liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Barimani, M.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berlin, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Childbirth and parenting preparation in antenatal classes2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 57Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: to describe topics (1) presented by midwives during antenatal classes and the amount of time spent on these topics and (2) raised and discussed by first-time parents and the amount of time spent on these topics. Design: qualitative; data were gathered using video or tape recordings and analysed using a three-pronged content analysis approach, i.e., conventional, summative, and directed analyses. Setting and participants: 3 antenatal courses in 2 antenatal units in a large Swedish city; 3 midwives; and 34 course participants. Findings: class content focused on childbirth preparation (67% of the entire antenatal course) and on parenting preparation (33%). Childbirth preparation facilitated parents understanding of the childbirth process, birthing milieu, the partners role, what could go wrong during delivery, and pain relief advantages and disadvantages. Parenting preparation enabled parents to (i) plan for those first moments with the newborn; (ii) care for/physically handle the infant; (iii) manage breastfeeding; (iv) manage the period at home immediately after childbirth; and (v) maintain their relationship. During the classes, parents expressed concerns about what could happened to newborns. Parents questions to midwives and discussion topics among parents were evenly distributed between childbirth preparation (52%) and parenting preparation (48%). Key conclusions: childbirth preparation and pain relief consumed 67% of course time. Parents particularly reflected on child issues, relationship, sex, and anxiety. Female and male participants actively listened to the midwives, appeared receptive to complex issues, and needed more time to ask questions. Parents appreciated the classes yet needed to more information for managing various post-childbirth situations. Implications for practice: while midwifery services vary among hospitals, regions, and countries, midwives might equalise content focus, offer classes in the second trimester, provide more time for parents to talk to each other, allow time in the course plan for parents to bring up new topics, and investigate: (i) ways in which antenatal course development and planning can improve; (ii) measures for evaluating courses; (iii) facilitator training; and (iv) parent satisfaction surveys.

  • 2.
    Bodin, Maja
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Humanistiskt Centre, Sweden.
    Stern, Jenny
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Käll, Lisa
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Arts and Humanities. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Humanistiskt Centre, Sweden.
    Tyden, Tanja
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Coherence of pregnancy planning within couples expecting a child2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 10, p. 973-978Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: joint planning and decision-making within couples have evident effects on the well-being of the family. The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of pregnancy planning among pregnant women and their partners and to compare the coherence of pregnancy planning within the couples. Methods: pregnant women and their partners were recruited from 18 antenatal clinics in seven Swedish counties between October 2011 and April 2012. Participants, 232 pregnant women and 144 partners, filled out a questionnaire with questions about pregnancy planning, lifestyle and relationship satisfaction. 136 couples were identified and the womens and partners answers were compared. Results: more than 75% of the pregnancies were very or rather planned and almost all participants had agreed with their partner to become pregnant There was no significant difference in level of pregnancy planning between women and partners, and coherence within couples was strong. Level of planning was not affected by individual socio-demographic variables. Furthermore, 98 % of women and 94 % of partners had non distressed relationships. Conclusion: one of the most interesting results was the strong coherence between partners concerning their pregnancy and relationship. Approaching these results from a social constructivist perspective brings to light an importance of togetherness and how a sense and impression of unity within a couple might be constructed in different ways. As implications for practice, midwives and other professionals counselling persons in fertile age should enquire about and emphasise the benefits of equality and mutual pregnancy planning for both women and men. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Cedergren, Marie
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Brynhildsen, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Jeppsson, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Sydsjö, Adam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Consumer satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme for obese pregnant women.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 163-167Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to investigate women's attitudes and satisfaction with a weight-gain intervention programme during pregnancy.

    Design: exploratory, descriptive study. Data were collected via interviews.

    Setting: University hospital.

    Participants: 56 obese pregnant women who attended antenatal care at the University Hospital of Linköping's obstetrical department and took part in an intervention programme aimed at reducing weight gain during pregnancy, between November 2003 and August 2004.

    Findings: the interviews comprised several questions concerning attitudes and opinions of the programme. Most of the women expressed positive experiences with the treatment and would attend the programme if they became pregnant again. Most of the women stated that they had changed their eating and exercise habits during pregnancy, and almost all of them had continued with these new habits. Even though the weight gain goal of a maximum 6.9 kg was reached by less than half of the participants, most of the women were satisfied with their weight gain. A total of 71.4% of the women participated in aqua aerobics classes. They stated that they were most satisfied with this form of exercise, and that it also was a good social experience.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice: a pregnant woman herself must be actively involved in setting her own goals to prevent excessive weight gain during pregnancy. Considerable effort and support must be placed on discussing strategies, pitfalls and risks. In order for the woman to maintain the change in attitude and habits, she must probably be given continuous feedback and reinforcement over the long term.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 4.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Weight six years after childbirth: a follow-up of obese women in a weight-gain restriction programmme2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 5, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to compare weight development in an intervention group and a control group, six years after participation in a gestational weight-gain restriction programme.

    DESIGN: follow-up of a prospective intervention study.

    SETTINGS: antenatal care clinics.

    PARTICIPANTS: a total of 129 women (88.4%) from the original intervention group and 166 women (88.8%) from the original control group.

    MEASUREMENTS: the women answered a study specific questionnaire, covering socio-demographic data and health- and weight status.

    FINDINGS: after adjusting for socio-demographic factors, the mean weight was lower (4.1kg) among the women in the intervention group, compared to the controls (p=0.028). Furthermore, the mean weight change, e.g. the weight at the six year assessment compared with the weight at the start of the intervention at the first antenatal care visit, was greater in the intervention group than in the control group. The women in the intervention group had a larger mean weight change (-5.2kg), e.g. weighed less than the women in the control group (-1.9kg) (p=0.046). Mean weight change expressed in 5kg classes also showed a significant difference between the two groups (p=0.030).

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: the results indicate that attending a gestational weight-gain-restriction programme can have a positive effect on weight up to six years after the intervention.

    IMPLICATION FOR PRACTISE: a restrictive gestational weight gain can result in a positive weight development during the first years after childbirth. It might provide both short- and long term medical health benefits for the mother as well as the child.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 5.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Klein, Sofia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics UHL.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Physical activity and psychological well-being in obese pregnant and postpartum women attending a weight-gain restriction programme2014In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 30, no 1, p. 11-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    the objective of the study was to compare the differences in psychological well-being and quality of life during pregnancy and post partum of obese physically active women and obese physically inactive women enroled in a weight gain restriction programme. We also wanted to explore whether physical activity influences weight change or health status during pregnancy.

    Design

    a prospective intervention study.

    Setting

    antenatal care clinic.

    Participants

    a total of 74 obese pregnant women in a physically active group and 79 obese women in a physically inactive group.

    Measurements

    the women kept diaries of their physical activity during pregnancy and answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory, the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale and Medical Study Short-Form Health Survey in gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks post partum. Physical activity was measured in metabolic equivalents.

    Findings

    the physically active women experienced fewer depressive symptoms and estimated an improved quality of life during their pregnancies as measured by physical functioning, bodily pain, social functioning, role limitations due to emotional problems and general mental health as compared with the physically inactive women. There were no differences between the groups in gestational weight gain or weight change from early pregnancy to post partum or in prevalence of complications.

    Key conclusions

    physical activity among obese pregnant women provides better psychological well-being and improved quality of life, but does not prevent weight change.

    Implications for practice

    staff at Antenatal Care Clinics that face obese pregnant women, should encourage and emphasise the benefits of being physically active throughout pregnancy.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 6.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Myrgård, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Primary Care Center, Child Health unit. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine.
    Wallberg, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Blomberg, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Pregnant womens intention to breastfeed; their estimated extent and duration of the forthcoming breastfeeding in relation to the actual breastfeeding in the first year postpartum-A Swedish cohort study2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 76, p. 102-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the prenatal intention to breastfeed and the estimated extent and duration of the forthcoming breastfeeding among nulliparous and multiparous women in different Body Mass Index (BMI) classes. Furthermore, in a sub-group we study the actual breastfeeding in relation to the prenatal intended extent and duration. Design: A prospective cohort study. Methods: A total of 775 pregnant women answered a questionnaire concerning their intention to breastfeed and how they estimated the extent and duration of the forthcoming breastfeeding. In a sub-group of 174 women, data from the actual breastfeeding were obtained. Findings: There was no difference concerning intention to breastfeed among underweight and normal weight women, overweight or obese nulliparous or multiparous women. Fewer multiparous women with BMI amp;lt;25 judged that the forthcoming breastfeeding would be partial, compared to multiparous women with overweight and obesity (p = 0.003). Furthermore, there was a significant difference within the group of nulliparous women concerning the prenatal intended extent and the actual breastfeeding at two weeks and five months postnatally (p = 0.000 and p = 0.041). There were more underweight and normal weight and overweight women who breastfed exclusively two weeks postnatally, compared with obese women. Additional, at five months postnatally there were more obese women who had ceased to breastfeed, than underweight and normal weight women. Conclusions: Among pregnant multiparous women there were more overweight and obese women who judged that the forthcoming breastfeeding would be partial, than pregnant underweight and normal weight women. The prenatal estimated extent of the forthcoming breastfeeding differed from the actually extent of breastfeeding among nulliparous women. Implications for practice: The antenatal breastfeeding information and education should be tailored to prepare every woman/couple, irrespective of maternal body composition for the forthcoming task and furthermore, the continuum of care, from antenatal care to Child Health Service should offer a supportive atmosphere to protect and promote breastfeeding (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-30 08:07
  • 7.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Bard, Karin
    Department of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness postpartum in women born in Sweden and the Middle East2009In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 25, no 5, p. 564-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to explore beliefs about health and illness three months postpartum in women born in Sweden and the Middle East, and to study whether they perceive gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) as a prediabetic condition.

    DESIGN: an explorative study using semi-structured interviews 3 months postpartum.

    SETTING: in-hospital diabetes specialist clinic in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: interviews three months after birth. Consecutive sample of women with GDM; 13 born in Sweden and 14 born in the Middle East.

    MEASUREMENT AND FINDINGS: irrespective of origin, health was focused on well-being and being able to care for the baby. Many Middle Eastern women did not know how long GDM would last or said that they had been informed by staff about its transience. They worried about still having diabetes mellitus (DM), which directed them to self-monitoring of blood glucose and the desire for health-care staff to verify the disease. They showed tendencies to dietary changes. Swedish-born women feared development of type 2 DM and had undertaken active health-related behaviour.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: beliefs about health and illness differ, change and affect awareness of risk and self-care practice postpartum. Swedish women showed high risk awareness with changes in life style and the desire for more information to avoid developing DM. Middle Eastern women showed increased risk awareness and sought help from staff in checking whether GDM was present in the postpartum period.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: it is important to recognise that Middle Eastern women, in contrast to Swedish-born women, have not incorporated the message that GDM is a risk marker for future development of DM. Health professionals have a significant role in supporting women and their families undergoing the transition to motherhood, particularly migrants in a new country. Identifying individual beliefs is of crucial importance. Pre-existing baby health clinics can be developed to address mothers' needs as well as the health of the baby.

  • 8.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, and Department of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Bard, Karin
    Department of Health Science and Social Work, University of Växjö, Sweden.
    Nyberg, Per
    Department of Neuroscience, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Internal Medicine, Lund University Hospital, Sweden.
    Swedish and Middle-Eastern-born women's beliefs about gestational diabetes2005In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 44-60Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to compare beliefs about health and illness between women born in Sweden and the Middle East who developed gestational diabetes (GD).

    DESIGN: a qualitative, explorative study using semi-structured interviews.

    SETTING: in-hospital diabetes specialist clinic in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: consecutive sample of women with GD; 13 born in Sweden and 14 born in the Middle East.

    MEASUREMENT AND FINDINGS: all the women described health as freedom from disease, and expressed worries for the baby's health and well-being. Women from the Middle East did not know the cause of GD, discussed the influence of social factors, such as being an immigrant, and supernatural factors, tried to adapt to the disease and thought it would disappear after birth, felt they had more pregnancy-related complications but had not received any treatment. Swedish women attributed GD to inheritance, environment and hormonal change, feared developing Type 2 diabetes, found work-related stress harmful to their health, more often sought help, used medications against pregnancy-related complications, and were more often on sick-leave from work.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: Swedish women initiated a battle against GD, demanded medical treatment for pregnancy-related complications because of gainful employment and viewed pregnancy as a disease. Women from the Middle East temporarily adapted to the disease and perceived pregnancy and related problems as a natural part of life.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: it is important to assess individual beliefs, risk awareness and to meet individual needs for information.

  • 9.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    et al.
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Berntorp, Kerstin
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Frid, Anders
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Åberg, Anders
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Lund University Hospital, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Apelqvist, Jan
    Department of Endocrinology, Malmö University Hospital, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Beliefs about health and illness in women managed for gestational diabetes in two organisations.2008In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 168-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to explore beliefs about health, illness and health care in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) managed in two different organisations based on diabetology or obstetrics.

    DESIGN: an explorative qualitative study using semi-structured interviews.

    SETTING: clinic A: a specialist diabetes clinic with regular contact with a diabetologist and antenatal care provided by a midwife; clinic B: a specialist maternity clinic providing regular contact with a midwife, a structured programme for self-monitoring of blood glucose and insulin treatment, and a 1-day diabetes class by an obstetrician, a diabetologist, a midwife and a dietician. The clinics were located at two different university hospitals in Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS: a consecutive sample of Swedish women diagnosed with GDM; 13 managed in clinic A and 10 managed in clinic B.

    MEASUREMENT AND FINDINGS: women described their perceptions of as well-being, being healthy and freedom from disease. All respondents reported a delay in the provision of information about GMD and an information gap about GDM and the management of the condition, from diagnosis until the start of treatment at the specialist clinic. Respondents from clinic A expressed fear about future development of type 2 diabetes. Women from clinic B discussed different causes of GDM, and many claimed that health-care staff informed them that GDM was a transient condition during pregnancy. Respondents from clinic A reported a conflict in their treatment of pregnancy and GDM as two different conditions.

    KEY CONCLUSIONS: beliefs differed and were related to the health-care model chosen. Women with GDM monitored at a specialist maternity clinic believed GDM to be a transient condition during pregnancy only, whereas women monitored at a diabetes specialist clinic expressed fear about a future risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: relevant information about GDM should be provided without delay after initial diagnosis and thereafter repeatedly. It is important to recognise the context of information given on GDM, as it will substantially influence the beliefs and attitudes of women towards GDM as a transient condition during pregnancy or as a potential risk factor for diabetes.

  • 10.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Approaches to assessment of alcohol intake during pregnancy in Swedish maternity care-a national-based investigation into midwives' alcohol-related education, knowledge and practice2010In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 430-434Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: to evaluate how much education midwives in Sweden have undertaken to help them assess alcohol intake during pregnancy, and what tools they use to identify women who may be at risk of drinking during pregnancy. DESIGN: a national survey was conducted in March 2006, using a questionnaire constructed by a Swedish team of researchers and clinicians. SETTING: maternity health-care centres in Sweden. PARTICIPANT: 2106 midwives. FINDINGS: nearly all midwives stated that they had excellent or good knowledge concerning the risks associated with drinking during pregnancy. They considered themselves less knowledgeable about detecting pregnant women with risky alcohol consumption before pregnancy. The majority of the midwives had participated in some education in handling risky drinking. Almost half of the midwives assessed women's alcohol intake before pregnancy. Important facilitators for increased activity concerned recommendations and decisions at different levels (national, local and management) on how to address alcohol with expectant parents and work with risky drinkers. KEY CONCLUSIONS: more education was associated with more common use of a questionnaire for assessment of women's alcohol intake before pregnancy, and more frequent counselling when identifying a pregnant woman whose pre-pregnancy consumption was risky.

  • 11.
    Ledenfors, Anna
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    First-time fathers' experiences of normal childbirth2016In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 40, p. 26-31Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To identify and describe first-time fathers' experiences of normal childbirth.

    Design

    A qualitative interview study using a thematic analysis for analysing the transcripts.

    Participants

    purposeful sampling was used. Eight men were interviewed two to six months after experiencing childbirth. Participants were men who had become fathers for the first time.

    Setting

    A county located in the middle of Sweden covering both urban and rural areas.

    Findings

    The analysis resulted in one major theme – a transformative experience – with four sub-themes: preparing for childbirth, feeling vulnerable in a new situation, being confirmed as part of a unit, and meeting their child for the first time.

    Key conclusions

    The findings indicate that the needs of prospective fathers should be given more recognition during childbirth. The findings also show that the midwife is an important person for prospective fathers, both before and during the birth.

    Implications for practice

    The findings of the study show what affects first-time fathers' experiences of childbirth. By listening to fathers and recognising them as part of a unit with the woman giving birth, midwifes can support them and increase their participation. Thereby, they can find their role in an unfamiliar situation and thus have a positive experience of childbirth.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 12.
    Lindqvist, Maria
    et al.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Persson, Margareta
    Department of Nursing, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Margareta
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Obstetrics and Gynecology, Umeå University, Sweden.
    Uustal, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Lindberg, Inger
    Luleå University of Technology, Department of Health Science, Division of Nursing, and Sunderby Research Unit, Umeå University, Sweden.
    ‘A worse nightmare than expected’: a Swedish qualitative study of women's experiences two months after obstetric anal sphincter muscle injury2018In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 61, p. 22-28Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    this study explores women's experiences of the first two months after obstetric anal sphincter injury (OASIS) during childbirth with a focus on problematic recovery.

    Methods

    this qualitative study used inductive qualitative content analysis to investigate open-ended responses from 1248 women. The data consists of short and comprehensive written responses to open-ended questions focusing on recovery in the national quality register, the Perineal Laceration Register, two months after OASIS at childbirth.

    Results

    the theme ‘A worse nightmare than expected’ illustrated women's experiences of their life situation. Pain was a constant reminder of the trauma, and the women had to face physical and psychological limitations as well as crushed expectations of family life. Furthermore, navigating healthcare services for help added further stress to an already stressful situation.

    Conclusions

    we found that women with problematic recovery two months after OASIS experienced their situation as a worse nightmare than expected. Extensive pain resulted in physical and psychological limitations, and crushed expectations of family life. Improved patient information for women with OASIS regarding pain, psychological and personal aspects, sexual function, and subsequent pregnancy delivery is needed. Also, there is a need for clear organizational structures and information to guide help-seeking women to needed care.

  • 13.
    Lingetun, Lovisa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fungbrant, Madicken
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Baggens, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    'I just want to be normal' - A qualitative study of pregnant women's blogs who present themselves as overweight or obese2017In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 49, p. 65-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to describe what pregnant women who present themselves as overweight or obese write about their pregnancy in their blogs.

    Setting: Swedish private blogs.

    Design: a qualitative study, using 13 Internet blogs as the source of data. Google was used to find the blogs. The blog content was analysed using thematic analysis.

    Findings: three main themes were identified: Pregnancy as an excuse, Perspectives on the pregnant body and Becoming a mother. The pregnancy was used as an excuse for breaking the norms, ‘I am normal because I am pregnant’, and gaining weight, ‘I normalise my weight and weight gain’. The women expressed different perspectives of their body through ‘ For me it is important to look pregnant’, ‘How others seem to see me’ and ‘Labelled a risk pregnancy at the antenatal care’. The transition to motherhood was described in ‘How the pregnancy affects my life’, and there was disappointment when the women experienced ‘Unmet expectations’.

    Key conclusion: the women described themselves as normal behind the obesity and saw their pregnancy as an excuse for their body size and behaviour. They did not identify themselves as a risk group and they did not recognise the midwife's support during the pregnancy.

    Implication for practice: midwives may have to address overweight and obese pregnant women's attitude towards weight and weight gain in weight gain interventions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 14.
    MacAdam, Ruth
    et al.
    Kvinnokliniken Örebro.
    Huuva, Elisabeth
    Kvinnokliniken, Universitetssjukhuset Örebro.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fathers' experiences after having a child: sexuality becomes tailored according to circumstances2011In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 27, no 5, p. e149-e155Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to identify and describe men’s experiences of sexuality after having a child.

    Design

    a qualitative study using an interpretative phenomenological approach for analysing in-depth interviews.

    Participants

    purposeful sampling was used. 12 men were interviewed six to 13 months after having a child. Informants were men who became fathers for the first time or had already fathered a child.

    Setting

    a mid-sized town located in the centre of Sweden.

    Findings

    four themes became apparent; a new way of closeness due to non-existing sexuality immediately after birth, an expression of sexuality influenced by the consequences of caring for a child, the expression of love and consideration taking priority over sexual activities, and the father’s expression of sexuality being limited by the lack of reciprocation from the partner.

    Key conclusions

    after having a child, the expression of sexuality became subjective to the change in circumstances. Sexuality itself was not experienced any differently, but the expression of sexuality for the fathers was modified depending on how the circumstances presented themselves. Sexuality was extended to different avenues of expression where a sense of belonging evolved and a display of love and affection preceded sexual activities.

    Implications for practice

    it is important that health care professionals are aware that as sexuality can have various avenues of expression after having a child it is important to not only focus on providing information regarding sexual activities. Fathers should be involved in discussions about possible circumstances affecting sexuality to be able to prepare accordingly.

    Download full text (pdf)
    fulltext
  • 15.
    Malmquist, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jonsson, Louise
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wikstrom, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nieminen, Katri
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Norrköping.
    Minority stress adds an additional layer to fear of childbirth in lesbian and bisexual women, and transgender people2019In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 79, article id UNSP 102551Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To explore and describe thoughts about and experiences of pregnancy, childbirth and reproductive healthcare in lesbian and bisexual women and transgender people (LBT) with an expressed fear of childbirth (FOC). Design: Data were collected through semi-structured interviews with self-identified LBTs with an expressed FOC. Participants: 17 self-identified LBTs participated. 15 had an expressed FOC, and two were non-afraid partners. Findings: Participants fears were similar to those previously described in research on FOC, e.g., fear of pain, injury, blood, death of the child or of the parent. However, minority stress, including fear and experiences of prejudicial treatment, in maternity care and at delivery wards add an additional layer to the fear of childbirth. Key conclusions: LBTs with FOC are a particularly vulnerable group of patients, whose needs must be addressed in healthcare. Implication for practice: The findings call attention to the need for LBT-competent treatment prior to, and throughout pregnancy and childbirth. In the most vulnerable patients, caregivers must work extensively to build trust, in order to explore and reduce FOC. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-10-01 12:46
  • 16.
    Molander, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Routine ultrasound examination during pregnancy: a world of possibilities.2010In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, p. 18-26Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    to identify and describe the meaning of the routine ultrasound scan to pregnant women.

    Design

    a qualitative descriptive study using a grounded theory approach, with individual interviews to collect data.

    Setting

    three antenatal clinics in a Swedish county of approximately 400,000 inhabitants.

    Participants

    voluntary samples of 10 pregnant Swedish women, 26–38 years of age, were interviewed prior to their first routine ultrasound.

    Findings

    ‘making it possible’ was the core category that explained and illustrated the meaning of the scan. The core category showed that the women considered the examination to be filled with possibilities to reach different goals during pregnancy. It also explained the categories: ultrasound as an event; ultrasound as a situation; ultrasound as a test; and the effects of ultrasound; as well as how they related to each other. The findings are considered the beginning of a theory concerning the meaning of the first ultrasound to pregnant women.

    Key conclusions and implications for practice

    pregnant women can see their first ultrasound as a tool that enables them to reach different goals during their pregnancy. Many of the goals concern meeting and connecting with the baby, suggesting that pregnant women consider the examination an important step towards parenthood. An ultrasound examination offered for medical reasons, which has other meanings than the intended for pregnant women, is important knowledge. It can be useful when giving information about the scan, addressing the woman during the examination, and for understanding and handling possible reactions.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 17.
    Salomonsson, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Alehagen, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Swedish midwives' perceptions of fear of childbirth2010In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 327-337Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: to describe midwives' experiences with, and perceptions of, women with fear of childbirth. DESIGN: a qualitative study with a phenomenographic approach. Data were collected by means of interviews in focus groups. SETTING: four focus groups at four types of hospital in Southern Sweden over a period of 18 months, 2004-2006. PARTICIPANTS: 21 experienced midwives. FINDINGS: four description categories emerged, i.e. appearance of fear of childbirth, origins of fear of childbirth, consequences of fear of childbirth, and fear of childbirth and midwifery care. KEY CONCLUSION: fear of childbirth is seen as a continuum from normal to irrational, severe fear. It has various origins which are more or less difficult to operationalise. Fear of childbirth influences the experience of pregnancy, the labour process and the transition to parenthood. Midwifery care of women with fear of childbirth is emotionally demanding and time consuming. Aspects of care required early identification of women with fear of childbirth, individual care, preparation for giving birth, support of a companion during labour, and postpartum follow-up.  

  • 18.
    Shorey, Shefaly
    et al.
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    He, Hong-Gu
    National University of Singapore, Singapore.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Skin-to-skin contact by fathers and the impact on infant and paternal outcomes: an integrative review2016In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 40, p. 207-217Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    to summarise research evidence on the impact of father-infant skin-to-skin contact on infant and paternal outcomes.

    DESIGN:

    an integrative literature review.

    DATA SOURCES:

    PubMed, ScienceDirect, PsycINFO, and Cumulative Index to Nursing & Allied Health.

    REVIEW METHODS:

    studies included were: (1) published in English between January 1995 to September 2015; (2) primary researches; and (3) focused on fathers providing skin-to-skin contact with their infants and its impact on infant and paternal outcomes. The Joanna Briggs Institute's Critical Appraisal Checklists were used to appraise the scientific rigour of the studies.

    FINDINGS:

    twelve studies (10 quantitative and two qualitative) were included in this review. Father-infant skin-to-skin contact had positive impacts on infants' outcomes, including temperature and pain, bio-physiological markers, behavioural response, as well as paternal outcomes, which include parental role attainment, paternal interaction behaviour, and paternal stress and anxiety.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    a father's involvement in providing skin-to-skin contact seems to be feasible and beneficial to both infants and fathers. However, there has been a scarcity of literature that exclusively examines fathers' involvement and perceptions related to skin-to-skin contact in the postpartum period. Future research should examine skin-to-skin contact by fathers and its associated benefits, as well as fathers' perceptions on father-infant SSC among varied populations.

    IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE:

    a father's involvement in providing skin-to-skin contact should be promoted during the postnatal period. Father-infant skin-to-skin contact is a valuable alternative, especially during the unavailability of mothers due to special circumstances, including medical emergencies and caesarean section.

  • 19.
    Skagerström, Janna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Anne Lie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Holmqvist, Marika
    Swedish National Board Health and Welfare, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Envall, Eva-Karin
    Swedish National Institute of Public Health, Östersund, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    Towards improved alcohol prevention in Swedish antenatal care?2012In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 314-320Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: to evaluate an education effort and revised alcohol-preventive routine in Swedish antenatal care; to generate more knowledge for further development of alcohol issues in antenatal care. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanDesign: two national cross-sectional surveys of Swedish midwives were conducted. Baseline data were collected in 2006 and follow-up data in 2009. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSetting: antenatal care centres in Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanParticipants: 974 midwives in 2006 and 1108 midwives in 2009. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMeasurement: amount and content of continuing professional education, work with alcohol-related issues, identification of women with risky consumption of alcohol, and action after identifying women with risky consumption. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanFindings: the amount of continuing professional education undertaken by midwives on handling risky drinking increased significantly between 2006 and 2009. The routine to detect risky drinking changed between the baseline and follow-up data collection, as nearly all midwives reported the use of an alcohol screening questionnaire in 2009. The most confident midwives in 2009 had taken part in more days of education, more often stated it was their own initiative to participate, and had more often taken part in education regarding MI, provision of advice and information on the health risks associated with alcohol and, screening. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanKey conclusions: our results indicate that a broad, national education effort can be successful in enhancing knowledge and changing antenatal care practice. However, generalisation to other countries or cultures may be limited because the usage of new routines is affected by many organisational and contextual factors.

  • 20.
    Sluijs, Anne-Marie
    et al.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Cleiren, Marc P. H. D.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Scherjon, Sicco A.
    University of Medical Centre Groningen, Netherlands.
    Wijma, Klaas
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Does fear of childbirth or family history affect whether pregnant Dutch women prefer a home- or hospital birth?2015In: Midwifery, ISSN 0266-6138, E-ISSN 1532-3099, Vol. 31, no 12, p. 1143-1148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: it is a generally accepted idea that women who give birth at home are less fearful of giving birth than women who give birth in a hospital. We explored fear of childbirth (FOC) in relation to preferred and actual place of birth. Since the Netherlands has a long history of home birthing, we also examined how the place where a pregnant womans mother or sisters gave birth related to the preferred place of birth. Design: a prospective cohort study. Setting: five midwifery practises in the region Leiden/Haarlem, the Netherlands. Participants: 104 low risk nulliparous and parous women. Method: questionnaires were completed in gestation week 30 (T1) and six weeks post partum (T2). Measurements and findings: no significant differences were found in antepartum FOC between those who preferred a home or a hospital birth. Women with a strong preference for either home or hospital had lower FOC (mean W-DEQ = 60.3) than those with a weak preference (mean W-DEQ= 71.0), t (102)= 2.60, p= 0.01. The place of birth of close family members predicted a higher chance (OR 3.8) of the same place being preferred by the pregnant woman. Pre- to postpartum FOC increased in women preferring home- but having hospital birth. Key conclusions: the idea that FOC is related to the choice of place of birth was not true for this low risk cohort. Women in both preference groups (home and hospital) made their decisions based on negative and positive motivations. Mentally adjusting to a different environment than that preferred, apart from the medical complications, can cause more FOC post partum. Implications for practice: the decreasing number of home births in the Netherlands will probably be a self-reinforcing effect, so in future, pregnant women will be less likely to feel supported by their family or society to give birth at home. Special attention should be given to the psychological condition of women who were referred to a place of birth and caregiver they did not prefer, by means of evaluation of the delivery and being alert to anxiety or other stress symptoms after childbirth. These women have higher chance of fear post partum which is related to a higher risk of psychiatric problems. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

1 - 20 of 20
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf