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  • 1.
    Aasa, Agneta
    et al.
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Hovbäck, Malin
    Kirurgmottagningen, Ryhovs Länssjukhus, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of preoperative information for patient participation in colorectal surgery care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 11-12, p. 1604-1612Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe patients' experiences of a preoperative information session with a nurse, as part of the enhanced recovery after surgery (ERAS) concept, and its impact on patient participation in their own care.

    Background

    Enhanced recovery after surgery is a standardised, multimodal treatment programme for elective colorectal surgery, leading to faster recovery and shorter hospital stays via interprofessional collaboration. The ERAS concept is initiated for patients a week before surgery when the patient receives detailed information about the care process during a meeting with a nurse.

    Design

    The study is a qualitative interpretive study based on interviews.

    Methods

    Twelve patients, nine men and three women, were interviewed. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis (IPA).

    Results

    The analysis identified and formulated five themes: being seen, security, trust, responsibility and participation. All themes are closely related and illustrate positive and negative sides of the patient's experience. They hang together and form a complete set of experiences: ERAS conversation and its impact on patients' participation.

    Conclusions

    The results show that patients feel confirmed in the ERAS conversation. Healthcare professionals need to be bonding more information call during hospitalisation. It is important to confirm the patient in order for them to participate and take responsibility. Reliance on caregivers is important for patients to feel safe and to participate in their own care. This study shows that the ERAS conversation was experienced as being structured and individually tailored, but the information must apply to the patients throughout the period of care.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    Some shortcomings have been revealed, which should enable improvement in the care of patients. Healthcare professionals need to raise awareness of patients' responsibilities for participation in their own recovery and care. Healthcare professionals and patients need to be aware of each other's responsibilities.

  • 2.
    Ahlander, Britt-Marie
    et al.
    Department of Radiology, Ryhov County Hospital, SE-55185, Jönköping, Sweden..
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Maret, Eva
    Department of Clinical Physiology, Karolinska Institutet, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-14186, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Faculty of Medicine and Health, School of Health Science, Örebro University, SE-701 82, Örebro, Sweden..
    Positive effect on patient experience of video-information given prior to cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, a clinical trial2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 5-6, p. 1250-1261Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims: To evaluate the effect of video information given before cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging on patient anxiety and to compare patient experiences of cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging versus myocardial perfusion scintigraphy. To evaluate if additional information has an impact on motion artefacts. Background: Cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging and myocardial perfusion scintigraphy are technically advanced methods for the evaluation of heart diseases. Although cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging is considered to be painless, patients may experience anxiety due to the closed environment. Design: A prospective randomized intervention study, not registered. Methods: The sample (n=148) consisted of 97 patients referred for cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging, randomized to receive either video information in addition to standard text-information (CMR-video/n=49) or standard text-information alone (CMR-standard/n=48). A third group undergoing myocardial perfusion scintigraphy (n=51) was compared with the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group. Anxiety was evaluated before, immediately after the procedure and one week later. Five questionnaires were used: Cardiac Anxiety Questionnaire, State-Trait-Anxiety Inventory, Hospital-Anxiety and Depression-scale, MRI-Fear-Survey-Schedule and the MRI-Anxiety-Questionnaire. Motion artefacts were evaluated by three observers, blinded to the information given. Data were collected between April 2015 and April 2016. The study followed the CONSORT guidelines RESULT: The CMR-video group scored lower (better) than the cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging-standard group in the factor Relaxation (p=0.039) but not in the factor Anxiety. Anxiety levels were lower during scintigraphic examinations compared to the CMR-standard group (p<0.001). No difference was found regarding motion artefacts between CMR-video and CMR-standard. Conclusion: Patient ability to relax during cardiovascular magnetic resonance imaging increased by adding video information prior the exam, which is important in relation to perceived quality in nursing. No effect was seen on motion artefacts. Relevance To Clinical Practice: Video information prior to examinations can be an easy and time effective method to help patients cooperate in imaging procedures.

  • 3.
    Andersson, Ann-Christine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Olheden, Anna
    Landstinget i Kalmar län.
    Patient participation in quality improvement: managers’ opinions of patients as resources2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 23-24, p. 3590-3593Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate managers’ opinions of how to take advantage of patients as resources in quality improvement work in the Swedish healthcare sector.

  • 4.
    Andreae, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Årestedt, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Prevalence and associated factors for decreased appetite among patients with stable heart failure2016In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 25, no 11-12, p. 1703-1712Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo explore the prevalence of decreased appetite and factors associated with appetite among patients with stable heart failure. BackgroundDecreased appetite is an important factor for the development of undernutrition among patients with heart failure, but there are knowledge gaps about prevalence and the factors related to appetite in this patient group. DesignObservational, cross-sectional study. MethodsA total of 186 patients with mild to severe heart failure were consecutively recruited from three heart failure outpatient clinics. Data were obtained from medical records (heart failure diagnosis, comorbidity and medical treatment) and self-rated questionnaires (demographics, appetite, self-perceived health, symptoms of depression and sleep). Blood samples were taken to determine myocardial stress and nutrition status. Heart failure symptoms and cognitive function were assessed by clinical examinations. The Council on Nutrition Appetite Questionnaire was used to assess self-reported appetite. Bivariate correlations and multivariate linear regression analyses were conducted to explore factors associated with appetite. ResultsSeventy-one patients (38%) experienced a loss of appetite with a significant risk of developing weight loss. The final multiple regression model showed that age, symptoms of depression, insomnia, cognitive function and pharmacological treatment were associated with appetite, explaining 27% of the total variance. ConclusionIn this cross-sectional study, a large share of patients with heart failure was affected by decreased appetite, associated with demographic, psychosocial and medical factors. Relevance to clinical practiceLoss of appetite is a prevalent problem among patients with heart failure that may lead to undernutrition. Health care professionals should routinely assess appetite and discuss patients experiences of appetite, nutrition intake and body weight and give appropriate nutritional advice with respect to individual needs.

  • 5.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, H.K.H. Kronprinsessan Victorias barn- och ungdomssjukhus.
    Sleep quality and mood in mothers and fathers accommodated in the family-centred paediatric ward2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. e544-e550Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To describe sleep quality and mood in parents accommodated with their sick child in a family‐centred paediatric ward. Secondary aims were to compare mothers’ and fathers’ sleep quality and mood in the paediatric ward and to compare the parents’ sleep quality and mood between the paediatric ward and in a daily‐life home setting after discharge.

    Background

    Frequent interruptions, ward noise and anxiety affect parents’ sleep quality and mood negatively when accommodated with their sick child in paediatric wards. Poor sleep quality and negative mood decrease the parents’ ability to sustain attention and focus, and to care for their sick child.

    Methods

    This was a prospective and descriptive study. Eighty‐two parents (61 mothers and 21 fathers) with children (median age 6.25 years) admitted to six paediatric wards participated in the study. Uppsala Sleep Inventory, a sleep diary and the Mood Adjective Checklist were used to measure sleep quality and mood.

    Results

    The parents had a good sleep quality in the paediatric ward even though they had more nocturnal awakenings compared to home. Moreover, they were less alert, less interested and had reduced concentration, and were more tired, dull and passive in the hospital than at home after discharge. Vital sign checks, noises made by the staff and medical treatment were given reasons influencing sleep. Poor sleep quality correlated with negative mood.

    Conclusion

    Parents’ sleep quality in family‐centred paediatric care is good. However, the habitual sleep efficacy before admittance to the hospital is lower than expected and needs to be further investigated.

    Relevance to Clinical Practice

    The healthcare professionals should acknowledge parents’ sleep and mood when they are accommodated with their sick child. Further should care at night be scheduled and sleep promoted for the parents to maintain health and well‐being in the family.

  • 6.
    Appelgren Engstrom, Helene
    et al.
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Haggstrom-Nordin, Elisabet
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Borneskog-Sinclair, Catrin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Northumbria Univ, England.
    Almqvist, Anna-Lena
    Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Mothers in same-sex relationships-Striving for equal parenthood: A grounded theory study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To get a deeper understanding of how mothers in same-sex relationships think and reason about their parenthood in terms of gender equality, and how they experience early parental support from child healthcare professionals. Background There is an increasing amount of research on how women in same-sex relationships experience healthcare services when forming a family. Yet there is limited knowledge of what kind of early parental support these women may request. Design Grounded theory. Follows guidelines for qualitative research (COREQ). Method Twenty women ranging from 25 to 42 years of age participated in semi-structured interviews. Data collection and analysis took place in parallel, as recommended in grounded theory methodology. Results The results are described by the core category Same-sex mothers request professional support to achieve equal parenthood, which includes five categories: (a) equality in everyday life, (b) diversity in mother and child attachment, (c) justification of the family structure, (d) ambivalent thoughts about their childs future and (e) a special need for networking and request for professional support. These findings provide a deeper understanding of how same-sex mothers experience their parenthood and the parental support that is offered. Conclusion Child healthcare professionals need to be sensitive and recognise both mothers as equal parents and offer early parenting groups where two-mother families feel included and supported. Relevance to clinical practice Healthcare professionals need to be aware of diverse family formations and meet each parent as a unique individual without heteronormative assumptions. Same-sex mothers must be treated as equal parents and acknowledged as mothers. Healthcare professionals should offer inclusive and supportive parental groups to same-sex families. They should also inform and support nonbirth mothers about the possibility to breastfeed.

  • 7.
    Athlin, Elsy
    et al.
    Karlstad University.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jernfalt, Margareth
    Karlstad University.
    Johansson, Inger
    Karlstad University.
    Factors of importance to the development of pressure ulcers in the care trajectory: perceptions of hospital and community care nurses2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 15-16, p. 2252-2258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The study aimed at describing contributing factors for the progression or regression of pressure ulcers in the care trajectory as they were understood by nurses working in hospitals or community care. Background. The development of pressure ulcers is considered to be connected with early prevention and awareness among nurses and some studies have indicated that the care trajectory may be a weak point. Design. The study was carried out with a qualitative design. Method. Fifteen nurses from two Swedish hospitals and 15 nurses from community care were interviewed during 2005. Qualitative content analysis was used to make an understanding of patterns possible. Findings. Three main categories arose, showing that pressure ulcers were considered to be affected in the care trajectory by factors related to the individual patient, to the healthcare personnel and to the healthcare structure. Hospital and community care nurses mostly had corresponding perceptions of these factors. Conclusion. The study both confirmed previous findings and added new knowledge about factors that may affect pressure ulcer in the trajectory of care. The informants views of nurses responsibilities and their attitudes towards the care of pressure ulcers could, along with their views on the organisation of care, increase the understanding of the occurrence of pressure ulcers. The need for development and clarification of the organisation and responsibility of pressure ulcer care in the care trajectory was stressed. Relevance to clinical practice. The study highlighted attitudes and values among registered nurses, as well as to how to preserve their commitment and increase their knowledge concerning prevention of pressure ulcers.

  • 8.
    Bachrach-Lindström, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jensen, Sara
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundin, Richard
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland.
    Christensson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Attitudes of nursing staff working with older people towards nutritional nursing care2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 11, p. 2007-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to examine attitudes of the nursing staff in geriatric care towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care.

    Background.  Studies show that nutritional risk assessment is seldom performed on older patients as routine and very few patients have a nutritional care plan. Patients in long-term care who are easy to feed are also found to be looked upon more positively than those with high feeding needs.

    Methods.  A total of 252 registered nurses and nurse aids working at geriatric rehabilitation and medical care clinics and resident homes participated in the study. Attitudes were examined using the Staff Attitudes to Nutritional Nursing Care Geriatric scale. The scale includes 18 items and was designed as a one to five-point Lickert-type scale. It gives a total score and five subscales representing the dimensions ‘Norms’, ‘Habits’, ‘Assessment’, ‘Intervention’ and ‘Individualization’. A higher score indicates a more positive attitude.

    Results.  Of all nursing staff, 53% displayed a positive attitude towards factors of importance for nutritional nursing care and the rest displayed a neutral or negative attitude. The ‘Intervention’ dimension, dealing with nutritional problems and how to manage them, reflected the highest level of positive attitudes, which represents 71% of the nursing staff. The ‘Norms’ dimension had the lowest relative frequency of positive attitudes, 27%. The registered nurses held significantly more positive attitudes than the nurse aids did.

    Conclusions.  Nutritional issues comprise an important and time-consuming responsibility in geriatric care; however, nursing staff do not show an unequivocal positive attitude regarding this responsibility. The consequences this entails for the older patient need to be examined further.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nursing staff play an important role in caring for patients who are malnourished or at risk for malnutrition. Positive attitudes might hinder the development of undernourishment or the further worsening of an already undernourished patient's condition.

  • 9.
    Berglund, Helene
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden.
    Hasson, Henna
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Effects of a continuum of care intervention on frail older persons life satisfaction: a randomized controlled study2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 7-8, p. 1079-1090Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives: The aim of this study was to analyse effects of a comprehensive continuum of care (intervention group) on frail older persons life satisfaction, as compared to those receiving usual care (control group). The intervention included geriatric assessment, case management, interprofessional collaboration, support for relatives and organising of care-planning meetings in older persons own homes. Background: Improvements in older persons subjective well-being have been shown in studies including care planning and coordination by a case manager. However, effects of more complex continuum of care interventions on frail older persons life satisfaction are not well explored. DesignRandomised controlled study. Methods: The validated LiSat-11 scale was used in face-to-face interviews to assess older persons life satisfaction at baseline and at three, six and 12 months after the baseline. The odds ratio for improving or maintaining satisfaction was compared for intervention and control groups from baseline to three-month, three- to six-month as well as six- to 12-month follow-ups. Results: Older persons who received the intervention were more likely to improve or maintain satisfaction than those who received usual care, between 6 and 12 month follow-ups, for satisfaction regarding functional capacity, psychological health and financial situation. Conclusions: A comprehensive continuum of care intervention comprising several components had a positive effect on frail older persons satisfaction with functional capacity, psychological health and financial situation. Relevance to clinical practice: Frail older persons represent a great proportion of the persons in need of support from the health care system. Health care professionals need to consider continuum of care interventions impact on life satisfaction. As life satisfaction is an essential part of older persons well-being, we propose that policy makers and managers promote comprehensive continuum of care solutions.

  • 10.
    Berglund, Helene
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Wilhelmson, Katarina
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden .
    Blomberg, Staffan
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden .
    Duner, Anna
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden .
    Kjellgren, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Hasson, Henna
    Swedish Institute Health Science, Sweden .
    Older people's views of quality of care: a randomised controlled study of continuum of care2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 19-20, p. 2934-2944Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To analyse frail older peoples views of quality of care when receiving a comprehensive continuum of care intervention, compared with those of people receiving the usual care (control group). The intervention included early geriatric assessment, case management, interprofessional collaboration, support for relatives and organising of care-planning meetings in older peoples own homes. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanBackground Prior studies indicate that tailored/individualised care planning conducted by a case manager/coordinator often led to greater satisfaction with care planning among older people. However, there is no obvious evidence of any effects of continuum of care interventions on older peoples views of quality of care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign Randomised controlled study. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Items based on a validated questionnaire were used in face-to-face interviews to assess older peoples views of quality of care at three, six and 12months after baseline. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults Older people receiving a comprehensive continuum of care intervention perceived higher quality of care on items about care planning (p0005), compared with those receiving the usual care. In addition, they had increased knowledge of whom to contact about care/service, after three and 12months (pandlt;003). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions The study gives evidence of the advantages of a combination of components such as organising care-planning meetings in older peoples own homes, case management and interprofessional teamwork. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRelevance to clinical practice The results have implications for policymakers, managers and professionals in the area of health and social care for older people to meet individual needs of frail older people.

  • 11.
    Berterö, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Grundström, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    The double-edged experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis: a qualitative study2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 1-2, p. 205-211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives

    To identify and describe the experience of healthcare encounters among women with endometriosis.

    Background

    Endometriosis is a “hidden” chronic gynaecological disease appearing in every 10th woman of fertile age. Different manifestations of pain are the main symptoms, often leading to impaired physical and mental health, and lower quality of life. Previous research on healthcare experiences among women with endometriosis has focused on diagnostic delay and experiences of encountering general practitioners.

    Design

    A qualitative, interpretive, phenomenological approach was used.

    Methods

    We interviewed nine women aged 23–55, with a laparoscopy-confirmed diagnosis of endometriosis. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The data were analysed following the steps of the interpretive phenomenological approach.

    Results

    Two themes were identified in the interview transcripts: being treated with ignorance and being acknowledged. The essence: “the double-edged experience of healthcare encounters” emerged from the themes. The women's experience was double-edged as it involved contradictory feelings: the encounters were experienced as both destructive or constructive. On the one hand, the destructive side was characterised by ignorance, exposure and disbelief. On the other hand, the constructive side made the women feel acknowledged and confirmed, boosting their self-esteem.

    Conclusions

    The new and important aspects of the findings are that the experience of healthcare encounters is for the first time expressed as double-edged: both destructive and constructive. The experience was of specific importance as it affected the women's perceptions of themselves and of their bodies.

    Relevance to clinical practice

    The information about the constructive side of the experience is of clinical valuable for all healthcare professionals (nurses, midwives and doctors) encountering these women, as it provides a new level of understanding of the experiences. The findings demonstrate both psychological and practical aspects that can help professionals to improve the encounters.

  • 12.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Organisation of care for Swedish patients with an Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator, a national survey2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 17-18, p. 2600-2608Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To describe the clinical aspects of Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICD) care in Sweden with focus on organisation, the role and education of nurses, patient information and education, and areas in need of improvement.

    Background: ICD implantations have developed rapidly in recent years and is now an established arrhythmia treatment. The expanding indication for ICD implantation demands new competencies and resources in the ICD team members.

    Methods: Participants were recruited among physicians and nurses in all of the hospitals implanting ICDs (N=16). Data was collected by a questionnaire. Additionally, all written educational materials provided to patients pre- and post-implant were collected from all 16 hospitals. Deductive content analysis using Sarvimäki and Stenbock-Hult’s five holistic dimensions was employed to ascertain how information was provided in brochures and information materials.

    Results: Half of the hospitals (n=8) had nurse-based outpatient clinics and several others planned to introduce them. Three hospitals carried out distance follow-ups by means of telemonitoring. The nurses had received specific ICD education from ICD companies and/or various university courses. The biophysical dimension dominated in the information material while the emotional, intellectual, and socio-cultural dimensions were scarcely described, and the spiritual- existential was not referred to at all.

    Conclusion: Holistic care of ICD patients can be achieved by means of a multi-disciplinary ICD team and more patient-centred educational strategies. In Sweden, the organisation of ICD care and follow-up is developing towards more nurse-based clinics.

    Relevance to clinical practice: Development and implementation of structured care programmes with a more holistic approach, can improve future ICD care. The content of the written educational materials need to be more holistic, rather than mainly focusing on the biophysical and technical aspects of living with an ICD.

  • 13.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hedberg, Berith
    Jönköping Academic Qual Improvement and Leadership Heatlh, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Communication between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the initial visit to a continuous positive airway pressure clinic2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 3-4, p. 568-577Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To describe facilitators and barriers from a patient perspective in communications between patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome and healthcare personnel during the first meeting when continuous positive airway pressure is initiated. Background. Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment tends to be poor, especially at the initial phase of treatment. Communication between the patient and healthcare personnel has not been studied from the patient perspective, as either a barrier or facilitator for adherence. Methods. A descriptive design using qualitative content analysis was used. Interviews with 25 patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome took place after their initial visit at four continuous positive airway pressure clinics. A deductive analysis based on The 4 Habits Model (i.e. emphasise the importance of investing in the beginning of the consultation, elicit the patients perspective, demonstrate empathy and invest in the end of the consultation) was conducted. Results. Building confidence (i.e. structure building, information transfer, commitment) or hindering confidence (i.e. organisational insufficiency, stress behaviour, interaction deficit) was associated with investing in the beginning. Motivating (i.e. situational insight, knowledge transfer, practical training) or demotivating (i.e. expectations, dominance and power asymmetry, barriers) was associated with eliciting the patients perspective. Building hope (i.e. awareness, sensitivity, demonstration of understanding) or hindering hope (i.e. unprepared, uncommitted, incomprehension) was associated with showing empathy. Agreement (i.e. confirmation, responsibilities, comprehensive information) or disagreement (i.e. structural obscurity, irresponsibility, absent-mindedness) was associated with investing in the end. Conclusions. Understanding of facilitators and barriers, as described by patients, can be used to improve contextual conditions and communication skills among healthcare personnel. Relevance to clinical practice. A patient-centred communication technique should be used in relation to all stages of The 4 Habits Model to facilitate shared decision-making and improve adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

  • 14.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Pakpour, Amir H.
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Qazvin Univ Med Sci, Iran.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Development and psychometric evaluation of the Swedish propensity to achieve healthy lifestyle scale in patients with hypertension2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 21-22, p. 4040-4049Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PurposeTo develop and validate a Swedish questionnaire to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction in patients with hypertension. DesignCross-sectional design. MethodsA total of 270 consecutive patients with hypertension diagnosed at four primary care centres in Sweden were included. The 6-item Swedish version of the Propensity to Achieve Healthy Lifestyle Scale (PAHLS) was developed to measure propensity for behaviour change regarding food habits, physical activity and weight reduction. The PAHLS (i.e., including three items for preparedness and three items for capacity) was developed by three multiprofessional researchers inspired by the transtheoretical model of behaviour change in collaboration with clinically active nurses. Data were collected by questionnaires on food habits (i.e., the Food Frequency Questionnaire), physical activity (the International Physical Activity Questionnaire), propensity for a healthy lifestyle (the PHLQ), as well as during a clinical examination. Exploratory (EFA) and confirmatory factor analyses (CFA), as well as Rasch analysis, were used. ResultsOf the 270 patients (50% women), 27% scored low levels of physical activity on the International Physical Activity Questionnaire, and 34% of the patients were obese (body mass index 30kg/m(2)). The EFA (explaining 54% of the variance) showed unidimensionality for the PAHLS that was supported by both CFA and Rasch analyses. No floor and 1.9% ceiling effects were found. Multiple group CFA (an extension of structural equationmodelling) showed that the PAHLS operated equivalently across both male and female patients. Internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha 0.83) and composite reliability (0.89) were good. ConclusionThe initial testing of PAHLS provided good validity and reliability scores to measure propensity for behaviour change in patients with hypertension. Relevance to Clinical PracticeThe PAHLS can be used by nurses as a tool to simplify shared decision-making in relation to behavioural changes.

  • 15.
    Broström, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Congestive heart failure, spouses' support and the couple's sleep situation: a critical incident technique analysis2003In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 223-233Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Sleep related breathing disorders are common as well as a poor prognostic sign associated with higher mortality in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF). These patients often have a shorter total duration of sleep, disturbed sleep structure and increased daytime sleepiness, which can negatively affect all dimensions of the life situation. The spouse has an important role in supporting the patient in relation to sleep disorders, but this role may be adversely affected by the sleep situation of the couple.

    •  The aim of this study was to describe decisive situations that influence spouses' support to patients with CHF in relation to the couple's sleep situation.

    • A qualitative descriptive design using critical incident technique was employed. Incidents were collected by means of interviews with 25 spouses of patients with CHF, strategically selected from two hospital-based specialist clinics in southern Sweden.

    •  Two main areas emerged in the analysis: support stimulating situations and support inhibiting situations. Support stimulating situations described how spouses' support was positively affected by their own adaptation in psychosocial or practical situations, and receiving help from others. Support inhibiting situations described how the spouses' support was negatively affected by sleep disturbances as a result of the patient's symptoms, anxiety in relation to the disease, limitations as a result of the sleeping habits, dissatisfaction with care related to the sleep situation, and being left to cope alone with the problems.

    •  An increased understanding of the stimulating and inhibiting situations influencing spouses' support for patients with CHF can guide health care personnel in deciding if an intervention is needed to improve the sleep situation for patient and spouse.

  • 16.
    Bååth, Carina
    et al.
    Karlstad universitet Karlstad.
    Hall-Lord, Marie-Louise
    Karlstad universitet Karlstad.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Wiberg-Hedman, Katarina
    Karlstad universitet Karlstad.
    Wilde Larsson, Bodil
    Karlstad universitet Karlstad.
    Interrater reliability using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card, Short Form-Mini Nutritional Assessment by registered and enrolled nurses in clinical practice2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 618-626Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. Examine the interrater reliability between and among registered and enrolled nurses using Modified Norton Scale, Pressure Ulcer Card and Short Form-Mini Nutritional Assessment. Background. In Sweden, registered nurses and enrolled nurses usually co-operate in patient care. National guidelines emphasize that reliable and valid assessment tools should be used. Interrater reliability for regular use of assessment tools is seldom studied. Design cross-sectional. Registered nurses and enrolled nurses made 228 assessments of patients' skin, risk for pressure ulcer and malnutrition, in patients with hip fracture and patients who had suffered a stroke. Results. The interrater reliability of the Modified Norton Score total score was very good among registered nurses, good among enrolled nurses and between both groups. There was good, moderate and fair agreement on the subscales. Interrater reliability of Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assesment screening score was very good between both groups, good among registered nurses and moderate among enrolled nurses. There was good and moderate agreement on the items. There was good, moderate and fair agreement between and among registered nurses and enrolled nurses when using the Pressure Ulcer Card. Conclusion. The Modified Norton Scale and Short Form Mini-Nutritional Assessment were reasonably understandable and easy to utilize in clinical care. Therefore, it seems possible for nurses to accomplish assessment using these tools. The agreement level was low for most skin sites except sacrum when nurses assessed patients' skin with the Pressure Ulcer Card. Relevance to clinical practice. The utilize of reliable and valid assessment tools is important in clinical practice. The tools could be used as an aid to the clinical judgement and therefore identify patients at risk for pressure ulcers and malnutrition. Pressure ulcer grading is a difficult skill that requires training and time to develop. © 2007 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 17.
    Börjeson, Sussanne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arweström, Carina
    Länssjukhuset i Kalmar.
    Baker, Angelica
    Länssjukhuset i Värnamo.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nurses' experiences in the relief of postoperative nausea and vomiting2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 13-14, p. 1865-1872Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. The aim of the study was to illuminate the experience of nurses in relieving postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Background. Postoperative nausea and vomiting has been shown to be one of the most common and distressing side effects of surgery. In spite of this, there has been little research on the role of nurses in caring for patients with postoperative nausea and vomiting.

    Design. Qualitative approach using narratives.

    Methods. Ten female nurses from two general surgical departments were interviewed. The transcribed interviews were analysed using the hermeneutic narrative method inspired by Polkinghorne.

    Results. The nurses report that they have what may be described as a set of different tools at their disposal. These tools can be entitled 'listen and understand', 'information', 'the clinical eye' and 'availability', all of which can be used in solving several needs. However, some nurses have better skills or more opportunities to use the available tools than do others. By using these tools, the nurses can increase their possibilities for enhancing the patients' efforts to gain control over their own situation and thereby increase the quality of their care.

    Conclusion. Nurses use different types of tools to relieve postoperative nausea and vomiting and it is possible to create a positive nursing care situation if patients are given the opportunity to be in control and handle their own situation.

    Relevance to clinical practice. When it comes to relieving postoperative nausea and vomiting, the findings of this study are important as the study highlights the practical actions taken by nurses and their experiences. When nurses have the possibility to use their nursing tools in an optimal way, together with their experience and knowledge and then follow their nursing actions by being able to reflect on them, they can further develop their approach to nursing and thereby increase their competence as nurses.

  • 18.
    Carlsson, Eva
    et al.
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Ehnfors, Margareta
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin, Örebro.
    Ehrenberg, Anna
    Örebro universitet, Institutionen för hälsovetenskap och medicin, Örebro.
    Accuracy and continuity in discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke.2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 1-2, p. 21-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: To describe the accuracy and continuity of discharge information for patients with eating difficulties after stroke.

    BACKGROUND: Eating difficulties are prevalent and serious problems in patients with stroke. Screening for eating difficulties can predict undernutrition and subsequent care needs. For optimal care, information transferred between care settings has to be comprehensive and accurate.

    DESIGN: Prospective, descriptive.

    METHODS: The study investigated a sample of 15 triads, each including one patient with stroke along with his patient record and discharge summary and two nursing staff in the municipal care to whom the patient was discharged. Data were collected by observations of patients' eating, record audits and interviews with nurses. Data were analysed using content analysis and descriptive statistics.

    RESULTS: Accuracy of recorded information on patients' eating difficulties and informational continuity were poor, as was accuracy in the transferred information according to nursing staff's perceptions. All patients were at risk of undernutrition and in too poor a state to receive rehabilitation. Nevertheless, patients' eating difficulties were described in a vague and unspecific language in the patient records. Co-ordinated care planning and management continuity related to eating difficulties were largely lacking in the documentation. Despite their important role in caring for patients with eating difficulties, little information on eating difficulties seemed to reach licensed practical nurses in the municipalities.

    CONCLUSIONS: Comprehensiveness in the documentation of eating difficulties and accuracy of transferred information were poor based on record audits and as perceived by the municipal nursing staff. Although all patients were at risk of undernutrition, had multiple eating difficulties and were in too poor a state for rehabilitation, explicit care plans for nutritional problems were lacking.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Lack of accuracy and continuity in discharge information on eating difficulties may increase risk of undernutrition and related complications for patients in continuous stroke care. Therefore, the discharge process must be based on comprehensive and accurate documentation.

  • 19.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Andersson-Gare, Boel
    Jonkoping County Council.
    Child health nurses' roles and attitudes in reducing children's tobacco smoke exposure2010In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 19, no 3-4, p. 507-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To investigate and analyse the attitudes to tobacco prevention among child healthcare nurses, to study how tobacco preventive work is carried out at child healthcare centres today. To evaluate how the tobacco preventive work had changed in child health care since the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfares national evaluation in 1997. Background. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke has adverse health effects. Interventions aiming at minimising environmental tobacco smoke have been developed and implemented at child healthcare centres in Sweden but the long-term effects of the interventions have not been studied. Design. Survey. Methods. In 2004, a postal questionnaire was sent to all nurses (n = 196) working at 92 child healthcare centres in two counties in south-eastern Sweden. The questionnaire was based on questions used by the National Board of Health and Welfare in their national evaluation in 1997 and individual semi-structured interviews performed for this study. Results. Almost all the nurses considered it very important to ask parents about their smoking habits (median 9.5, range 5.1-10.0). Collaboration with antenatal care had decreased since 1997. Nearly all the nurses mentioned difficulties in reaching fathers (70%), groups such as immigrant families (87%) and socially vulnerable families (94%) with the tobacco preventive programme. No nurses reported having special strategies to reach these groups. Conclusions. Improvement of methods for tobacco prevention at child healthcare centres is called for, especially for vulnerable groups in society. However, the positive attitude among nurses found in this study forms a promising basis for successful interventions. Relevance to clinical practice. This study shows that launching national programmes for tobacco prevention is not sufficient to achieve sustainable work. Nurses working in child healthcare centres have an overall positive attitude to tobacco prevention but need continuous education and training in communication skills especially to reach social vulnerable groups. Regular feedback from systematic follow-ups might increase motivation for this work.

  • 20.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Individually adjusted meals for older people with protein-energy malnutrition: a single-case study2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 491-502Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a 3-month intervention programme consisting of meals based on individual nutritional requirements in residents assessed as protein-energy malnourished on admission to a municipal care Institution.

    • Using a single-case design, 11 malnourished residents were given individual care aimed at fulfilling their personal requirements for energy intake during a period of 12 weeks. The residents were selected from a sample of 261 newly admitted older adults of whom 87 were assessed to be malnourished on admission. Nutritional status, including anthropometric and biochemical variables and functional capacities were assessed before, during, and after the intervention. Energy intake was recorded every day. Body weight, and serum concentration of albumin and transthyretin were measured every other week.

    •  During a 3-month period, the mean value of energy intake reached the calculated energy requirement in 10 residents. Eight residents increased in weight, triceps skin-fold thickness, and transthyretin concentration. Nine residents increased in arm muscle circumference, and 10 showed increased serum albumin concentration and functional capacity.

    • We conclude that nursing care based on individual nutritional requirements, resources, and desires improves nutritional status and functional capacity in a group of malnourished residents.

  • 21.
    Claesson, Annica
    et al.
    Department of Intensive Care Unit, Oskarshamn Hospital, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Mattson, Helen
    Department of Intensive Care Unit, Oskarshamn Hospital, Kalmar County Council, Sweden.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Experiences expressed by artificially ventilated patients2005In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 116-117Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 22.
    Drevenhorn, E.
    et al.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Bengtson, A.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Outcomes following a programme for lifestyle changes with people with hypertension2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 7b, p. 144-151Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    The purpose of the study was to explore the effects of using a structured nursing intervention programme in hypertension care.

    BACKGROUND:

    Counselling on lifestyle changes to address hypertension helps patients reduce risk factors such as smoking, high alcohol consumption, overweight, dyslipidemia, negative stress and physical inactivity.

    DESIGN:

    The study was performed as a pre-test-post-test study.

    METHODS:

    All 177 patients diagnosed with hypertension visiting a health centre in Southern Sweden were invited to be counselled by a public health nurse about hypertension, cardiovascular risk factors and non-pharmacological treatment with 15 months follow up.

    RESULTS:

    One hundred patients participated in the study. Systolic blood pressure decreased overall (p < 0.01), three patients with high alcohol consumption were identified, two smokers stopped smoking, two new diabetics were discovered, physical activity increased (p = 0.035) and one-third of the patients changed their medication.

    CONCLUSION:

    The level of exercise increased and a reduction in systolic blood pressure and in women's weight were the most obvious results of this intervention study. The study elucidates the challenge of executing health behaviour changes.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Counselling following a hypertension programme gives hypertensive patients a chance to execute lifestyle changes and have their medication adjusted to achieve goals for blood pressure control. Further prospective studies in this area, with well-defined intervention approaches and several years of follow up, are necessary.

  • 23.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Sleep quality and responses to insufficient sleep in women on different work shifts2002In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 280-288Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    ò The aim of this study was to examine degrees of cognitive behavioural effects of fatigue, mood changes and somatic responses to sleep loss in women with and without sufficient sleep, and to explore possible links between effects of sleep loss and specific sleep disturbances in selected groups. ò A total 156 women working in a casualty department on different work shifts responded to a questionnaire which measured sleep quality, strain and symptoms related to working conditions, as well as effects of sleep loss. ò About 40% of the women had perceived insufficient sleep during the last 6 months. They perceived significantly worse sleep quality and a higher degree of strain according to working conditions than the others. Palpitation and dysphoria as effects of sleep loss were independently predicted by sleep quality. Dysphoria was also predicted by difficulty in falling asleep. Cognitive behavioural effects of fatigue was predicted by disturbed sleep. Palpitation effects led to a 10-fold increase in the probability of cognitive behavioural effects of fatigue. The effects were most prominent among women suffering from gastrointestinal problems of long duration and chronic pain. ò Responses to reduced sleep quality in women constitute a form of stress, with sympathetic activation, increased susceptibility to infection, moderate cognitive impairment, mood changes and somatic distress.

  • 24.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Angelhoff, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care.
    Johnsson, Ewa
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Karlsson, Jenny
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Hindering and buffering factors for parental sleep in neonatal care. A phenomenographic study2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 5-6, p. 717-727Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES:

    To explore and describe how parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care perceive their sleep.

    BACKGROUND:

    Parents experience many stressful situations when their newborn infant is preterm and/or sick. This affects bonding. By developing more family-centred care units with single-family rooms, parents are given the opportunity to stay and care for their newborn infant(s) 24 hours a day. Lack of sleep may affect new parents' ability to cope with the many challenges they face on a daily basis.

    DESIGN:

    A phenomenographic study with an inductive and exploratory design.

    METHODS:

    Semi-structured interviews were conducted with twelve parents of infants in neonatal care between January-March 2012. To describe variations in perception of the phenomenon, data were analysed using phenomenography.

    FINDINGS:

    Four descriptive categories were identified within the phenomenon sleep in parents of preterm and/or sick infants in neonatal care: impact of stress on sleep; how the environment affects sleep; keeping the family together improves sleep; and, how parents manage and prevent tiredness.

    CONCLUSION:

    Anxiety, uncertainty and powerlessness have a negative influence on sleep. This can be decreased by continuous information, guidance and practical support. Skin-to-skin care was perceived as a stress-reducing factor that improved relaxation and sleep and should be encouraged by the nurse. The parents also mentioned the importance of being together. Having a private place where they could relax and take care of themselves and their newborn infant improved sleep. It was also desirable to involve older siblings in order to decrease feelings of loneliness, sadness and isolation.

    RELEVANCE FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE:

    Improved parental sleep in neonatal care may help the families cope with the situation and facilitate problem-solving, emotional regulation and the transition to parenthood.

  • 25.
    Efraimsson, E.
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, University College of Borås, Borås, Sweden, Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden, School of Health Sciences, University College of Borås, Allégatan 1, S-501 90 Borås, Sweden.
    Sandman, P.O.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Rasmussen, B.H.
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden.
    Discharge planning: 'Fooling ourselves?' - Patient participation in conferences2004In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 562-570Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The aim of discharge planning conferences (DPCs) is to co-ordinate resources and to enhance patient involvement in care in connection with relocation from hospital. DPCs can be characterized as institutional conversations, and are often executed as standard procedures, but the scientific basis for the activity is weak. Aims and objectives. The aim of this study was to illuminate and describe the communication at DPCs. Design. A purposeful and consecutive sample of eight DPCs was collected in which the future care of eight women, aged 70 years or more, was discussed. Methods. Transcribed video recordings were analysed in two steps. 'The initial analysis' aimed at describing the structure and content of the communication. This description constituted the basis for an interpretation, leading to 'the focused analysis' aiming at finding evidence for the assumptions made in the interpretation. Results. The result revealed that the participation of patients was very less the DPCs. The decisions had often already been made, and the women were expected to be pleased with the decision, institutional representatives (IRs) frequently justified their actions by referring to bureaucratic praxis. Conclusions. The women were both encouraged and excluded from participation by the IRs. This dichotomy occurred because the IRs, as professionals, struggled to simultaneously realize their caring mission and their obligation to enforce the values and rules of the institution, i.e. efficiency and rationality. Thus, IRs and patients were equally imprisoned within the institutional system. Relevance to clinical research. This result illustrates how conflicting paradigms are imbedded and reproduced by healthcare professionals in their communicative praxis. Awareness of this is a prerequisite for improvements in working procedures congruent with a caring paradigm that support patient participation.

  • 26.
    Eriksson, Kerstin
    et al.
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wikström, Lotta
    Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Lindblad-Fridh, Marianne
    Jönköping University, Sweden .
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Using mode and maximum values from the Numeric Rating Scale when evaluating postoperative pain management and recovery2013In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 22, no 5-6, p. 638-647Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To (1) examine the clinical applicability of compiled mode and maximum values from the Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) by comparing the correspondence between patient perceptions of pain and pain values from monitoring records, as well as (2) to study the relationship between mode and maximum values and self-assessed ability for early postoperative recovery. Background. Documentation of pain remains a problem despite recommendations of quality improvements. To examine the correlation between patient perceptions and documented pain therefore becomes important. Few have studied how pain affects recovery. Design. A quantitative cross-sectional design was used in which 157 postoperative patients answered a questionnaire on pain intensity and recovery. A parallel examination of pain in monitoring records was conducted. Results. A total of 57% had a mode value calculated from records between 0 and 3 on postoperative day 1 and 69% on day 2. A maximum value between 4 and 10 was found in monitoring records for 73% on day 1 and for 67% on day 2. The correspondence between mode value from monitoring records and the patients retrospective perceptions was 88% for NRS 03 and 92% between maximum value and NRS 410. The correlation between documented pain and retrospectively identified pain for mode value of the NRS in all (010) was rather weak (r=0 center dot 37), while maximum value had a stronger correlation (r=0 center dot 53). Conclusion. Mode and maximum values could be used as outcome measures when evaluating postoperative pain. Pain affects recovery negatively, but more research is needed to strengthen the evidence for the use and clarify the link between pain and recovery. Relevance to clinical practice. International organisations emphasise the importance of improving pain assessment. Mode and maximum values are easy to compile for nurses and can, together with assessments of how experienced pain levels affect postoperative recovery, improve treatment of postoperative pain.

  • 27.
    Fex, Angelika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    Department of Nursing, Health and Culture, University West, Trollhättan.
    Self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home2009In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 18, p. 2809-2817Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. This study aimed to describe lived experiences of self-care among persons using advanced medical technology at home.

    Background. An increased number of people are performing self-care while using different sorts of advanced medical technology at home. Knowledge of different patient groups' lived experiences of this situation may be useful for nurses and other caregivers in educating and supporting these patients.

    Design. A qualitative design was used.

    Methods. Suitable patients in western Sweden were informed by their nurses and invited to participate. Ten people, who performed self-care at home, either while using long-term oxygen therapy from a ventilator or oxygen cylinder, or while performing peritoneal or haemodialysis, were interviewed. The interviews were analysed using a descriptive phenomenological methodology.

    Results. Prerequisites for self-care when using advanced medical technology at home were: support from professional caregivers and significant others; cognitive capacity; and a positive attitude to life. This type of self-care contains steps for living healthy, for planning and for adjusting technology. It involves a process of learning and feelings both of being tied up and of feeling free. Additionally, it has influences on the home environment.

    Conclusion. Self-care in this context can be described on a generic level. Self-care is more than mastering the technology; it also means dealing with daily life activities for healthy living, planning for the use of the equipment and activities, having knowledge about bodily signs of good and ill-health, and adjusting treatment according to the circumstances.

    Relevance to clinical practice. Self-care in this context involves a learning process with education and continuing access to support from professional caregivers. With knowledge and support, patients are able to assume substantial responsibility for self-care. Needs for design improvements of medical technology for use at home are raised.

  • 28.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ivarsson, Anita
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Jinhage, Britt-Marie
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Goöteborg, Sweden.
    Sandstedt, Bengt
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Edvardsson, Nils
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Fridlund, Bengt
    School of Social & Health Sciences, Halmstad University, Halmstad, Sweden.
    Life situation of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator: a descriptive longitudinal study2001In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 563-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The aim of this study was to describe changes in the life situation of patients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator over a period of 1 year. A sample of 56 consecutive patients took part in the study.

    •  Life situation was measured through uncertainty in illness, satisfaction, and fear of the life situation. Descriptive statistics were used to present results, and analytical statistics were used to map out changes over time.

    • Overall uncertainty showed a decrease over time. A statistically significant difference was found within the domain uncertainty related to information (P < 0.001).

    • Satisfaction increased within the domains health-functioning, socio-economic, psychological–spiritual, and family.

    • The ability to act within the domain health-functioning showed a statistical significance (P < 0.05).

    • The domain life changes within fear in the life situation decreased and showed a statistical significance (P < 0.05).

    • The overall life situation showed increased satisfaction as well as lower uncertainty and fear in the life situation.

    •  The research indicates that patients need more information about changes in the life situation after the implantable cardioverter defibrillator-implantation. The study encourages more humanistic, holistic research about patients’ life situations as well as more education in teaching skills for health care personnel.

  • 29.
    Flemme, Inger
    et al.
    Halmstad University.
    Johansson, Ingela
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Living with life-saving technology - coping strategies in implantable cardioverter defibrillators recipients2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 3-4, p. 311-321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims.  To describe coping strategies and coping effectiveness in recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator and to explore factors influencing coping.

    Background.  Implantable cardioverter defibrillators are documented as saving lives and are used to treat ventricular tachycardia and ventricular fibrillation. Despite the implantable cardioverter defibrillator not evidently interfering with everyday life, there is conflicting evidence regarding the psychosocial impact of an implantable cardioverter defibrillator implantation such as anxiety, depression, perceived control and quality of life and how these concerns may relate to coping.

    Design.  Cross-sectional multicentre design.

    Methods.  Individuals (n = 147, mean age 63 years, 121 men) who had lived with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator between 6–24 months completed the Jalowiec Coping Scale-60, Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, Control Attitude Scale and Quality of Life Index-Cardiac version.

    Results.  Implantable cardioverter defibrillators recipients seldom used coping strategies, and the coping strategies used were perceived as fairly helpful. Optimism was found to be the most frequently used (1·8 SD 0·68) and most effective (2·1 SD 0·48) coping strategy, and recipients perceived moderate control in life. Anxiety (β = 3·5, p ≤ 0·001) and gender (β = 12·3, p = 0·046) accounted for 26% of the variance in the total use of coping strategies, suggesting that the more symptoms of anxiety and being women the greater use of coping strategies.

    Conclusions.  Most recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator did not appraise daily concerns as stressors in need of coping and seem to have made a successful transition in getting on with their lives 6–24 months after implantation.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses working with recipients with an implantable cardioverter defibrillator should have a supportive communication so that positive outcomes such as decreased anxiety and increased perceived control and quality of life can be obtained. Through screening for anxiety at follow-up in the outpatient clinic, these recipients perceiving mental strain in their daily life can be identified.

  • 30.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Univ West, Sweden.
    Barimani, Mia
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Parents reasons for not attending parental education groups in antenatal and child health care: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 17-18, p. 3330-3338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives To explore expectant and new parents reasons not to participate in parental education (PE) groups in antenatal care or child health care. Background In Sweden, expectant and new parents are offered PE groups in antenatal care and in child health care. Although many parents feel unprepared for parenthood, an urgent task is to attract parents to attend the PE groups. Design A total of 915 parents with children aged 0 to 21 months answered a web questionnaire with open questions about (a) reasons not to participate; (b) anything that could change their mind; and (c) parenting support instead of PE groups. This was analysed using content analysis. The study follows the SRQR guidelines. Results Parents expressed private reasons for not attending PE groups. Some parents also asked for more heterogeneity regarding content and methods, as well as accommodation of parents different interests. Other parents asked for like-minded individuals who were in similar situation to themselves. Lack of information or invitations from antenatal care or child health care, or that PE groups were unavailable, were additional reasons for not participating in groups. Conclusions Reasons for not attending PE groups were multifaceted from personal, self-interested and norm-critical reasons, to that the groups were not available or that the parents were not aware of their existence. Relevance to clinical practice Parents of today are a diverse group with different interests and needs. Nevertheless, all parents need to feel included in a way that makes participation in PE groups relevant for them. Thus, it is important for leaders to be aware of structures and norms, and to be able to create a group climate and a pedagogy of acceptance where group members value each others differences. However, to attract parents to participate in PE groups, it is necessary for clinical practice to work on individual, group and organisational levels.

  • 31.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The role as moderator and mediator in parent education groups - a leadership and teaching approach model from a parent perspective2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 13-14, p. 1966-1974Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To investigate the didactic and social leadership in parent education groups based on a parent perspective, and to conceptualize parent experiences of the leader roles in these groups.

    Background.  Leadership in parent education groups has been associated with a lack of confidence in one's ability to function in that role. Research on how it can be delivered to produce a favourable outcome is scarce. It can be difficult to abandon the role of expert and let participants set their own learning agenda. To facilitate these processes requires leadership skills, knowledge of group dynamics, as well as pedagogical skills.

    Design.  Qualitative interview study.

    Methods. Semi-structured interviews with parents (25 participants, 21 interviews). Transcripts were analysed using, first, thematic analysis, then comparative analysis.

    Results.  The study resulted in a four-field model, The Leadership – Teaching Approach model. It consists of the dimensions "Teaching approaches" ("Knowledge is imparted" and "Knowledge is jointly constructed "), and "Leadership approaches" ("Instrumental approach" and "Investigative approach").

    Conclusions. Using an investigative approach is necessary in order to get a well-functioning group that can help the expectant and new parents in the transition to parenthood. Supervision can help develop an awareness of one's professional role as a nurse and leader of a parent education group.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  The actions and choices of nurses as leaders of parent groups have an impact on how the participants perceive and take in the content and purpose of the group, and whether they perceive it as meaningful. Getting support in reflecting about one’s role as a leader in this context can help create a learning environment in which the participants can become engaged in the activities and be strengthened by the experience. 

  • 32.
    Fridlund, B
    et al.
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Lindgren, E.-C
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Ivarsson, A
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Jinhage, B.-M
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Bolse, Kärstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Flemme, Inger
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Sandstedt, B
    Sahlgrenska Universitetssjukhuset.
    Mårtensson, J
    Högskolan i Halmstad.
    Patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillators and their conceptions of the life situation: a qualitative analysis2000In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 37-45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • The implantable cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD) is today widely used for the treatment of sudden cardiac near-death episodes as a result of malignant ventricular dysrhythmia.

    • After examining the literature, only four descriptive studies, all carried out in the USA, with a qualitative analysis based on ICD-patients’ own perspectives on their life situation have been found.

    •  The aim of this study was to describe how patients living with an ICD-device in south-western Sweden conceive their life situation.

    •  As the focus was on patients’ conceptions seen from a holistic perspective, an analysis inspired by phenomenography was employed on a strategic sample of 15 ICD-patients.

    • Six categories emerged: a feeling of safety, a feeling of gratitude, a feeling of being, having a network, having a belief in the future, and gaining awareness.

    • Although the findings cannot be generalized because of the descriptive research design, they illuminate the beneficial as well as intrusive effects of such a device, and emphasize the need for support groups for patients and families as well as further education for personnel in hospital and primary health care.

  • 33.
    Harle, Karolina
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindgren, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Experience of living with an enterocutaneous fistula2015In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 24, no 15-16, p. 2175-2183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. The purpose of this study was to describe patients experiences of living with an enterocutaneous fistula. Background. An enterocutaneous fistula is a complex and serious illness that usually occurs as a complication from surgery or spontaneously as a result of an underlying disease. The illness is demanding both physically and mentally and causes substantial medical and nursing problems for the afflicted individual. Design. A descriptive design with a qualitative approach. Methods. In-depth interviews were performed with nine participants who had experiences of living with an enterocutaneous fistula. The analysis was conducted using descriptive phenomenology according to Giorgi. Results. The essence of this study was that living with an enterocutaneous fistula is about handling an illness that causes several limitations in daily life and the following five themes emerged from the data: restrictions in daily life, approaches to illness, emotions, dependence and need of support. A constant fear of leakage from the fistula appliance, being dependent on intravenous fluids and being dependent on health care professionals caused isolation and social restriction. Conclusions. The participants had many strategies for handling their illness. By being well trained, engaged and having a positive and understanding approach, health care professionals can encourage hope, motivation and self-care. This can lead to decreased dependence and help the patient to better handle their illness. Relevance to clinical practice. The competence of health care professionals is essential in the care of patients with an enterocutaneous fistula.

  • 34. Hedberg, B.
    et al.
    Johansson, M
    Cederborg, Ann-Christin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning.
    Communicating stroke survivors' health and further needs for support in care-planning meetings2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 11, p. 1481-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. This study will illustrate how stroke survivors, their relatives and different professionals communicated in care-planning meetings when planning care for patients after their discharge from hospital. We wanted to know what topics participants were talking about, to what extent they were involved in the discussion and how the communication was organized. Background. Communication in health care is sometimes problematic because of the participants' asymmetrical positions when negotiating how to understand the patients' future care. Methods. A qualitative and a quantitative design were adopted with a sample of 14 authentic audio-recorded care-planning meetings. The transcribed meetings were, together with observational notes, analysed from a data-driven approach. Findings. Five topics emerged. The professionals tended to dominate the discourse space even if their involvement varied depending on the topic talked about. The most noteworthy finding was the patients' need of communicative alliances with other participants when negotiating their needs and desires of further care. When making decisions two approaches emerged. The 'aim-driven' approach was characterized by alliances between those participants who seemed to share a common goal for the patient's further care. When the participants used the 'open-minded' approach they merged information and discussed different solutions leading to a goal step by step. Conclusions. The importance of strengthening stroke survivors' participation in care-planning meetings is highlighted. Professionals have to increase their knowledge about how to involve the patients as well as their awareness of how to avoid power struggles between various professionals, patients and relatives. Relevance to clinical practice. This study shows the necessity for professionals to involve relatives when negotiating these patients' need of further care and to learn more about how to advocate stroke survivors. © 2008 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  • 35.
    Hellqvist, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Dizdar Segrell, Nil
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Hagell, Peter
    Kristianstad Univ, Sweden.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sund-Levander, Märtha
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Improving self-management for persons with Parkinsons disease through education focusing on management of daily life: Patients and relatives experience of the Swedish National Parkinson School2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 19-20, p. 3719-3728Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectiveTo identify and describe experiences valuable formanaging daily life after participation in the NPS self-management intervention. The second part was to explore the applicability of the Self- and family management framework by Grey and colleagues for persons with Parkinsons Disease and their relatives. BackgroundThe impact of PD is evident on the lives of both patients and relatives. The National Parkinson School (NPS) is a Swedish self-management programme designed for patients and relatives, aiming at teaching strategies helpful for the ability of self-management, in order to promote life satisfaction. DesignQualitative explorative with inductive and deductive analysis. MethodsFive group discussions with NPS participants were audio-recorded. Verbatim transcriptions were analysed inductively with thematic analysis according to Braun and Clarke, and the findings were then applied deductively to the existing model for patients with chronic disease. ResultsThrough the first step of inductive analysis, three themes capturing the meaning, value and experience of being a participant at the NPS were identified: exchanging experiences and feeling support, adjustment and acceptance of PD for managing daily life and promoting life satisfaction. The deductive analysis applied the inductive findings to the Self- and family management framework of chronically ill to explore the fit to persons with PD and relatives attending the NPS programme. ConclusionsThe NPS programme is a promising approach for helping persons with PD and their relatives to achieve better self-management of disease and improved life satisfaction. Further evaluations of programme outcomes in clinical practice are warranted. Relevance of clinical practiceSelf-management programmes like the NPS is a promising approach in facilitating a positive mindset and outlook on life and gain knowledge to understand, adapt and handle chronic disease, such as PD, better.

  • 36.
    Hernar, Ingvild
    et al.
    Haukeland Hospital, Norway; Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Haltbakk, Johannes
    Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Western Norway University of Appl Science, Norway; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Differences in depression, treatment satisfaction and injection behaviour in adults with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 23-24, p. 4583-4596Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectivesTo assess the prevalence of lipohypertrophy, and to compare differences in external, personal and regimen factors in adults with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy. BackgroundSuboptimal insulin injection behaviour is associated with lipohypertrophy, which may affect insulin absorption and lead to blood glucose fluctuations. Few, if any studies have investigated how external, personal and regimen factors differ in people with type 1 diabetes and different degrees of lipohypertrophy. DesignA cross-sectional study including adults with type 1 diabetes at a diabetes outpatient clinic in a Norwegian university hospital. MethodsParticipants (n=215) were included consecutively at scheduled appointments. Sociodemographic, diabetes and insulin treatment data, and self-report questionnaires concerning patient activation (Patient Activation Measure), depression (Patient Health Questionnaire-2), diabetes distress (Diabetes Distress Scale), type D personality (14-item Type D scale), treatment satisfaction (Insulin Treatment Satisfaction Questionnaire) and motivation (Treatment Self-Regulation Questionnaire), were collected. Lipohypertrophic injection sites were identified by palpation by diabetes specialist nurses. ResultsLipohypertrophy was present in 53% and was more frequent in insulin pen users (63%) compared to insulin pump users (34%). Participants with two or more lipohypertrophic areas had higher depression scores, lower treatment satisfaction with glycaemic control, higher bolus doses and reported suboptimal injection behaviour compared to those with no lipohypertrophic areas. There were no differences in patient activation, diabetes distress, type D personality or motivation between the groups. Discussion and conclusionCompared to pump treatment, pen treatment requires greater awareness of injection technique. Symptoms of depression and lower treatment satisfaction might affect diabetes self-management and glycaemic control, but the association with lipohypertrophy needs further exploration. Relevance to clinical practiceLipohypertrophy is more frequent in insulin pen users compared to pump users. Nurses should focus on injection technique education, and should also consider screening for depressive symptoms and treatment satisfaction as these factors could be associated with development of lipohypertrophy.

  • 37.
    Hjelm, Carina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Dahl, Anna
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Mårtensson, Jan
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Johansson, Boo
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    The influence of heart failure on longitudinal changes in cognition among individuals 80 years of age and older2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 7-8, p. 994-1003Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim.  The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between heart failure and specific cognitive abilities in octogenarians with regard to level and change over time.

    Background.  Cognitive impairment is influenced by many factors, and the impact of heart failure is debated. Intact cognitive ability is crucial for successful self-care in patients with heart failure. Middle-aged patients with heart failure seem to have an increased risk of cognitive impairment. No studies have examined the association between heart failure and longitudinal cognitive changes in octogenarians (individuals 80 years and older).

    Design.  A prospective longitudinal design.

    Methods.  Cognitive tests were carried out five times (1991–2002) in 702 octogenarians from the Swedish Twin Registry, including same-sex twin pairs. The test battery included the measurement of processing speed, visuospatial ability, short-term, episodic and semantic memory. Latent growth curve modelling was employed to measure change and performance over time and compares the group diagnosed with heart failure to individuals without a heart failure diagnosis.

    Results.  At baseline, the participants’ mean age was 83·5 years, 67% were women and 13% suffered from heart failure. Individuals diagnosed with heart failure scored significantly lower in spatial abilities and episodic memory than participants not diagnosed with heart failure. Moreover, measures of episodic memory declined more over time in individuals diagnosed with heart failure. There were no significant differences between the groups in other cognitive tests.

    Conclusion.  Spatial problems and episodic memory have implications for everyday life. This might contribute to decreased adherence to prescribed therapy and self-care management and lead to socio-behavioural problems because of an impaired capacity to drive, read and write.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Nurses should take into account in their assessment that cognitive impairment may restrain elderly heart failure patient’s ability to make decisions and perform self-care actions. Patient education strategies should also be adapted to cognitive ability.

  • 38.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Bard, Karin
    School of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Lund, Sweden.
    Gestational diabetes: prospective interview-study of the developing beliefs about health, illness and health care in migrant women.2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 21-22, p. 3244-3256Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore the development over time of beliefs about health, illness and health care in migrant women with gestational diabetes mellitus born in the Middle East and living in Sweden and to study the influence on self-care and care seeking.

    BACKGROUND: With today's extensive global migration, contact with the new society/health care confronts the migrant's culture of origin with the culture of the host country. The question is whether immigrants' patterns of beliefs about health, illness and health-related behaviour change over time, as no previous studies have been found on this topic.

    DESIGN: A qualitative prospective exploratory study.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews, with 14 women (28-44 years), on three occasions: during pregnancy in gestational weeks 34-38 and three and 14 months after delivery.

    RESULTS:   There was a U-shaped development of beliefs, from focusing on worries about the baby's health during pregnancy and trying to comply with advice from health professionals, particularly a healthy diet, through regression to dietary habits (more sugar, less fibre) and lifestyle held before being diagnosed with gestational diabetes mellitus three months after delivery, back to a healthy diet/lifestyle and worries 14 months after delivery but then focusing on their own risk, as mothers, of developing type 2 diabetes and being unable to care for the child. Over time, the number of persons perceiving gestational diabetes mellitus as a transient condition decreased. Respondents lacked information about gestational diabetes mellitus, diet and follow-ups.

    CONCLUSION: Beliefs changed over time and influenced health-related behaviour. Beliefs about the seriousness of gestational diabetes mellitus among healthcare staff/care organisation influence the development of patients' beliefs and need to be considered in planning care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Pregnancy should be used as an opportunity to provide complete information about gestational diabetes mellitus and future health risks. This should continue after delivery and wishes for regular follow-ups should be met.

  • 39.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, and Department of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Bard, Karin
    Department of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Per
    Department of Caring Sciences, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, Lund University, Sweden.
    Management of gestational diabetes from the patient's perspective: a comparison of Swedish and Middle-Eastern born women2007In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 16, no 1, p. 168-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore patients' evaluation of a specialized diabetes clinic for management of women with gestational diabetes born in Sweden and the Middle East and its contribution to a decreased level of stress and improved coping capability to promote health in patients receiving care.

    BACKGROUND: No studies comparing patients' perceptions of healthcare in women of different origin with gestational diabetes have been found. A perceived clinical problem in specialized diabetes care is of lower activity level in self-care in foreign- than Swedish-born women and the question is whether the healthcare organization is optimal in meeting different individuals' needs.

    DESIGN: Explorative study.

    METHOD: Semi-structured individual interviews by external evaluators.

    PARTICIPANTS: Consecutive sample. Females with gestational diabetes, 13 born in Sweden and 14 born in the Middle East.

    RESULTS: The healthcare model was perceived as functioning well. Swedish women were problem focused and information seeking. Frustration and stress were increased due to perceived delay in information concerning gestational diabetes, limited access to telephone service and lack of confidence in staff because they lacked the expected competence. Control of gestational diabetes and pregnancy by different persons led to perceived lack of holistic care. Women from the Middle East felt cared, had been given the necessary information and claimed to follow advice. Adequate information reduced respondents' anxiety and increased their control over the situation.

    CONCLUSIONS: The clinic needs to be further improved by adapting programmes to persons to become problem focused by giving adequate information immediately.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Cultural differences in coping strategies and attitudes to gestational diabetes need to be considered. Training of staff working with gestational diabetes patients is urgently needed.

  • 40.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Health and Caring Sciences, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Department of Endocrinology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Endocrinology, Skåne University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness in Swedish and African-born women with gestational diabetes living in Sweden2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 9-10, p. 1374-1386Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS: This paper is a report on a study exploring beliefs about health and illness in women with gestational diabetes born in Sweden and Africa living in Sweden. A further aim is to study the influence of beliefs on self-care and care seeking.

    BACKGROUND: Extensive global migration leading to multicultural societies implies challenges to health care. Health/illness beliefs are culturally related and determine health-related behaviour, including self-care, which is crucial in management of gestational diabetes. The risk of developing gestational diabetes is increased in migrants, particularly of African origin, when residing in Western countries. No previous studies, except one, have been found comparing health/illness beliefs in women with gestational diabetes of different origin.

    DESIGN: Exploratory descriptive study.

    METHODS: Semi-structured interviews. Consecutive sample of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes, 13 born in Sweden and 10 born in Africa, from a diabetes clinic in Sweden. Qualitative content analysis of data was applied.

    RESULTS: Beliefs were mainly related to individual and social factors. Health was described as freedom from disease and being healthy. Swedish women perceived heredity and hormonal changes as causing gestational diabetes, avoided work-related stress, had a healthy lifestyle, worried about the baby's health and development of type 2 diabetes, sought information, used more medications and health care and were on sick-leave more often because of pregnancy-related problems than African women, who did not know the cause of gestational diabetes, had a passive self-care attitude and followed prescriptions, often reported being told by staff that gestational diabetes would disappear after delivery and stated more pregnancy-related problems which they treated with rest or watchful waiting.

    CONCLUSIONS: Health/illness beliefs differed and affected self-care and care seeking. Lower risk awareness in African-born women was related to limited knowledge about the body and gestational diabetes, which was further amplified by healthcare professionals informing them about gestational diabetes being transient.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Individual beliefs and risk awareness must be elicited, and adequate information must be given to prevent negative health effects of gestational diabetes.

  • 41.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Carrie
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Pernehed, Sara
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    The experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant - A balancing act, influenced by ambivalent feeling2012In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 21, no 21-22, p. 3297-3305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives.  To explore and describe the experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant.

    Background.  Becoming a grandmother involves a new perspective of life. Grandmothers of sick infants find themselves in a new situation with an adult child undergoing serious stress. Few studies have approached the grandmothers’ own experience of becoming a grandmother to a premature infant.

    Design.  A qualitative content analysis was used.

    Methods.  Eleven women, 52–66 years of age, who were grandmothers to premature infants born at a gestational age of 25–34 weeks, were interviewed during 2010. The infants were less than three years old at the time of the interview. The interviews were analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    Results.  The overall theme was a balancing act. Two categories of experience were identified: emotional experiences and a new role. ‘Emotional experiences’ was related to the first meeting, ambivalent feelings and confidence in care. ‘A new role’ was related to the subcategories supportive, a balance of involvement and limitations.

    Conclusions.  To become a grandmother to a premature infant was experienced as a balancing act influenced by ambivalent feelings of joy, fear and worry. The grandmothers sensed the seriousness of the situation at the same time as they wanted to be happy about the newborn infant. They worried about their adult child’s as well as the premature infant’s health but put their own needs aside. The grandmothers’ new role was a balance between being involved and supportive without disturbing.

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Neonatal intensive care unit staff should be open to grandmothers’ needs and acknowledge them as an obvious support for the immediate family of a premature infant. The grandmothers need guidance and information about what to expect concerning the infants health, the parents situation and their own role.

  • 42.
    Hollman Frisman, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Norrköping.
    Wåhlin, Ingrid
    Intensive Care Department, Kalmar Hospital, Linnaeus University, Kalmar.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Ågren, Susanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Health-promoting conversations: A novel approach to families experiencing critical illness in the ICU environment.2018In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 27, no 3-4, p. 631-639Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to identify and describe the outcomes of a nurse-led intervention, "Health-promoting conversations with families," regarding family functioning and well-being in families with a member who was critically ill.

    BACKGROUND: Families who have a critically ill family member in an intensive care unit face a demanding situation, threatening the normal functioning of the family. Yet, there is a knowledge gap regarding family members' well-being during and after critical illness.

    DESIGN: The study utilized a qualitative inductive-descriptive design.

    METHODS: Eight families participated in health-promoting conversations aimed to create a context for change related to the families' identified problems and resources. Fifteen qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 adults who participated in health-promoting conversations about a critical illness in the family. Eight participants were patients (6 men, 2 women) and 10 were family members (2 male partners, 5 female partners, 1 mother, 1 daughter, 1 female grandchild). The interviews were analyzed by conventional content analysis.

    RESULTS: Family members experienced strengthened togetherness, a caring attitude, and confirmation through health-promoting conversations. The caring and calming conversations were appreciated despite the reappearance of exhausting feelings. Working through the experience and being confirmed promoted family well-being.

    CONCLUSION: Health-promoting conversations were considered to be healing, as the family members take part in sharing each other's feelings, thoughts, and experiences with the critical illness.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Health-promoting conversations could be a simple and effective nursing intervention for former intensive care patients and their families in any cultural context. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Holst, Marie
    et al.
    Malmö Universitet.
    Strömberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Lindholm, Maud
    Malmö universitet.
    Willenheimer, Ronnie
    Lunds universitet.
    Description of self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, symptoms, quality of life and physical capacity in patients with stable chronic heart failure2008In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 17, no 17, p. 2318-2326Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To describe the self-reported fluid intake and its effects on body weight, signs and symptoms of heart failure, quality of life, physical capacity and thirst, in patients with stabilised chronic heart failure. Background. Patients with chronic heart failure are often recommended a fluid restriction of 1.5 l/day but there is no evidence in the literature for this recommendation and little is known about the fluid intake consequences. Design. Crossover study. Methods. Chronic heart failure patients, clinically stabilised after an unstable state, were randomised to a 32-week cross-over study assessing the clinical importance of fluid prescription. In a secondary analysis of 63 patients, efficacy variables were analysed in relation to the self-reported median fluid intake of 19 ml/kg body weight/day. Results. The mean fluid intake was 16 ml/kg/day in the below-median group and 24 ml/kg/day in the above-median group. No between-group differences were found in change in body weight, signs and symptoms, diuretic use, quality of life or physical capacity. However, the above-median group significantly decreased sense of thirst and difficulties to adhere to the fluid prescription compared with the below-median group. Conclusion. In clinically stabilised chronic heart failure patients on optimal pharmacological treatment, a larger fluid intake was associated with decreasing thirst without any measurable negative effects on signs and symptoms of heart failure, diuretic use or physical capacity. Thus, a more liberal fluid intake may be advisable in chronic heart failure patients who have been stabilised after an initial unstable clinical state. Relevance to clinical practice. Nurses involved in the care for patients with heart failure known how troublesome thirst can be and how difficult it can be to follow a restricted fluid intake. This study indicates that it is possible to reassess and recommend a less strict fluid intake in stabilised patients with chronic heart failure. © 2008 The Authors.

  • 44.
    Hultsjö, Sally
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov County Council, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Wärdig, Rikard
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rytterström, Patrik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences.
    The borderline between life and death: Mental healthcare professionals' experience of why patients commit suicide during ongoing care2019In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 28, no 9-10, p. 1623-1632Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore mental health professionals' experiences in regard to circumstances that cause the patient to take their own life during ongoing care.

    BACKGROUND: Suicide is a worldwide health problem, and of those who take their own life, nearly 20% have had contact with a psychiatric unit. Mental health professionals may have extended intuitive knowledge that has not been made visible. Mental health professionals' experiences can contribute knowledge that can complement suicide risk assessments and can be helpful in developing approaches and strategies where the hope is to identify and draw attention to people at risk of taking their own life.

    DESIGN: A reflective lifeworld research.

    METHODS: Twelve interviews with mental health professionals with experience of working in caring relationships with patients that had taken their life during the period of care. The study was performed in accordance with COREQ (see Supporting Information Data S1).

    RESULTS: Mental health professionals' experiences regarding circumstances that cause the patient to take their own life are related to the patient's life circumstances that led to a loss of dignity, and finally beyond retrieval. Mental health professionals share patients' struggle to choose between life and death, the darkness of their life and their hopeless situation. This shared experience also makes the mental health professionals wish to relieve patient's suffering but also gives them an understanding of why patients take their own life.

    CONCLUSIONS: The mental health professionals experience how the patient loses the possibility of living a worthwhile life, recognise darkness within the patient and see how the patient's life is fragile. Suicide described as logical and expected, based on their life and life circumstances, has not been found in previous research. Bearing this in mind, should psychiatric care focus on a proactive approach and act when these circumstances are identified?

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The Mental health professionals' tacit knowledge may be used to strengthen uncertain suicide assessments.

    The full text will be freely available from 2019-12-27 08:59
  • 45.
    Hälleberg Nyman, Maria
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences, Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Forsman, Henrietta
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    Ostaszkiewicz, Joan
    School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Hommel, Ami
    Faculty of Health and Society, Department of Care Science, Malmö University, Malmö, Sweden; Department of Orthopaedics, Skaane University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden; ivision of Nursing, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Urinary incontinence and its management in patients aged 65 and older in orthopaedic care: what nursing and rehabilitation staff know and do2017In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 26, no 21-22, p. 3345-3353Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe what nursing and rehabilitation staff know and do with regard to urinary incontinence and risk of urinary incontinence in patients 65 years or older undergoing hip surgery.

    BACKGROUND: Urinary incontinence is a common but often neglected issue for older people. Despite the existence of evidence-based guidelines on how to assess, manage and prevent urinary incontinence, there are indications that these guidelines are not applied in hospital care.

    DESIGN: A qualitative study with descriptive design was conducted in two orthopaedic units.

    METHODS: Forty-six interviews and 36 observations of care were conducted from January-October 2014 and analysed with qualitative content analysis.

    RESULTS: Enrolled nurses performed most of the care related to bladder function, with focus on urinary catheterisation and preventing urinary tract infection and urinary retention. Registered nurses' role in urinary matters mainly comprised documentation, while the rehabilitation staff focused on making it possible for the patient to be independent in toileting. The nursing staff considered urinary incontinence a common condition for older people and that it was convenient for the patients to have an indwelling catheter or incontinence pad/pant, although they acknowledged some of the risks associated with these procedures.

    CONCLUSIONS: Urinary incontinence is not a priority in orthopaedic care, and urinary incontinence guidelines are not applied. Further, attitudes and actions are mainly characterised by a lack of urinary incontinence knowledge and the nursing and rehabilitation staff do not take a team approach to preventing and managing urinary incontinence.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: An increased focus on knowledge on urinary incontinence and evidence-based guidelines is needed. To secure evidence-based practice, the team of nursing and rehabilitation staff and managers must be aligned and work actively together, also including the patient in the team.

  • 46.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Post-operative patients in severe pain but satisfied with pain relief.2002In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 841-842Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 47.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Ehrenberg, A.
    Health and Caring Sciences, Dalarna University, Falun Campus, Falun, Sweden.
    Nursing documentation of postoperative pain management2002In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 734-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Previous studies have shown that nursing documentation is often deficient in its recording of pain assessment and treatment. In Sweden, documentation of the care process, including assessment, is a legal obligation. • The aim of this study was to describe nursing documentation of postoperative pain management and nurses' perceptions of the records in relation to current regulations and guidelines. • The sample included nursing records of postoperative care on the second postoperative day from 172 patients and 63 Registered Nurses from surgical wards in a central county hospital in Sweden. • The records were reviewed for content and comprehensiveness based on regulations and guidelines for postoperative pain management. Three different auditing instruments were used. The nurses were asked if the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. • The result showed that pain assessment was based mainly on patients' self-report, but less than 10% of the records contained notes on systematic assessment with a pain assessment instrument. Pain location was documented in 50% of the records and pain character in 12%. About 73% of the nurses reported that the documentation concurred with current regulations and guidelines. • The findings indicate that significant flaws existed in nurses' recording of postoperative pain management, of which the nurses were not aware. © 2002 Blackwell Science Ltd.

  • 48.
    Ingadottir, Brynja
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson Stark, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Leino-Kilpi, Helena
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Sigurdardottir, Arun K
    University of Akureyri, Iceland .
    Valkeapää, Kirsi
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The fulfilment of knowledge expectations during the perioperative period of patients undergoing knee arthroplasty - a Nordic perspective2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2896-2908Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To describe the possible differences between knowledge expectations and received knowledge of patients undergoing elective knee arthroplasty in Iceland, Sweden and Finland and also to determine the relationship between such a difference and both background factors and patient satisfaction with care.

    BACKGROUND: Knee arthroplasty is a fast-growing and a successful treatment for patients with osteoarthritis. Patient education can improve surgery outcomes, but it remains unknown what knowledge patients expect to receive and actually acquire during the perioperative period and what factors are related to that experience.

    DESIGN: Descriptive, prospective survey.

    METHODS: In total, 290 patients answered questionnaires about their expectations (Knowledge Expectations of hospital patients - scale) before surgery and about received knowledge (Received Knowledge of hospital patients - scale) and satisfaction with hospital care (Patient Satisfaction Scale) at discharge. Sociodemographics, clinical information, accessibility to knowledge from healthcare providers (Access to Knowledge Scale), and preferences for information and behavioural control (Krantz Health Opinion Survey) were collected as background data.

    RESULTS: Patients` knowledge expectations were higher (mean 3·6, SD 0·4) than their perception of received knowledge (mean 3·0, SD 0·7). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that access to knowledge, information preferences and work experience within health- or social care explained 33% (R²) of the variation in the difference between received and expected knowledge. Patients reported high satisfaction with their care except regarding how their family was involved.

    CONCLUSION: Patients undergoing knee arthroplasty receive less knowledge than they expect, and individual factors and communication with healthcare providers during hospitalisation are related to their experience. The content of patient education and family involvement should be considered in future care.

    RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: The results strengthen the knowledge base on the educational needs of knee arthroplasty patients and can be used to develop and test new interventions.

  • 49.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Skaraborgs Hospital, Sweden.
    Adamson, Anita
    Skaraborgs Hospital, Sweden.
    Ejdeback, Jan
    Skaraborgs Hospital, Sweden.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease - a randomised intervention study2014In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 23, no 19-20, p. 2822-2834Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims and objectives. To evaluate the effectiveness of an individualised programme to promote self-care in sleep-activity in patients with coronary artery disease. Background. Recent scientific findings have shown that low physical exercise and stress interfere with coronary artery disease patients sleep quality and sleep efficiency independent of gender, age and co-morbidity. Design. A randomised pretest-post-test control design. Methods. Forty-seven patients who had undergone a coronary revascularisation procedure and/or pharmacological treatment three to seven weeks earlier at a general hospital were randomised to either an intervention group or a control group. Data collection was carried out by questionnaires, a study-specific sleep diary and actigraphy registration for 10 consecutive 24-hour periods, with a follow-up after three to four months. The intervention group underwent a nurse-led individualised education programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity. Sleep habits and sleep-related lifestyle together formed the basis for setting up individual goals together with the nurse. Individual advice on physical training, relaxation exercise and a CD-based relaxation programme was provided by a physiotherapist. Both groups received a brochure about sleep and stress. Results. At a three-to four-month follow-up, the main improvements were seen in the intervention group regarding sleep quality, sleep duration and sleep efficiency in the sleep diary and sleep efficiency in actigraphy. Statistical improvements in health-related quality of life were revealed. This was not so obvious in the control group. Conclusions. An individualised intervention programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity including relaxation in patients with coronary artery disease led by a nurse may improve sleep quality. However, a longitudinal study to promote self-care in sleep-activity should be performed using a larger sample and multiple sites with continuous follow-ups to determine whether any positive effects remain stable over time. Relevance to clinical practice. Implementation of a multiprofessional individualised programme to promote self-care of sleep-activity including relaxation based on patients needs, supported by a healthcare team and led by nurses, is important in clinical practice.

  • 50.
    Johansson, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svanborg, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Neurophysiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Neurophysiology UHL.
    Swahn, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Cardiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Cardiology UHL.
    Ejdebäck, Jan
    Hjärtkliniken, Kärnsjukhuset i Skövde.
    Tygesen, Hans
    Hjärt-och lungkliniken, Södra Älvsborgs Sjukhus, Borås.
    Edéll-Gustafsson, Ulla
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sleep, arousal and health-related quality of life in men and women with coronary artery disease.2011In: Journal of Clinical Nursing, ISSN 0962-1067, E-ISSN 1365-2702, Vol. 20, no 19-20, p. 2787-2801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim. To evaluate whether there are gender differences in insomnia, sleep quality, sleep efficiency (%), general arousal, disease-specific and health-related quality of life in patients with coronary artery disease, compared with an age- and gender-matched randomly selected group from the general population.

    Background.  There are gender difference effects of sleep disturbances in the general population, but this perspective among patients with coronary artery disease has been poorly analysed.

    Design.  In this prospective study, comparative, descriptive and model testing designs were used.

    Method.  The patients with coronary artery disease, 556 men and 324 women aged 25–86, were compared with a matched population-based group. Data were collected by validated and reliability-tested questionnaires.

    Results.  The prevalence of severe insomnia varied between 17–44% in all four groups. The severe insomniac coronary artery disease patients displayed a two- or threefold higher presleep arousal, had two hours shorter nocturnal sleep duration/night and were more limited in their physical exercise level than the population-based group. Gender differences in sleep quality, sleep efficiency (%) and general arousal disappeared with increased insomnia severity.

    Conclusions.  Independent of gender, age and comorbidity, physical exercise, general arousal behaviour and delayed poststress recovery after mental stress were found to have a negative impact on the coronary artery disease patients’ sleep quality and sleep efficiency (%), interfering with their health-related quality of life. The variables significantly explained 41% of the sleep quality outcome and 29% of the sleep efficiency (%).

    Relevance to clinical practice.  Insomnia because of hyperarousal behaviour can be an important factor in the development of an individual self-care management programme supported by a healthcare team.

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