liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Allemann, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Sue and Bill Gross School of Nursing, University of California Irvine, USA.
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Perceived Social Support in Persons With Heart Failure Living With an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator: A Cross-sectional Explorative Study2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. E1-E8Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The links between chronic illness, psychological well-being, and social support have previously been established. Social isolation and loneliness have shown an increased mortality risk for those with heart failure (HF). Increasingly more people with HF are living with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD), but only a few small-scale studies have focused on social support in this population.

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to explore factors related to perceived social support in a large cohort of individuals with HF living with an ICD.

    METHODS: All eligible adult ICD recipients in the Swedish ICD registry were invited to participate in this cross-sectional study. For this analysis, those with HF and complete data on perceived social support were included (N = 1550; age, 67.3 (SD, 9.8) years; 19.5% female).

    RESULTS: Most reported a high level of social support, but 18% did not. In logistic regression, living alone was the greatest predictor of low/medium support. Lower social support for those living alone was associated with poorer perceived health status, having symptoms of depression, and experiencing low perceived control. For those living with someone, lower support was associated with female gender, symptoms of depression and anxiety, and less control. Heart failure status and perceived symptom severity were not related to the outcome.

    CONCLUSION: One in five participants reported low/medium social support. Our study underlines the complex relationships between perceived social support, psychological well-being and perceived control over the heart condition. Multiple aspects need to be taken into account when developing interventions to provide psychosocial support and optimize outcomes in this patient group.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-01 11:28
  • 2.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Centre for Clinical Research Sörmland, Uppsala University, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Chung, Misook L
    College of Nursing, University of Kentucky, Lexington, USA.
    Hjelm, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus University, Kalmar, Kalmar County Hospital, Kalmar Sweden.
    Depressive Symptoms Moderate the Association Between Appetite and Health Status in Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E15-E20Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Decreased appetite and depressive symptoms are clinical problems in patients with heart failure. Both may result in impaired health status.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study were to investigate the association between appetite and health status in patients with heart failure and to explore whether depressive symptoms moderate this association.

    METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, patients with heart failure (n = 186; mean age, 71 years), New York Heart Association class II to IV, participated. Data on appetite (Council of Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire), depressive symptoms (Patient Health Questionnaire-9), and health status (EQ-5D 3-level scale [EQ-5D-3L] descriptive system, EQ-5D-3L index, and EQ Visual Analog Scale) were collected by self-rating questionnaires. Pearson correlation was used to investigate the association between appetite and health status. Multiple regression was performed to examine whether depressive symptoms moderate the association between appetite and health status.

    RESULTS: There was a significant association between appetite and health status for EQ-5D-3L descriptive system, mobility (P < .001), pain/discomfort (P < .001), and anxiety/depression (P < .001). This association was also shown in EQ-5D-3L index (P < .001) and EQ Visual Analog Scale (P < .001). Simple slope analysis showed that the association between appetite and health status was only significant for patients without depressive symptoms (B = 0.32, t = 4.66, P < .001).

    CONCLUSIONS: Higher level of appetite was associated with better health status. In moderation analysis, the association was presented for patients without depressive symptoms. Decreased appetite is an important sign of poor health status. To improve health status, health professionals should have greater attention on appetite, as well on signs of depressive symptoms.

  • 3. Annema, Coby
    et al.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Do patients with heart failure need a case manager?2009In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 127-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of patients with heart failure (HF) is complex and often benefits from a patient-tailored approach. Since the early 1990s, HF disease management programs have been developed and implemented to improve outcomes of patients with HF. The body of evidence of the effectiveness of these programs is still growing, but meta-analyses of disease management program studies show various results on outcomes. This raises questions regarding the optimal organizational structure and components of a most cost-effective HF management program. Case management has been described as a solution to improve outcomes in complex patients and as a possible link to effective disease management. This raises the question of what case management can add to the disease management of patients with HF and which patients might benefit. The aim of this article is to discuss the potential contribution of case management in the disease management of patients with HF.

  • 4.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hübbert, Laila
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jakobsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pulmonary Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effects of long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment in patients with severe heart failure2005In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 385-396Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) is common in patients with heart failure (HF) and leads to disturbed sleep. The objective of this study was to determine the persistent effects of long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment in patients with severe HF regarding (1) objective outcomes, such as sleep, SDB, cardiac function, and functional capacity; (2) subjective outcomes, such as self-assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life (HRQOL); and (3) the relationship between objective and subjective outcomes. In this open nonrandomized experimental study, 22 patients, median age 71 years, with severe HF were studied before and after 3 months of receiving nocturnal oxygen. The measures used were overnight polysomnography, echocardiography, 6-minute walk test, self-assessed sleep difficulties (Uppsala Sleep Inventory-HF), daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale), and HRQOL (36-Item Short Form Health Survey and Minnesota Living with Heart Failure Questionnaire). SDB, with a 90% dominance of central sleep apnea, occurred in 41% of the patients with severe HF before intervention. After intervention, functional capacity improved for both the whole group of patients with HF (P < .01) and HF patients with SDB (P < .05). No improvements regarding cardiac function, objective sleep, subjective sleep, or SDB were seen, except for a decrease of > or = 4% desaturations (P < .05). HRQOL did not differ significantly between HF patients with and without SDB before or after intervention with nocturnal oxygen. Long-term nocturnal oxygen treatment improved functional capacity in patients with severe HF, with or without SDB. No improvements were seen regarding sleep, daytime sleepiness, SDB, cardiac function, or HRQOL.

  • 5.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Department of Nursing, Lund University, Lund, Sweden and School of Social and Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and health-related quality of life in patients with chronic heart failure2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 234-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Normal sleep changes with age in duration, fragmentation, and depth. The prevalence of insomnia is high in the elderly general population. In patients with chronic heart failure (HF) objective sleep assessments have shown disturbances such as a shorter total duration of sleep, frequent arousals, and sleep stage changes.

    OBJECTIVE:

    To describe self-assessed sleep difficulties, daytime sleepiness, and their relation to health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in men and women with HF, as well as to make a comparison to data from a norm population.

    METHODS:

    Cross-sectional design including 223 patients with HF, New York Heart Association classification II-IV, assessed using the Uppsala Sleep Inventory-Chronic Heart Failure, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey, and Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire.

    RESULTS:

    The most commonly reported sleep difficulties were initiating and maintaining sleep. The ratio of habitual sleep to the amount of estimated need for sleep was significantly shorter for women (P < .05), and the number of awakenings per night was significantly increased for men (P < .001). A total of 21% suffered from daytime sleepiness. Patients suffering from difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings reported significantly lower HRQOL in almost all dimensions of the SF-36 (P < .05-P < .001) compared to patients without sleeping difficulties, as well as to the normal population. The disease-specific Minnesota Living With Heart Failure Questionnaire showed significantly reduced (P < .05-P < .001) HRQOL as measured by the total and subscale scores for patients suffering from sleeping difficulties compared to patients without sleeping difficulties.

    CONCLUSION:

    Patients with HF have a reduced HRQOL especially if difficulties maintaining sleep, initiating sleep, and early morning awakenings are involved.

  • 6.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Department of Nursing, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Wahlin, Ake
    Institute of Gerontology, School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Johansson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine.
    Sex-Specific Associations Between Self-reported Sleep Duration, Cardiovascular Disease, Hypertension, and Mortality in an Elderly Population.2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. 422-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Both short and long sleep durations have been associated to increased mortality. Knowledge about sex-specific differences among elderly regarding associations between sleep duration, cardiovascular health, and mortality is sparse.

    OBJECTIVE: The aims of this study are to examine the association between self-reported sleep duration and mortality and to investigate whether this association is sex specific and/or moderated by cardiovascular morbidity, and also to explore potential mediators of sleep duration effects on mortality.

    METHODS: A population-based, observational, cross-sectional design with 6-year follow-up with mortality as primary outcome was conducted. Self-rated sleep duration, clinical examinations, echocardiography, and blood samples (N-terminal fragment of proBNP) were collected. A total of 675 persons (50% women; mean age, 78 years) were divided into short sleepers (≤6 hours; n = 231), normal sleepers (7-8 hours; n = 338), and long sleepers (≥9 hours; n = 61). Data were subjected to principal component analyses. Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and hypertension factors were extracted and used as moderators and as mediators in the regression analyses.

    RESULTS: During follow-up, 55 short sleepers (24%), 68 normal sleepers (20%), and 21 long sleepers (34%) died. Mediator analyses showed that long sleep was associated with mortality in men (hazard ratio [HR], 1.8; P = .049), independently of CVD and hypertension. In men with short sleep, CVD acted as a moderator of the association with mortality (HR, 4.1; P = .025). However, when using N-terminal fragment of proBNP, this effect became nonsignificant (HR, 3.1; P = .06). In woman, a trend to moderation involving the hypertension factor and short sleep was found (HR, 4.6; P = .09).

    CONCLUSION: Short and long sleep duration may be seen as risk markers, particularly among older men with cardiovascular morbidity.

  • 7.
    Brännström, Margareta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Umeå University, Skellefteå, Sweden .
    Kristofferzon, Marja-Leena
    University of Gävle, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Ivarsson, Bodil
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden .
    Nilsson, Ulrica G.
    University of Örebro, Sweden .
    Svedberg, Petra
    Halmstad University, Sweden .
    Thylén, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Sexual Knowledge in Patients With a Myocardial Infarction and Their Partners2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 332-339Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Sexual health and sexual activity are important elements of an individual's well-being. For couples, this topic is often affected after a myocardial infarction (MI). It has become increasingly clear that, after an MI, patients are insufficiently educated on how to resume normal sexual activity. However, sufficient data on the general knowledge that patients and partners have about sexual activity and MI are lacking.

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aims of this study were to explore and compare patients' and partners' sexual knowledge 1 month after a first MI and 1 year after the event and to compare whether the individual knowledge had changed over time. A second aim was to investigate whether patients and their partners report receiving information about sexual health and sexual activity from healthcare professionals during the first year after the event and how this information was perceived.

    SUBJECTS AND METHODS:

    This descriptive, comparative survey study enrolled participants from 13 Swedish hospitals in 2007-2009. A total of 115 patients with a first MI and their partners answered the Sex After MI Knowledge Test questionnaire 1 month after the MI and 1 year after the event. Correct responses generated a maximum score of 75.

    RESULTS:

    Only 41% of patients and 31% of partners stated that they had received information on sex and relationships at the 1 year follow-up. The patients scored 51 ± 10 on the Sex After MI Knowledge Test at inclusion into the study, compared with the 52 ± 10 score for the partners. At the 1-year follow-up, the patients' knowledge had significantly increased to a score of 55 ± 7, but the partners' knowledge did not significantly change (53 ± 10).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    First MI patients and their partners reported receiving limited information about sexual issues during the cardiac rehabilitation and had limited knowledge about sexual health and sexual activity.

  • 8.
    DEath, Maureen
    et al.
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Byrne, Molly
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Murphy, Patrick
    Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland; Trinity Coll Dublin, Ireland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    McSharry, Jenny
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Murphy, Andrew W.
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Doherty, Sally
    Royal Coll Surgeons Ireland, Ireland.
    Noone, Chris
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Casey, Dympna
    Natl Univ Ireland, Ireland.
    Participants Experiences of a Sexual Counseling Intervention During Cardiac Rehabilitation A Nested Qualitative Study Within the CHARMS Pilot Randomized Controlled Trial2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 5, p. E35-E45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: International guidelines recommend sexual assessment and counseling be offered to all patients with cardiovascular disease during cardiac rehabilitation. However, sexual problems are infrequently addressed. The Cardiac Health and Relationship Management and Sexuality (CHARMS) intervention is a complex, multilevel intervention designed to increase the provision of sexual counseling in cardiac rehabilitation. It was piloted in 2 cardiac rehabilitation centers to assess the acceptability and feasibility of the intervention and to inform and refine a definitive cluster randomized controlled trial protocol. Objectives: The aim of this study was to explore the experiences, perceptions, and opinions of patients, partners, and cardiac rehabilitation staff who participated in the CHARMS staff-led patient education class. Methods: A qualitative, descriptive study using semistructured interviews to collect the data. Cardiac rehabilitation staff (n = 8) were interviewed when the intervention commenced in their center and 3 months later (n = 6). Patients (n = 19) and partners (n = 2) were interviewed after delivery of the class; 7 were interviewed again 3 months postintervention to explore temporal changes in opinions. Results: Most cardiac rehabilitation staff were comfortable delivering the CHARMS intervention but would prefer a less structured format. Some staff perceived discomfort among patients. Few patients reported discomfort. Most patients and partners considered that the intervention was a welcome and acceptable part of a cardiac rehabilitation program. Conclusion: Incorporating sexual counseling into cardiac rehabilitation programs is feasible. Although the views of the patients and staff diverged on a number of issues including the perceived comfort of patients, its inclusion was welcomed by patients and was acceptable overall to both staff and patients.

  • 9.
    Deaton, Christi
    et al.
    University Manchester, Sch Nursing Midwifery and Social Work, Manchester M20 3RA, Lancs, England.
    Sivarajan Froelicher, Erika
    University Calif San Francisco, Sch Med, Sch Nursing and Epidemiol and Biostat, San Francisco, CA USA.
    Har Wu, Lai
    Hong Kong Polytech University, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Ho, Camille
    Hong Kong Adventist Hospital, Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Shishani, Kawkab
    Washington State University, Coll Nursing, Spokane, WA USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Global Burden of Cardiovascular Disease2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 4, p. S5-S14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) today is responsible for approximately one-third of deaths worldwide, and that figure will surely increase in both developing and developed countries as risk factors for the disease-primarily dyslipidemia, hypertension, obesity, diabetes, physical inactivity, poor diet, and smoking-continue to increase. Although these risk factors are modifiable, to date there is a relative paucity of measures to prevent or control them, particularly in developing countries. A population strategy combined with a high-risk strategy for CVD prevention could greatly reduce the burden of disease in the coming decades. Many initiatives are working, but many more are needed. This chapter provides background on the global burden of CVD and provides the context for the subsequent chapters addressing nurses roles in reversing the bleak predictions for the ravages of CVD if risk factors are left unchecked in the coming decades.

  • 10.
    Dontje, Manon L
    et al.
    Hanze University of Applied Sciences and University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
    van der Wal, Martje H L
    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Stolk, Ronald P
    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Brügemann, Johan
    University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijtvliet, Petra E P J
    Martini Hospital Groningen, the Netherlands.
    van der Schans, Cees P
    Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    de Greef, Mathieu H G
    Institute of Human Movement Sciences, University of Groningen and Hanze University of Applied Sciences, Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Daily Physical Activity in Stable Heart Failure Patients2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 218-226Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:: Physical activity is the only nonpharmacological therapy that is proven to be effective in heart failure (HF) patients in reducing morbidity. To date, little is known about the levels of daily physical activity in HF patients and about related factors.

    OBJECTIVE:: The objectives of this study were to (a) describe performance-based daily physical activity in HF patients, (b) compare it with physical activity guidelines, and (c) identify related factors of daily physical activity.

    METHODS:: The daily physical activity of 68 HF patients was measured using an accelerometer (SenseWear) for 48 hours. Psychological characteristics (self-efficacy, motivation, and depression) were measured using questionnaires. To have an indication how to interpret daily physical activity levels of the study sample, time spent on moderate- to vigorous-intensity physical activities was compared with the 30-minute activity guideline. Steps per day was compared with the criteria for healthy adults, in the absence of HF-specific criteria. Linear regression analyses were used to identify related factors of daily physical activity.

    RESULTS:: Forty-four percent were active for less than 30 min/d, whereas 56% were active for more than 30 min/d. Fifty percent took fewer than 5000 steps per day, 35% took 5000 to 10 000 steps per day, and 15% took more than 10 000 steps per day. Linear regression models showed that New York Heart Association classification and self-efficacy were the most important factors explaining variance in daily physical activity.

    CONCLUSIONS:: The variance in daily physical activity in HF patients is considerable. Approximately half of the patients had a sedentary lifestyle. Higher New York Heart Association classification and lower self-efficacy are associated with less daily physical activity. These findings contribute to the understanding of daily physical activity behavior of HF patients and can help healthcare providers to promote daily physical activity in sedentary HF patients.

  • 11.
    Elfström, Maria
    et al.
    Jönköping University.
    Karlsson, Susanne
    Jönköping University.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Decisive Situations Affecting Partners Support to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure-Treated Patients With Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome A Critical Incident Technique Analysis of the Initial Treatment Phase2012In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 228-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Research Objective: Effective treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) can reduce morbidity and mortality, but adherence rates are low. The partner has an important role in supporting the patient, but this role may be adversely affected by difficulties during the early phase of the CPAP initiation. The aim of this study was to explore and describe decisive situations affecting partners support to patients with OSAS and how the partners manage these situations during the initial phase of CPAP treatment. Subjects and Methods: A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was used. A total of 542 decisive situations affecting partners support and 222 situations describing managing were collected by means of interviews with 25 strategically selected partners of patients with CPAP treated OSAS. Results: Adverse effects, limited effect, practical and psychosocial problems, limited presence, and inappropriate initiation emerged as negative influences on the partners support. A well-functioning treatment, improvements, high motivation, and receiving support from others were identified as positive influences on the partners support. The partner managed the situations by letting the patient handle the CPAP treatment by himself/herself, by handling the treatment together with the patient, or taking over the handling of CPAP treatment. Conclusion: Increased knowledge about the different situations that affect the partners support negatively or positively and how these situations are managed by partners can be used in educational situations involving both patients and partners during CPAP initiation.

  • 12.
    Evangelista, Lorraine S.
    et al.
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Cacciata, Marysol
    Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Dracup, Kathleen
    Univ Calif San Francisco, CA 94143 USA.
    Dose-Response Relationship Between Exercise Intensity, Mood States, and Quality of Life in Patients With Heart Failure2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 6, p. 530-537Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: We conducted a secondary analysis to (1) compare changes in mood disorders and quality of life (QOL) among 4 groups of patients with heart failure in a home-based exercise program who had varying degrees of change in their exercise capacity and (2) determine whether there was an association between exercise capacity, mood disorders, and QOL. Methods: Seventy-one patients were divided into 4 groups based on changes in exercise capacity from baseline to 6 months: group 1showed improvements of greater than 10% (n = 19), group 2 showed improvements of 10% or less (n = 16), group 3 showed reductions of 10% or less (n = 9), and group 4 showed reductions of greater than 10% (n = 27). Results: Over time, patients in all 4 groups demonstrated significantly lower levels of depression and hostility (P amp;lt; .001) and higher levels of physical and overall quality of life (P = .046). Group differences over time were noted in anxiety (P = .009), depression (P = .015), physical quality of life (P amp;lt; .001), and overall quality of life (P = .002). Greater improvement in exercise capacity was strongly associated with lower depression scores (r = -0.49, P = .01). Conclusions: An improvement in exercise capacity with exercise training was associated with a decrease in depression and anxiety and an increase in QOL in patients with heart failure.

  • 13.
    Gallagher, Robyn
    et al.
    University of Technology, Sydney.
    Luttik, Marie-Louise
    University of Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Social Support and Self-care in Heart Failure2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 439-445Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE:: Self-care by heart failure (HF) patients is essential for optimal disease management of their condition. However, as the nature of HF is unrelenting and burdensome, self-care is usually achieved with the support of partners. It is not clear what role the level of social support by partners plays in HF self-care; therefore, this study sets out to determine the types of social support provided to HF patients and the impact of differing levels of social support on HF patients' self-care. SUBJECTS AND METHOD:: This is secondary analysis of a subgroup of patients experiencing their second hospital admission for HF at baseline in the COACH study, a multisite trial conducted in the Netherlands. Measures included the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale and a multiple component assessment of social support, which categorized patients into low, moderate, and high levels of social support according to the presence of a partner and their perception of support they received from their partner. RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:: Patients (n = 333) had an average age of 72 (SD, 11) years, and 92% belonged to New York Heart Association class III or greater. Of the patients with partners (56%), only 49% had a high level of support from their partner. No demographic or clinical characteristic was associated with self-care behavior. Patients with a high level of support reported significantly better self-care (P = .002) than patients with low or moderate levels of social support. Patients with a high level of social support reported being significantly more likely to consult with a health professional for weight gain (P = .011), to limit the amount of fluids they have (P = .02), take their medication (P = .017), to get a flu shot (P = .001), and to exercise on a regular basis (P < .001) than those with medium or low levels of social support. The presence of social support by a partner is not sufficient to influence HF patients' self-care. Social support provided by partners needs to be of a quality and content that matches HF patients' perception of need to influence self-care. Caregivers, especially partners, should be considered as integral in the treatment and care of HF patients.

  • 14.
    Hill, Loreena
    et al.
    Queens Univ, North Ireland.
    McIlfatrick, Sonja
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland; All Ireland Inst Hosp and Palliat Care, Ireland.
    Taylor, Brian J.
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Mary MacKillop Inst Hlth Res, Australia.
    Moser, Debra
    Univ Kentucky, KY USA; Univ Kentucky, KY USA.
    Slater, Paul
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    McAloon, Toni
    Ulster Univ, North Ireland.
    Dixon, Lana
    Belfast Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    Donnelly, Patrick
    South Eastern Hlth and Social Care Trust, North Ireland.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Fitzsimons, Donna
    Queens Univ, North Ireland; All Ireland Inst Hosp and Palliat Care, Ireland.
    Patient and Professional Factors That Impact the Perceived Likelihood and Confidence of Healthcare Professionals to Discuss Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator Deactivation in Advanced Heart Failure Results From an International Factorial Survey2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 527-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rate of implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) implantations is increasing in patients with advanced heart failure. Despite clear guideline recommendations, discussions addressing deactivation occur infrequently. Aim: The aim of this article is to explore patient and professional factors that impact perceived likelihood and confidence of healthcare professionals to discuss ICD deactivation. Methods and Results: Between 2015 and 2016, an international sample of 262 healthcare professionals (65% nursing, 24% medical) completed an online factorial survey, encompassing a demographic questionnaire and clinical vignettes. Each vignette had 9 randomly manipulated and embedded patient-related factors, considered as independent variables, providing 1572 unique vignettes for analysis. These factors were determined through synthesis of a systematic literature review, a retrospective case note review, and a qualitative exploratory study. Results showed that most healthcare professionals agreed that deactivation discussions should be initiated by a cardiologist (95%, n = 255) or a specialist nurse (81%, n = 215). In terms of experience, 84% of cardiologists (n = 53) but only 30% of nurses (n = 50) had previously been involved in a deactivation decision. Healthcare professionals valued patient involvement in deactivation decisions; however, only 50% (n = 130) actively involved family members. Five of 9 clinical factors were associated with an increased likelihood to discuss deactivation including advanced age, severe heart failure, presence of malignancy, receipt of multiple ICD shocks, and more than 3 hospital admissions during the previous year. Furthermore, nationality and discipline significantly influenced likelihood and confidence in decision making. Conclusions: Guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals discuss ICD deactivation; however, practice is suboptimal with multifactorial factors impacting on decision making. The role and responsibility of nurses in discussing deactivation require clarity and improvement.

  • 15.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University.
    Dahl, Anna
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    Department of Psychology, University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Factors Associated With Increased Risk for Dementia in Individuals Age 80 Years or Older With Congestive Heart Failure2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 82-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND AND RESEARCH OBJECTIVE:: An increasing body of evidence shows that individuals diagnosed with congestive heart failure (CHF) are at a higher risk for dementia. However, the prevalence rate of dementia among persons with CHF in very old individuals has not been previously reported, and little is known about the comorbidities that place old persons with CHF at a higher risk for dementia. The aim of this study was to compare the prevalence of dementia in individuals 80 years or older who have CHF with that in individuals without CHF and to identify factors related to dementia in individuals diagnosed with CHF.

    METHODS:: A total of 702 participants from a Swedish population-based longitudinal study (Octogenerian Twin) were included. The group consisted of same-sex twin pairs, age 80 years or older, and 138 participants had CHF. Dementia was diagnosed according to criteria in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Third Edition, Revised. Generalized estimating equations including gender, age and educational level, waist circumference, diabetes, hypertension, smoking, depression, and blood values were used in a case-control analysis.

    RESULTS:: Individuals with CHF had a significantly higher prevalence of vascular dementia, 16% vs 6% (P < 0.001), and of all types of dementia, 40% vs 30% (P < 0.01), than those not diagnosed with CHF. The generalized estimating equation models showed that depression, hypertension, and/or increased levels of homocysteine were all associated with a higher risk for dementia in individuals with CHF. Diabetes was specifically associated with an increased risk for vascular dementia.

    CONCLUSIONS:: The prevalence of dementia was higher among individuals with CHF than in those without CHF. Diabetes, depression, and hypertension in patients with CHF require special attention from healthcare professionals because these conditions are associated with an elevated risk for dementia. Higher levels of homocysteine were also found to be a marker of dementia in patients with CHF. Further research is needed to identify the factors related to dementia in individuals 80 years or older diagnosed with CHF.

  • 16.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The meaning of quality of life among patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2004In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 243-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Living with a genetic predisposition to disease may influence quality of life. The presence of premature disease can lead to an increased focus on family history and genetic predisposition.

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe quality of life in patients with the genetic disease, familial hypercholesterolemia, who are at an increased risk of premature coronary heart disease.

    Methods: Interviews from 12 adult patients with FH were analyzed using constant comparative analysis. The findings of this qualitative study revealed that for patients, quality of life was equated with harmony in life, the core category. Attaining harmony in life presumes satisfaction and togetherness. Cognizance of the threat of coronary heart disease and impending mortality is balanced by the support of togetherness and satisfaction that builds harmony in life.

    Conclusion: When caring for patients with familial hypercholesterolemia, it is important to meet each patient on his or her own level, and to support balance and their choices for maintaining or regaining harmony in life.

  • 17.
    Hollman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Olsson, Anders
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine.
    Disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia2006In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 21, no 2, p. 103-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is one of the most common genetic metabolic disorders and is associated with a high risk of premature coronary heart disease. Primary prevention directed at lifestyle changes, combined with preventive medical treatment, is the most important way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease in individuals with FH. Knowledge about the condition and adherence to drug treatment may facilitate reaching treatment goals. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe disease knowledge and adherence to treatment in patients with FH. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: Seventy-four patients, more than 18 years of age, with FH were asked to participate. A questionnaire on disease knowledge about FH and adherence to drug treatment was sent to the patients. Response rate was 92% (n = 68). Drug treatment, laboratory results, blood pressure, and smoking were also documented. RESULTS: Most patients knew about cholesterol, prevention, and the reason for drug treatment but were less informed about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. No significant correlation was found between knowledge and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. A significant, negative correlation between adherence and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was found (r = -.354, P < .01). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with FH had scant understanding about the risk of genetic transmission and family history. High adherence to drug prescription has significant correlation to low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level. © 2006 Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, Inc.

  • 18. Jaarsma, Tiny
    Foreword: addressing sexual function in cardiac patients2010In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 149-50Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 19.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Australian Catholic University, Australia.
    Riegel, Barbara
    Australian Catholic University, Australia; University of Penn, PA 19104 USA.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. University of Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Reporting on Self-care in Research Studies Guidance to Improve Knowledge Building2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 315-316Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 20.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinke, Elaine
    Wichita State University, KS, USA .
    20 Things You Didnt Know About Sex and Heart Disease2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 207-208Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 21. Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Steinke, Elaine E
    Gianotten, Woet L
    Sexual problems in cardiac patients: how to assess, when to refer.2010In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 25, no 2, p. 159-64Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is increasingly realized that discussing sexuality is an important issue in the holistic care for cardiac patients. In this review article, the conditions of a good assessment of sexual problems are identified such as creating an appropriate environment, ensuring confidentiality, and using appropriate language. Second, we present different styles and approaches that can be used to start the assessment, differing between settings, persons, or disciplines. The PLISSIT (permission, limited information, specific suggestion, and intensive therapy) model can be helpful to initiate discussion about sexuality with the cardiac patient and his/her partner. This model is a stepwise approach using various levels of discussion or treatment. Open-ended question can facilitate discussion about sexual concerns, and validated questionnaires or diaries can be used to assess sexual problems. Patients with sexual concerns and problems should be counseled and/or treated appropriately, and adequate follow-up is needed. Additional training and research are needed to further improve the quality of sexual assessment and counseling in cardiac patients.

  • 22.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    20 Things You Didn't Know About European Cardiac Nurses2014In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 291-292Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 23.
    Johansson, Ingela
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Experiences of Driving and Driving Restrictions in Recipients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator - The Patient Perspective2010In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 5, p. E1-E10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Objectives: The implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) is a lifesaving device for treating patients who have experienced (secondary prevention), or are likely to experience (primary prevention), sudden cardiac death due to ventricular arrhythmias. Individuals with an ICD are prohibited from driving for a restricted period after the implantation and after recurrence of a ventricular arrhythmia, which may affect the ICD recipient in daily life. The aim of this study was therefore to describe how ICD recipients perceive driving and the driving restriction.

     

    Methods: Fourteen men and 6 women, aged 43 to 82 years, with driving restrictions due to both secondary and primary ICD indications, were interviewed. Data were analyzed using phenomenography.

     

    Results: The analysis resulted in the main category, the individual's unique relationship to driving, based on the categories: (1) achieving adherence on driving restrictions, (2) emotional influence of driving restriction, and (3) altered views on driving. The information was sometimes conceived as insufficient and unclear, and the willingness to accept the restriction differed. The ICD recipients perceived a loss of independence and changed self-image. Some patients had changed their driving behavior because of uncertainty of their driving abilities or fear of having arrhythmias/shocks while driving. They had different views on their future driving.

     

    Conclusions: Handling driving restrictions after ICD implantation and shocks is a complex and delicate issue in clinical practice and should be addressed in a dialogue with the ICD recipient. More individualized and structured information and support should be given according to the ICD recipients' experiences and needs.

  • 24.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Sanderman, Robbert
    Health Psychology Section, Department of Health Sciences, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The Course of Sleep Problems in Patients With Heart Failure and Associations to Rehospitalizations.2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 403-410Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Sleep problems are common in patients with heart failure (HF) and might be associated with patient outcomes.

    AIMS: The aim of this study was to describe the course of sleep problems in HF patients over 1 year and the association between sleep problems and rehospitalization.

    METHODS: Data from 499 HF patients (mean age, 70 years) were used in this analysis. Sleep problems were assessed with the item "Was your sleep restless" from the Center for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale during hospitalization for HF (baseline) and after 1 year.

    RESULTS: A total of 43% of patients (n = 215) reported sleep problems at baseline, and 21% of patients (n = 105), after 1 year. Among the 215 patients with problems with sleep at baseline, 30% (n = 65) continued to have sleep problems over time. Among the 284 patients without sleep problems at baseline, 14% (n = 40) reported sleep problems after 1 year. After adjustments for potential cofounders, patients with continued sleep problems had an almost 2-fold increased risk for all-cause hospitalizations (hazard ratio, 2.1; P = .002) and cardiovascular hospitalizations (hazard ratio, 2.2; P = .004).

    CONCLUSION: One-third of HF patients with sleep problems at discharge experienced persistent sleep problems at follow-up. Continued sleep problems were associated with all-cause and cardiovascular rehospitalizations.

  • 25.
    Kolbe, Nina
    et al.
    University of Appl Science, Switzerland.
    Kugler, Christiane
    University of Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Schnepp, Wilfried
    University of Witten Herdecke, Germany.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sexual Counseling in Patients With Heart Failure A Silent Phenomenon: Results From a Convergent Parallel Mixed Method Study2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 53-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with heart failure (HF) often worry about resuming sexual activity and may need information. Nurses have a role in helping patients to live with the consequences of HF and can be expected to discuss patients sexual concerns. Objective: The aims of this study were to identify whether nurses discuss consequences of HF on sexuality with patients and to explore their perceived role and barriers regarding this topic. Methods: A cross-sectional research design with a convergent parallel mixed method approach was used combining qualitative and quantitative data collected with a self-reported questionnaire. Results: Nurses in this study rarely addressed sexual issues with their patients. The nurses did not feel that discussing sexual concerns with their patients was their responsibility, and only 8% of the nurses expressed confidence to do so. The main phenomenon in discussing sexual concerns seems to be one of silence: Neither patients nor nurses talk about sexual concerns. Factors influencing this include structural barriers, lack of knowledge and communication skills, as well as relevance of the topic and relationship to patients. Conclusion: Cardiac nurses in Germany rarely practice sexual counseling. It is a phenomenon that is silent. Education and skill-based training might hold potential to break the silence.

  • 26.
    Lin, Chung-Ying
    et al.
    Hong Kong Univ Sci and Technol, Peoples R China.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Brostrom, Anders
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. ACU, Australia.
    Martensson, Jan
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Psychometric Properties of the 9-item European Heart Failure Self-care Behavior Scale Using Confirmatory Factor Analysis and Rasch Analysis Among Iranian Patients2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 281-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The 9-item European Heart Failure Self-Care Behavior scale (EHFScB-9) is a self-reported questionnaire commonly used to capture the self-care behavior of people with heart failure (HF). Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the EHFScB-9s factorial structure and categorical functioning of the response scale and differential item functioning (DIF) across subpopulations in Iran. Methods: Patients with HF (n = 380; 60.5% male; mean [SD] age, 61.7 [9.1] years) participated in this study. The median (interquartile range) of the duration of their HF was 6.0 (2.4-8.8) months. Most of the participants were in New York Heart Association classification II (NYHA II, 61.8%); few of them had left ventricular ejection fraction assessment (11.3%). All participants completed the EHFScB-9. Confirmatory factor analysis was used to test the factorial structure of the EHFScB-9; Rasch analysis was used to analyze categorical functioning and DIF items across 2 characteristics (gender and NYHA). Results: The 2-factor structure ("adherence to regimen" and "consulting behavior") of the EHFSCB-9 was confirmed, and the unidimensionality of each factor was found. Categorical functioning was supported for all items. No items displayed substantial DIF across gender (DIF contrast, -0.25-0.31). Except for item 3 ("Contact doctor or nurse if legstfeet are swollen"; DIF contrast, -0.69), no items displayed substantial DIF across NYHA classes (DIF contrast, -0.40 to 0.47). Conclusions: Despite the DIF displayed in 1 item across the NYHA classes, the EHFScB-9 demonstrated sound psychometric properties in patients with HF.

  • 27. Luttik, Marie Louise
    et al.
    Blaauwbroek, Amarins
    Dijker, Anton
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Living with heart failure: partner perspectives.2007In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 131-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To preserve the supportive capabilities of partners of heart failure (HF) patients, it is necessary to gain insight in the experiences and potential needs of these partners. Thirteen partners of HF patients participated in semistructured interviews specifically focused on their experiences as a partner. Patients had had HF for at least 18 months, and their partners were interviewed at home without the patient being present. Content analysis was used to organize the data and to identify categories and themes. Partners of HF patients experience several changes in life as reflected in the main themes: changes in life, changes in relationship, coping, and support. Partners support patients in their daily activities; they often change their own daily schedule and have to adjust joint activities. Regaining a new balance together is one of the challenges that couples face when confronted with HF. Anxiety is an important theme especially in the acute phase that can interfere with adequate coping strategies. Changes in relationship are related to difficulties in communication and sexuality. Although most partners seem to cope relatively well, the impact of HF on their lives is profound. Partners are vulnerable especially at the onset of the illness, and therefore, it is important to involve partners actively in the early process of rehabilitation and recognize their importance to the patient and their potential problems.

  • 28.
    Luttik, Marie Louise
    et al.
    University Hospital, Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    University Hospital, Groningen.
    Moser, Debra
    Sanderman, Robbert
    van Veldhuisen, Dirk J
    University Hospital, Groningen.
    The importance and impact of social support on outcomes in patients with heart failure: an overview of the literature2005In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 162-169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As advances in medical treatment of heart failure (HF) become limited, other factors are being studied to improve outcomes. There is much evidence that supportive social relations have a major impact on health outcomes and that social support is essential for adjustment to illness. This article describes current research on the influence of social support on outcomes in patients with HF. A computerized literature search in Medline, CINAHL, and PsychLit was performed on each of the different outcomes in relation to social support, covering the period 1993 to 2003. Seventeen studies were found that investigated the relationship between social support and different outcome measures in HF. Four studies found clear relationships between social support and rehospitalizations and mortality; the relationship between quality of life and depression was less clear. Up to now, limited research has been done on the impact of social support on outcomes in patients with HF. The available studies suggest that social support has an impact on HF outcomes but further research is necessary before firm conclusions about the nature of these relationships can be reached.

  • 29.
    Nieuwenhuis, Maurice M. W.
    et al.
    University Groningen.
    van der Wal, Martje H. L.
    University Groningen.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Body of Knowledge on Compliance in Heart Failure Patients We Are Not There Yet2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 21-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Noncompliance with diet and fluid restriction is a problem in patients with heart failure (HF). In recent studies, a relationship between compliance with sodium and fluid restriction and knowledge and beliefs regarding compliance was found. In these studies, however, compliance was primarily measured by interview or questionnaire. Objectives: To examine the relationship between compliance with sodium and fluid restriction measured with a nutrition diary and knowledge, beliefs, and other relevant variables in HF patients. Methods: Eighty-four HF patients completed a nutrition diary for 3 days. Patients also completed questionnaires on knowledge, beliefs regarding compliance, and depressive symptoms. Differences in relevant variables between compliant and noncompliant patients were assessed. Results: Compliance with sodium and fluid restriction was 79% and 72%. Although not statistically significant, a higher percentage of patients were compliant with the less stringent restrictions compared with the more stringent restrictions, and in addition, more noncompliant patients perceived difficulty following the regimen compared with their compliant counterparts. In contrast with other studies, no significant differences in knowledge, beliefs, and relevant demographic and clinical variables were found between compliant and noncompliant patients. Conclusion: Perceived difficulty and the amount of the prescribed restriction seem to be relevant concepts that play a role in compliance with sodium and fluid restriction in HF and need to be explored in future research.

  • 30.
    Rönning, Helén
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nielsen, Niels Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts2013In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 228-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and Research Objective: Adults with congenitally malformed hearts have knowledge gaps regarding their heart condition, and their level of knowledge is not routinely assessed during follow-up. One reason for this is that there are few validated, user-friendly questionnaires to assess knowledge about congenital heart disease and its effects on daily life. Failure to identify low levels of knowledge could lead to less motivated and insecure individuals not actively involved in treatment and care of their heart condition. Therefore, the objective of this study was to develop and test a knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts.

    Participants and Methods: The development and psychometric evaluation of the Knowledge Scale for Adults With Congenitally Malformed Hearts (KnoCoMH) followed 2 phases: (1) development and evaluation of the initial version, with face validity and content validity assessed by experts and adults with congenitally malformed hearts, and (2) evaluation and refinement of the KnoCoMH in adults with congenitally malformed hearts, including item difficulty level, internal consistency, and test-retest reliability.

    Results: The development and evaluation of a knowledge scale for adults with congenitally malformed hearts resulted in the KnoCoMH including 46 items in 4 domains: General Knowledge, with a Kuder-Richardson formula 20 (KR-20) value of 0.68; Medical Treatment, with a KR-20 value of 0.74; Endocarditis Prophylaxis, with a KR-20 value of 0.90; and Contraceptives and Pregnancy, with a KR-20 value of 0.65. Test-retest evaluation showed significant correlations between 0.50 and 0.67 (P < .01) in all 4 domains. There was good variation in item difficulty, with a mean value of 0.56 in General Knowledge, 0.62 in Medical Treatment, 0.33 in Endocarditis Prophylaxis, and 0.48 in Contraceptives and Pregnancy.

    Conclusions: The KnoCoMH has acceptable psychometric properties for most of the knowledge domains included. It can be used for evaluating knowledge among adults with congenitally malformed hearts and its associations with other outcomes. However, further studies are advisable to test construct validity, predictive validity, and responsiveness.

  • 31.
    Stewart, S
    et al.
    The Queen Elizabeth Hospital; Woodville, South Australia.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Netherlands Heart Foundation, The Hague.
    Research in cardiovascular nursing in Europe: toward a UNITED approach. Undertaking Nursing Interventions Throughout Europe Research Group2001In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 69-72Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article describes the efforts of a recent initiative of the Working Group on Cardiovascular Nursing of the European Society of Cardiology. The Undertaking Nursing Interventions Throughout Europe (UNITE) Research Group represents a truly international team of nurses who collaborate on a number of research studies. The major focus of the group is to provide better care to patients in whom modern day treatment has proven to be ineffectual such as patients with chronic, intractable angina.

  • 32.
    van der Wal, Martje
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Hjelmfors, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mårtenson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Friedrichsen, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Center of Palliative Care.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. UCI Program in Nursing Science, University of California, Irvine. USA.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UCI Program in Nursing Science, University of California, Irvine, USA; Mary MacKillop Institute for Health Research, Australian Catholic University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Variables Related to Communication About Prognosis Between Nurses and Patients at Heart Failure Clinics in Sweden and the Netherlands2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 2, p. E1-E6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    In contrast to recommendations in recent guidelines, prognosis is not optimally discussed with patients with heart failure (HF). Reasons for not doing so can be related to both patient and provider characteristics.

    PURPOSE:

    The purpose of the study was to explore which patient- and nurse-related variables influence discussing prognosis with patients at an HF clinic.

    METHOD:

    Data from a previous survey on attitudes and clinical practice of HF nurses on discussing prognosis that was conducted in Sweden and the Netherlands were combined with data from a registration on topics that nurses discussed with their patients during a prespecified week at the HF clinic. Multivariable logistic regression analysis was performed to assess which variables are related to discussing prognosis.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 275 HF nurses (mean age, 49 years) and data of 1633 patients with HF (mean age, 71 years) were included in the study. Prognosis was discussed with 42% of all patients during the visit at the HF clinic. Patients with whom prognosis was discussed were more often in New York Heart Association classes III to IV (odds ratio [OR], 1.81; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.44-2.26). Nurses discussing prognosis reported more knowledge on the topic (OR, 1.71; 95% CI, 1.36-2.16) and discussed more topics with the patient (OR, 1.27; 95% CI, 1.21-1.32). Dutch HF nurses were more likely to discuss prognosis compared with their Swedish colleagues (OR, 1.83; 95% CI, 1.43-2.33).

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Discussing prognosis with patients with HF by nurses at the HF clinic is related to the characteristics of patients and HF nurses. Future interventions to improve communications about prognosis therefore should have a broad approach.

  • 33.
    Vellone, Ercole
    et al.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Fida, Roberta
    University of East Anglia, England.
    Ghezzi, Valerio
    Sapienza University, Italy.
    DAgostino, Fabio
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Biagioli, Valentina
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Paturzo, Marco
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alvaro, Rosaria
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patterns of Self-care in Adults With Heart Failure and Their Associations With Sociodemographic and Clinical Characteristics, Quality of Life, and Hospitalizations A Cluster Analysis2017In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 32, no 2, p. 180-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-care is important in heart failure (HF) treatment, but patients may have difficulties and be inconsistent in its performance. Inconsistencies in self-care behaviors may mirror patterns of self-care in HF patients that are worth identifying to provide interventions tailored to patients. Objectives: The aims of this study are to identify clusters of HF patients in relation to self-care behaviors and to examine and compare the profile of each HF patient cluster considering the patients sociodemographics, clinical variables, quality of life, and hospitalizations. Methods: This was a secondary analysis of data from a cross-sectional study in which we enrolled 1192 HF patients across Italy. A cluster analysis was used to identify clusters of patients based on the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale factor scores. Analysis of variance and x(2) test were used to examine the characteristics of each cluster. Results: Patients were 72.4 years old on average, and 58% were men. Four clusters of patients were identified: (1) high consistent adherence with high consulting behaviors, characterized by younger patients, with higher formal education and higher income, less clinically compromised, with the best physical and mental quality of life (QOL) and lowest hospitalization rates; (2) low consistent adherence with low consulting behaviors, characterized mainly by male patients, with lower formal education and lowest income, more clinically compromised, and worse mental QOL; (3) inconsistent adherence with low consulting behaviors, characterized by patients who were less likely to have a caregiver, with the longest illness duration, the highest number of prescribed medications, and the best mental QOL; (4) and inconsistent adherence with high consulting behaviors, characterized by patients who were mostly female, with lower formal education, worst cognitive impairment, worst physical and mental QOL, and higher hospitalization rates. Conclusion: The 4 clusters identified in this study and their associated characteristics could be used to tailor interventions aimed at improving self-care behaviors in HF patients.

  • 34.
    Verheijden Klompstra, Leonie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Univ Calif Irvine, CA 92717 USA.
    Self-efficacy Mediates the Relationship Between Motivation and Physical Activity Patients With Heart Failure2018In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 211-216Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Motivation is necessary in patients with heart failure (HF) who are attempting to become more physically active but may not be sufficient to initiate physical activity. Self-efficacy might explain the relationship between motivation and physical activity. Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the role of exercise self-efficacy in the relationship between exercise motivation and physical activity in patients with HF. Methods: A total of 100 stable patients with HF (88% in New York Heart Association class IVIII; mean age, 67 +/- 13 years; 62% men) were studied. Self-efficacy was measured with the Exercise Self-Efficacy Scale; motivation, with the Exercise Motivation Index; and physical activity, with a self-report questionnaire. Logistic regression analyses were made to examine the mediation effect of exercise self-efficacy on the relationship between exercise motivation and physical activity. Result: Forty-two percent of the 100 patients reported engaging in less than 60 minutes per week of physical activity. Motivation predicted physical activity (b = 0.58, P amp;lt; .05), but after controlling for self-efficacy, the relationship between motivation and physical activity was no longer significant (b = 0.76, P = .06), indicating full mediation. Conclusion: Motivation to be physically active is important but not sufficient. In addition to a high level of motivation to be physically active, it is important that patients with HF have a high degree of self-efficacy.

  • 35.
    Waldréus, Nana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science.
    Hahn, Robert G
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Research, Södertälje Sjukhus, Södertälje, Sweden.
    Lyngå, Patrik
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Science and Education, Södersjukhuset, Stockholm, Sweden.
    van der Wal, Martje H L
    Department of Cardiology, University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, the Netherlands.
    Hägglund, Ewa
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Cardiology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Jaarsma, Tiny
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Changes in Thirst Intensity During Optimization of Heart Failure Medical Therapy by Nurses at the Outpatient Clinic.2016In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 31, no 5, p. E17-E24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Thirst can be aggravated in patients with heart failure (HF), and optimization of HF medication can have positive impact on thirst.

    OBJECTIVES: The aims of this study were to describe changes in thirst intensity and to determine factors associated with high thirst intensity during optimization of HF medication.

    METHODS AND RESULTS: Patients with HF (N = 66) who were referred to an HF clinic for up-titration of HF medication were included. Data were collected during the first visit to the clinic and at the end of the treatment program. Data were dichotomized by the median visual analog scale score for thirst, dividing patients into 2 groups: low thirst intensity (0-20 mm) and high thirst intensity (>20 mm on a visual analog scale of 0-100 mm). In total, 67% of the patients reported a higher thirst intensity after the HF up-titration program. There was no difference in thirst intensity between the patients who reached target doses and those who did not. Plasma urea level (odds ratio, 1.33; 95% confidence interval, 1.07-1.65) and fluid restriction (odds ratio, 6.25; 95% confidence interval, 1.90-20.5) were independently associated with high thirst intensity in patients with HF.

    CONCLUSIONS: Thirst intensity increased in two-thirds of the patients during a time period of optimization of HF medication. Fluid restriction and plasma urea levels were associated with high thirst intensity.

  • 36.
    Walfridsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Franzén Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden; Ersta Skondal University of Coll, Sweden; Ersta Hospital, Sweden.
    Development and Validation of an Arrhythmia-Specific Scale in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia With Focus on Health-Related Quality of Life2015In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 98-108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arrhythmias can cause a profoundly negative impact on a persons daily life, leading to impaired health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Assessment of HRQOL can provide valuable information before, during, and after healthcare interventions for arrhythmias. Objective: The aim was to develop and validate a disease-specific scale evaluating HRQOL in patients with different forms of arrhythmia. Methods: The Arrhythmia-Specific questionnaire in Tachycardia and Arrhythmia (ASTA HRQOL) was developed from a literature review, patient interviews, and expert panel evaluations. This version was then psychometrically evaluated in patients treated with radiofrequency catheter ablation because of different forms of arrhythmias and patients who sought emergency care because of atrial fibrillation. Construct validity was evaluated with item-total correlations, confirmatory factor analyses, and convergent and discriminant validity. Internal consistency was evaluated using Cronbachs alpha. Results: All items reached the expected level of item-total correlations of greater than 0.3 for the total scale. The content validity index was sufficient for all items, as was the total scale (0.86-1.0). The 2-factor confirmatory factor analysis model that included the physical and mental factors showed a better fit between model and data than the 1-factor model did (P less than .001). Convergent and discriminant validities were evaluated in the correlation analyses between the ASTA HRQOL subscales and SF-36 physical and mental dimensions. A strong correlation was found between the hypothesized physical and mental scales. Internal consistency was satisfactory with a lower bound confidence interval (95%) for Cronbachs alpha .70 or greater for all the ASTA HRQOL scales. Conclusions: The ASTA HRQOL questionnaire can be a valuable contribution to HRQOL assessments in patients with different forms of arrhythmia. Until there is more evidence regarding validity and reliability, using both the total and subscale scores is recommended.

  • 37.
    Ågren, Susanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evangelista, Lorraine
    School of Nursing University of California Los Angeles USA.
    Davidson, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    The influence of chronic heart failure in patient-partner dyads: a comparative study addressing issues of health-related quality of life2011In: Journal of Cardiovascular Nursing, ISSN 0889-4655, E-ISSN 1550-5049, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 65-73Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patients with chronic heart failure (HF) and their partners face many challenges associated with heart disease. High social support in a close relationship has been found to improve survival in patients with HF. However, caring for a patient with HF may have negative effects on the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) of the partner responsible for the care. The main focus in health care is still on improving the patients’ HRQOL, but the awareness of partners’ and families’ role and situation is increasing. Therefore further studies are needed to clarify these issues and the importance of partners in relation to HRQOL of patients with HF.

    Objectives: To describe and compare HRQOL, quality-adjusted life year (QALY) weights, symptoms of depression, perceived control and knowledge in patients with chronic HF and their partners and to compare HRQOL and QALY weights in the partners with an age- and gender-matched group.

    Methods: Data was collected from 135 patient-partner dyads at two Swedish hospitals. Data on the reference group was collected from the same region.

    Results: Patients had lower HRQOL in all dimensions (p < 0.001) except in the mental health domain and lower QALY weights compared to their partners (p < 0.001). Mental health scores were lower in partners compared to the age and gender-matched references (p < 0.001). All other HRQOL scores and the QALY weights were comparable between partners and reference group. Patients had more depressive symptoms than their partners (p < 0.001). There was no difference in the level of perceived control or knowledge about chronic HF between patients and partners.

    Conclusion: Being a partner to a patient with chronic HF markedly affects the mental aspect of HRQOL. Interventions focusing on education and psychosocial support may potentially promote effective coping in partners and enhance their ability to support the patient.

1 - 37 of 37
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf