 9, p. 665-672Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to describe health behaviors as conceptualized by individuals diagnosed with a psychotic disorder. Data were collected by qualitative interviews (n = 20) and were analyzed using phenomenography. Mental well-being took priority over physical health and guided health behaviors. Social relations were significant, and when they proved insufficient, health care professionals were utilized as a substitute. Some relied on religion, complementary treatments, and folk beliefs for health. Interventions not dependent on mental well-being, and assisting individuals to participate in appropriate networks could have advantages. Interventions adapted to the individual's financial situation and cultural values are useful as issues related to these areas can obstruct implementation of health behaviors. Implementing the findings of this study in nursing research and education will prepare nurses to meet the varying health needs of different individuals.

  • 6.
    Jansson, Susanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Perceptions Among Psychiatric Staff of Creating a Therapeutic Alliance With Patients on Community Treatment Orders2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 10, p. 701-707Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A therapeutic alliance with a continuing collaboration between a patient and psychiatric staff is a resource for helping patients cope with the demands of coercive legislation. Knowledge exists describing coercion in inpatient care while the knowledge regarding the perceptions of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on Community Treatment Orders (CTO) among psychiatric staff is scarce. To describe perceptions among psychiatric staff of creating a therapeutic alliance with patients on CTOs, an exploratory design using a phenomenographic method was employed. Thirteen semi-structured audio-taped interviews were conducted with psychiatric staff responsible for patients on CTOs. The staff worked in five different outpatient clinics and the interviews were conducted at their workplaces. The analysis resulted in in four metaphors: the persevering psychiatric staff, the learning psychiatric staff, the participating psychiatric staff, and the motivating psychiatric staff. Patients on CTOs were more time-consuming for psychiatric staff in care and treatment. Long-term planning is required in which the creation of a therapeutic alliance entails the patient gradually gaining greater self-awareness and wanting to visit the outpatient clinic. The professional-patient relationship is essential and if a therapeutic alliance is not created, the patients continued care and treatment in the community is vulnerable.

  • 7.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Psykiatriska kliniken, Länssjukhuset Ryhov, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Prerequisites for a healthy lifestyle - experiences of persons with psychosis2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 602-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore prerequisites for a healthy lifestyle as described by individuals diagnosed with psychosis. Forty participants who had performed a lifestyle intervention focusing on physical activities and lifestyle education were interviewed. Conventional content analysis was used. The results are described in two categories: (1) Individual Prerequisites and (2) Being a Part of Society. The individuals said that they got stuck in a state of planning without taking action. It was pointless to make a bigger effort because the psychotic disorder could, at any time, worsen the prerequisites. They also said that they wanted to live like everybody else and therefore tried to adopt a normal lifestyle. Future interventions or professional support by mental health nurses and other health care givers should target the transition from planning to action to achieve a healthy lifestyle, and should help the individual to taking part in society.

  • 8.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margaretha
    Linköping University.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Solid Mechanics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Prerequisites for A Healthy Lifestyle: Experiences of Persons with Psychosis2013In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 602-610Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study is to explore prerequisites for a healthy lifestyle as described by individuals diagnosed with psychosis. Forty participants who had performed a lifestyle intervention focusing on physical activities and lifestyle education were interviewed. Conventional content analysis was used. The results are described in two categories: (1) Individual Prerequisites and (2) Being a Part of Society. The individuals said that they got stuck in a state of planning without taking action. It was pointless to make a bigger effort because the psychotic disorder could, at any time, worsen the prerequisites. They also said that they wanted to live like everybody else and therefore tried to adopt a normal lifestyle. Future interventions or professional support by mental health nurses and other health care givers should target the transition from planning to action to achieve a healthy lifestyle, and should help the individual to taking part in society.

  • 9.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Foldemo, Anniqa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    Psychiatric Clinic, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden / School of Health and Welfare, University of Jönköping; Sweden.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An intervention with physical activity and lifestyle counseling improves health-related quality of life and shows small improvements in metabolic risk factors in persons with psychosis2016In: Issues in Mental Health Nursing, ISSN 0161-2840, E-ISSN 1096-4673, Vol. 37, no 1, p. 43-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    General purpose: To study the effects of a lifestyle intervention on health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and metabolic risk factors in persons with psychosis.

    Methodology: A longitudinal intervention study with a matched reference sample.

    Results: HRQoL measured by the EQ-VAS improved from 57.6 to 63.3 (17.8) in the intervention group (p=0.05). The HDL cholesterol concentration increased from 1.03 to 1.11 (0.19) mmol/l in the intervention group (p=0.02). There was no significant change in body weight.

    Conclusion: A lifestyle intervention based on group meetings improves HRQoL in patients with psychosis. There are also small improvements in metabolic risk factors.

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