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  • 1.
    Abidi, Latifa
    et al.
    Maastricht Univ, Netherlands.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Forskningsstrategiska enheten.
    ODonnell, Amy
    Newcastle Univ, England.
    Conversations about alcohol in healthcare: cross-sectional surveys in the Netherlands and Sweden2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol. 20, no 1Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    This study evaluated and compared the extent, duration, contents, experiences and effects of alcohol conversations in healthcare in the Netherlands and Sweden in 2017.

    Methods

    Survey data in the Netherlands and Sweden were collected through an online web panel. Subjects were 2996 participants (response rate: 50.8%) in Sweden and 2173 (response rate: 82.2%) in the Netherlands. Data was collected on socio-demographics, alcohol consumption, healthcare visits in the past 12 months, number of alcohol conversations, and characteristics of alcohol conversations (duration, contents, experience, effects).

    Results

    Results showed that Swedish respondents were more likely to have had alcohol conversations (OR = 1.99; 95%CI = 1.64–2.41; p = < 0.001) compared to Dutch respondents. In Sweden, alcohol conversations were more often perceived as routine (p = < 0.001), were longer (p = < 0.001), and more often contained verbal information about alcohol’s health effects (p = 0.007) or written information (p = 0.001) than in the Netherlands. In Sweden, 40+ year-olds were less likely to report a positive effect compared to the youngest respondents. In the Netherlands, men, sick-listed respondents, and risky drinkers, and in Sweden those that reported “other” occupational status such as parental leave, were more likely to have had alcohol conversations.

    Conclusions

    The results suggest that alcohol conversations are more common in healthcare practice in Sweden than in the Netherlands. However, positive effects of alcohol conversations were less likely to be reported among older respondents in Sweden. Our results indicate that alcohol preventative work should be improved in both countries, with more focus on risky drinkers and the content of the conversations in Sweden, and expanding alcohol screening in the Netherlands.

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  • 2.
    Agnafors, Sara
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Children's and Women's Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden.
    Torgerson, Jarl
    Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Rusner, Marie
    Sodra Alvsborgs Hosp, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kjellstrom, Anna Norman
    Head Off, Sweden.
    Injuries in children and adolescents with psychiatric disorders2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 1273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Unintentional injuries are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in children of all ages. Prevention strategies require knowledge of risk factors, and behavior and psychiatric disorders have been suggested to influence the risk of injury during childhood. While externalizing disorders have been found to increase the risk for injuries, results are mixed regarding internalizing disorders, such as affective and anxiety conditions, and Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD). There is a need for large scale studies relying on robust data sources. The aim of the present study was to examine the association between psychiatric disorders and injuries requiring medical attention, in a large population-based cohort of 350,000 children and adolescents in Sweden. Methods Data were obtained from the regional health care database Vega. Psychiatric diagnoses and injury diagnoses obtained during 2014-2018 for individuals aged 0-17 years in 2016 were extracted. Descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in 5-year injury prevalence between children with and without different psychiatric diagnoses. Logistic regression was used in age-stratified models to test the association between psychiatric diagnoses and injuries requiring medical attention. Results The results show an increased risk for concurrent injuries in general, but the patterns vary by age and psychiatric disorder. Externalizing disorders and anxiety conditions were associated with concurrent injuries, while individuals with ASD had a lower risk for most injuries included. Affective disorders were associated with an increased risk for wounds, concussion, complications and poisoning, while the risk for fractures was decreased. Self-inflicted injury was more common in all psychiatric conditions investigated during adolescence, except for ASD. Children and adolescents with many types of psychiatric disorders were also at increased risk for a concurrent maltreatment diagnosis. Conclusions A general pattern of increased risk for concurrent injuries in children and adolescents with most psychiatric diagnoses was found, but the associations vary by age and type of psychiatric disorder. The results add to the literature on risk factors for injuries in children and adolescents, supporting diagnosis specific patterns. Several psychiatric diagnoses were associated with a marked increase in injury risk, indicating a high burden of disease for affected individuals.

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  • 3.
    Andersen, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Dept Res & Dev, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Dept Res & Dev, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Arestedt, Kristofer
    Linnaeus Univ, Sweden; Res Sect, Sweden.
    Lendahls, Lena
    Dept Res & Dev, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with increased physical activity among patients prescribed physical activity in Swedish routine health care including an offer of counselor support: a 1-year follow-up2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 509Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The study addresses knowledge gaps in research regarding influences of routine health care delivery of physical activity on prescription (PAP). The aim was to investigate if patient and health care characteristics are associated with increased physical activity 1 year after prescription among patients offered counselor support in addition to health care professionals prescription. The study was conducted in primary and secondary care in a Swedish health care region. Methods All PAP recipients during 1 year were invited (N = 1503) to participate in this observational prospective study. Data were collected from medical records and questionnaires (baseline and follow-up). Descriptive statistics and multiple logistic regression analysis were used. The outcome variable was increased physical activity after 1 year. Study variables were patient and health care characteristics. Results Three hundred and fifty-five patients with complete follow-up data were included. The mean age was 62 years (SD = 14; range, 18-90) and 68% were females. Almost half (47%) had increased physical activity 1 year after PAP. Multiple logistic regression analysis showed that increased physical activity at follow-up was positively associated with lower baseline activity, counselor use, and positive perception of support. Counselor users with low baseline activity had higher odds ratio for increased physical activity at follow-up than non-users (OR = 7.2, 95% CI = 2.2-23.5 vs. OR = 3.2, 95% CI = 1.4-7.5). Positive perception of support was associated with increased physical activity among counselor users but not among non-users. Conclusions An increase in physical activity after PAP was related to low baseline activity, positive perception of support, and use of counselor support after PAP. Qualified counseling support linked to PAP seems to be important for achieving increased physical activity among patients with lower baseline activity.

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  • 4.
    Andersen, Pia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Reg Kronoberg, Sweden.
    Lendahls, Lena
    Reg Kronoberg, Sweden; Linnaeus Univ, Sweden.
    Holmberg, Sara
    Reg Kronoberg, Sweden; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Patients experiences of physical activity on prescription with access to counsellors in routine care: a qualitative study in Sweden2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 210Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPhysical activity on prescription (PAP) has been implemented in several countries, including Sweden, to support patients who might benefit from increased physical activity. This study explores the experiences of recipients of PAP in routine health care in Sweden that offers the recipients support from physical activity counsellors. The aim was to explore influences on engagement in physical activity by PAP recipients from a long-term perspective.MethodsWe conducted individual semi-structured interviews using a topic guide with a purposively selected sample of 13 adult PAP recipients 1.5 to 2.5years after PAP. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed through inductive and deductive content analysis. The questions were informed by Capability-Opportunity-Motivation-Behaviour (COM-B), which was also used as a framework to analyse the data by means of categorizing the factors (influences on the behaviour).ResultsTen factors (i.e. sub-categories) that influenced the participants engagement in physical activity were identified. PAP recipients capability to engage in physical activity was associated with adapting the PAP to the individuals physical capacity and taking into account the individuals previous experiences of physical activity. PAP recipients opportunity to engage in physical activity was related to receiving a prescription, receiving professional counselling and follow-up from a physical activity counsellor, collaboration between prescriber and counsellor, having access to appropriate activities, having a balanced life situation and having support from someone who encouraged continued physical activity. PAP recipients motivation to engage in physical activity was associated with the desire to improve his or her health condition and finding activities that encouraged continuation.ConclusionsPAP recipients engagement in physical activity was influenced by their capability, opportunity and motivation to undertake this behaviour. Numerous extraneous factors influence capability and motivation. Physical activity counsellors were found to be important for sustained activity because they use an individual approach to counselling and flexible follow-up adapted to each individuals need of support.

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  • 5.
    Andersen, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anderzen, Ingrid
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kristiansson, Per
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Larsson, Kjerstin
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Positive experiences of a vocational rehabilitation intervention for individuals on long-term sick leave, the Dirigo project: a qualitative study2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 790Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The process of returning to work after long-term sick leave can sometimes be complex. Many factors, (e.g. cooperation between different authorities and the individual as well as individual factors such as health, emotional well-being and self-efficacy) may have an impact on an individuals ability to work. The aim of this study was to investigate clients experiences with an individually tailored vocational rehabilitation, the Dirigo project, and encounters with professionals working on it. The Dirigo project was based on collaboration between rehabilitation authorities, individually tailored interventions and a motivational interviewing approach. Methods: A descriptive qualitative design was used with data collected through interviews. Fourteen individuals on long-term sick leave took part in individual semi-structured interviews. The interviews were analysed using content analysis. Results: The analysis showed overall positive experience of methods and encounters with professionals in a vocational rehabilitation project. The positive experiences were based on four key factors: 1. Opportunities for receiving various dimensions of support. 2. Good overall treatment by the professionals. 3. Satisfaction with the working methods of the project, and 4. Opportunities for personal development. Conclusions: The main result showed that the clients had an overall positive experience of a vocational rehabilitation project and encounters with professionals who used motivational interviewing as a communication method. The overall positive experience indicated that their interactions with the different professionals may have affected their self-efficacy in general and in relation to transition to work. The knowledge is essential for the professionals working in the area of vocational rehabilitation. However, vocational rehabilitation interventions also need a societal approach to be able to offer clients opportunities for job training and real jobs.

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  • 6.
    Andersson, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ölvander, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Alcohol use among university students in Sweden measured by an electronic screening instrument2009In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Electronic-based alcohol screening and brief interventions for university students with problem drinking behaviours forms an important means by which to identify risky drinkers. Methods: In this study an e-SBI project was implemented to assess drinking patterns, and to provide personalised feedback about alcohol consumption and related health problems, to students in a Swedish university. In this study, third semester university students (n = 2858) from all faculties (colleges) at the University were invited to participate in e-SBI screenings. This study employed a randomised controlled trial, with respondents having a equal chance of being assigned to a limited, or full-feedback response. Results: The study shows that high risk drinkers tend to underestimate their own consumption compared to others, and that these high risk drinkers experience more negative consequences after alcohol intake, than other respondents. There was a strong belief, for both high-and low-risk drinkers, that alcohol helped celebrations be more festive. This study also confirms findings from other study locations that while males drank more than females in our study population; females reached the same peak alcohol blood concentrations as males. Conclusion: Obtaining clear and current information on drinking patterns demonstrated by university students can help public health officials, university administration, and local health care providers develop appropriate prevention and treatment strategies.

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  • 7.
    Andersson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Co-morbidity and health care utilisation five years prior to diagnosis for depression: A register-based study in a Swedish population2011In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, p. 552-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Depressive disorders have been associated with a number of co-morbidities, and we   hypothesized that patients with a depression diagnosis would be heavy users of health   care services, not only when first evaluated for depression, but also for preceding   years. The aim of this study was to investigate whether increased health care utilisation   and co-morbidity could be seen during five years prior to an initial diagnosis of   depression.

    Methods

    We used a longitudinal register-based study design. The setting comprised the general   population in the county of Östergötland, south-east Sweden. All 2470 patients who   were 20 years or older in 2006 and who received a new diagnosis of depression (F32   according to ICD-10) in 2006, were selected and followed back to the year 2001, five   years before their depression diagnosis. A control group was randomly selected among   those who were aged 20 years or over in 2006 and who had received no depression diagnosis   during the period 2001-2006.

    Results

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status.

    Patients who received a diagnosis of depression used twice the amount of health care   (e.g. physician visits and hospital days) during the five year period prior to diagnosis   compared to the control group. A particularly strong increase in health care utilisation   was seen the last year before diagnosis. These findings were supported with a high   level of co-morbidity as for example musculoskeletal disorders during the whole five-year   period for patients with a depression diagnosis.

    Conclusions

    Predictors of a depression diagnosis were a high number of physician visits, female   gender, age below 60, age above 80 and a low socioeconomic status. To find early signs   of depression in the clinical setting and to use a preventive strategy to handle these   patients is important.

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  • 8.
    Andersson, Erik
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    Karolinska Institute.
    Smit, Filip
    Vrije University Amsterdam Med Centre.
    Paxling, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska Institute.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska Institute.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska Institute.
    Cost-effectiveness of internet-based cognitive behavior therapy for irritable bowel syndrome: results from a randomized controlled trial2011In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, no 215Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Irritable Bowel Syndrome (IBS) is highly prevalent and is associated with a substantial economic burden. Cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) has been shown to be effective in treating IBS. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of a new treatment alternative, internet-delivered CBT based on exposure and mindfulness exercises. Methods: Participants (N = 85) with IBS were recruited through self-referral and were assessed via a telephone interview and self-report measures on the internet. Participants were randomized to internet-delivered CBT or to a discussion forum. Economic data was assessed at pre-, post- and at 3-month and 1 year follow-up. Results: Significant cost reductions were found for the treatment group at $16,806 per successfully treated case. The cost reductions were mainly driven by reduced work loss in the treatment group. Results were sustained at 3-month and 1 year follow-up. Conclusions: Internet-delivered CBT appears to generate health gains in IBS treatment and is associated with cost-savings from a societal perspective.

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  • 9.
    Anik, Asibul Islam
    et al.
    Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Med Univ BSMMU, Bangladesh; SAJIDA Fdn, Bangladesh.
    Chowdhury, Mohammad Rocky Khan
    First Capital Univ Bangladesh, Bangladesh.
    Khan, Hafiz T. A.
    Univ West London, England.
    Mondal, Md Nazrul Islam
    Univ Rajshahi, Bangladesh.
    Perera, Nirmala
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Oxford, England.
    Kader, Manzur
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Urban-rural differences in the associated factors of severe under-5 child undernutrition based on the composite index of severe anthropometric failure (CISAF) in Bangladesh2021In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 2147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction Severe undernutrition among under-5 children is usually assessed using single or conventional indicators (i.e., severe stunting, severe wasting, and/or severe underweight). But these conventional indicators partly overlap, thus not providing a comprehensive estimate of the proportion of malnourished children in the population. Incorporating all these conventional nutritional indicators, the Composite Index of Severe Anthropometric Failure (CSIAF) provides six different undernutrition measurements and estimates the overall burden of severe undernutrition with a more comprehensive view. This study applied the CISAF indicators to investigate the prevalence of severe under-5 child undernutrition in Bangladesh and its associated socioeconomic factors in the rural-urban context. Methods This study extracted the children dataset from the 2017-18 Bangladesh Demographic Health Survey (BDHS), and the data of 7661 children aged under-5 were used for further analyses. CISAF was used to define severe undernutrition by aggregating conventional nutritional indicators. Bivariate analysis was applied to examine the proportional differences of variables between non-severe undernutrition and severe undernutrition group. The potential associated socioeconomic factors for severe undernutrition were identified using the adjusted model of logistic regression analysis. Results The overall prevalence of severe undernutrition measured by CISAF among the children under-5 was 11.0% in Bangladesh (rural 11.5% vs urban 9.6%). The significant associated socioeconomic factors of severe undernutrition in rural areas were children born with small birth weight (AOR: 2.84), children from poorest households (AOR: 2.44), and children aged &lt; 36 months, and children of uneducated mothers (AOR: 2.15). Similarly, in urban areas, factors like- children with small birth weight (AOR: 3.99), children of uneducated parents (AOR: 2.34), poorest households (APR: 2.40), underweight mothers (AOR: 1.58), mothers without postnatal care (AOR: 2.13), and childrens birth order &gt;= 4 (AOR: 1.75), showed positive and significant association with severe under-5 undernutrition. Conclusion Severe undernutrition among the under-5 children dominates in Bangladesh, especially in rural areas and the poorest urban families. More research should be conducted using such composite indices (like- CISAF) to depict the comprehensive scenario of severe undernutrition among the under-5 children and to address multi-sectoral intervening programs for eradicating severe child undernutrition.

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  • 10.
    Aronsson, Gunnar
    et al.
    University of Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theorell, Tores
    University of Stockholm, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Grape, Tom
    Health Care Centre, Sweden.
    Hammarstrom, Anne
    University of Umeå, Sweden.
    Högstedt, Christer
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Marteinsdottir, Ina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Psychiatry.
    Skoog, Ingmar
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Traskman-Bendz, Lil
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hall, Charlotte
    Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden.
    A systematic review including meta-analysis of work environment and burnout symptoms2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 264Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Practitioners and decision makers in the medical and insurance systems need knowledge on the relationship between work exposures and burnout. Many burnout studies -original as well as reviews-restricted their analyses to emotional exhaustion or did not report results on cynicism, personal accomplishment or global burnout. To meet this need we carried out this review and meta-analyses with the aim to provide systematically graded evidence for associations between working conditions and near-future development of burnout symptoms. Methods: A wide range of work exposure factors was screened. Inclusion criteria were: 1) Study performed in Europe, North America, Australia and New Zealand 1990-2013. 2) Prospective or comparable case control design. 3) Assessments of exposure (work) and outcome at baseline and at least once again during follow up 1-5 years later. Twenty-five articles met the predefined relevance and quality criteria. The GRADE-system with its 4-grade evidence scale was used. Results: Most of the 25 studies focused emotional exhaustion, fewer cynicism and still fewer personal accomplishment. Moderately strong evidence (grade 3) was concluded for the association between job control and reduced emotional exhaustion and between low workplace support and increased emotional exhaustion. Limited evidence (grade 2) was found for the associations between workplace justice, demands, high work load, low reward, low supervisor support, low co-worker support, job insecurity and change in emotional exhaustion. Cynicism was associated with most of these work factors. Reduced personal accomplishment was only associated with low reward. There were few prospective studies with sufficient quality on adverse chemical, biological and physical factors and burnout. Conclusion: While high levels of job support and workplace justice were protective for emotional exhaustion, high demands, low job control, high work load, low reward and job insecurity increased the risk for developing exhaustion. Our approach with a wide range of work exposure factors analysed in relation to the separate dimensions of burnout expanded the knowledge of associations, evidence as well as research needs. The potential of organizational interventions is illustrated by the findings that burnout symptoms are strongly influenced by structural factors such as job demands, support and the possibility to exert control.

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  • 11.
    Bergström, Malin
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Fransson, Emma
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Rajmil, Luis
    Catalan Agency Health Informat Assessment and Qual, Spain.
    Berlin, Marie
    National Board Health and Welf, Sweden.
    Gustafsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry in Linköping.
    Hjern, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden.
    Living in two homes-a Swedish national survey of wellbeing in 12 and 15 year olds with joint physical custody2013In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The practice of joint physical custody, where children spend equal time in each parent’s home after they separate, is increasing in many countries. It is particularly common in Sweden, where this custody arrangement applies to 30 per cent of children with separated parents. The aim of this study was to examine children’s health-related quality of life after parental separation, by comparing children living with both parents in nuclear families to those living in joint physical custody and other forms of domestic arrangements.

    Methods

    Data from a national Swedish classroom study of 164,580 children aged 12 and 15-years-old were analysed by two-level linear regression modelling. Z-scores were used to equalise scales for ten dimensions of wellbeing from the KIDSCREEN-52 and the KIDSCREEN-10 Index and analysed for children in joint physical custody in comparison with children living in nuclear families and mostly or only with one parent.

    Results

    Living in a nuclear family was positively associated with almost all aspects of wellbeing in comparison to children with separated parents. Children in joint physical custody experienced more positive outcomes, in terms of subjective wellbeing, family life and peer relations, than children living mostly or only with one parent. For the 12-year-olds, beta coefficients for moods and emotions ranged from −0.20 to −0.33 and peer relations from −0.11 to −0.20 for children in joint physical custody and living mostly or only with one parent. The corresponding estimates for the 15-year-olds varied from −0.08 to −0.28 and from −0.03 to −0.13 on these subscales. The 15-year-olds in joint physical custody were more likely than the 12-year-olds to report similar wellbeing levels on most outcomes to the children in nuclear families.

    Conclusions

    Children who spent equal time living with both parents after a separation reported better wellbeing than children in predominantly single parent care. This was particularly true for the 15-year-olds, while the reported wellbeing of 12-years-olds was less satisfactory. There is a need for further studies that can account for the pre and post separation context of individual families and the wellbeing of younger age groups in joint physical custody.

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  • 12.
    Björk Brämberg, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Narhalsan, Sweden.
    Holmgren, Kristina
    Narhalsan, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Bultmann, Ute
    Univ Med Ctr Groningen, Netherlands.
    Gyllensten, Hanna
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Jan
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergstrom, Gunnar
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Univ Gavle, Sweden.
    Increasing return-to-work among people on sick leave due to common mental disorders: design of a cluster-randomized controlled trial of a problem-solving intervention versus care-as-usual conducted in the Swedish primary health care system (PROSA)2018In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 18, article id 889Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Common mental disorders affect about one-third of the European working-age population and are one of the leading causes of sick leave in Sweden and other OECD countries. Besides the individual suffering, the costs for society are high. This paper describes the design of a study to evaluate a work-related, problem-solving intervention provided at primary health care centers for employees on sick leave due to common mental disorders. Methods: The study has a two-armed cluster randomized design in which the participating rehabilitation coordinators are randomized into delivering the intervention or providing care-as-usual. Employees on sick leave due to common mental disorders will be recruited by an independent research assistant. The intervention aims to improve the employees return-to-work process by identifying problems perceived as hindering return-to-work and finding solutions. The rehabilitation coordinator facilitates a participatory approach, in which the employee and the employer together identify obstacles and solutions in relation to the work situation. The primary outcome is total number of sick leave days during the 18-month follow-up after inclusion. A long-term follow-up at 36 months is planned. Secondary outcomes are short-term sick leave (min. 2 weeks and max. 12 weeks), psychological symptoms, work ability, presenteeism and health related quality of life assessed at baseline, 6 and 12-month follow-up. Intervention fidelity, reach, dose delivered and dose received will be examined in a process evaluation. An economic evaluation will put health-related quality of life and sick leave in relation to costs from the perspectives of society and health care services. A parallel ethical evaluation will focus on the interventions consequences for patient autonomy, privacy, equality, fairness and professional ethos and integrity. Discussion: The study is a pragmatic trial which will include analyses of the interventions effectiveness, and a process evaluation in primary health care settings. Methodological strengths and challenges are discussed, such as the risk of selection bias, contamination and detection bias. If the intervention shows promising results for return-to-work, the prospects are good for implementing the intervention in routine primary health care.

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  • 13.
    Blom, Helena
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden .
    Hogberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Sweden Vasternorrland County Council, Sweden .
    Strong association between earlier abuse and revictimization in youth2014In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 715Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Violence victimization among youth is recognized as a public health problem. The objective was to analyze the risk pattern of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse during the past 12 months by gender, sociodemographic factors, health risk behaviors, and exposure to abuse before the age of 15, among young men and women attending youth health centers in Sweden. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was conducted using a nationally representative sample of youth health centers. A total of 2,250 young women and 920 young men aged 15-23 completed a self-administered questionnaire. Odds ratios (OR) and adjusted odds ratios (AOR) with 95% CI were calculated. Results: A consistent and strong association was noted between exposure to all types of violence during the past year and victimization before the age of 15 for all types of violence for both women and men. The only exceptions were childhood sexual victimization and sexual violence during the past year for men. Younger age was associated with all violence exposure for the women and with emotional violence for the men. For the women, drug use was associated with all types of violence, while the association with hazardous alcohol use and not living with parents was restricted to physical and sexual violence exposure, present smoking was restricted to emotional and physical violence exposure, and partnership and living in urban areas were restricted to sexual violence. For men, not being partnered, hazardous alcohol consumption, and drug use meant increased risk for physical violence, while smoking and living in urban areas were associated with sexual violence. After adjustment, immigration had no association with violence exposure. Conclusions: Violence victimization in young men and women is often not a single experience. Findings underline the importance of early interventions among previously abused youth.

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  • 14.
    Bolic Baric, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Yngve, Moa
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Holmefur, Marie
    Orebro Univ, Sweden.
    Feldman, Inna
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Wilder, Jenny
    Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Johansen, Kine
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Klang, Nina
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Malardalen Univ, Sweden.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Borgestig, Maria
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Partnering for change (P4C) in Sweden- a study protocol of a collaborative school-based service delivery model to create inclusive learning environments2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 2219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundInclusive learning environments are considered as crucial for childrens engagement with learning and participation in school. Partnering for change (P4C) is a collaborative school-based service delivery model where services are provided at three levels of intensity based on childrens needs (class, group-, individual interventions). Interventions in P4C are provided universally to support all children with learning, not only children with special education needs (SEN), and as such are expected to be health-promoting.AimThe aim of the study is to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of P4C as well as school staff members and childrens experiences after P4C.MethodsIn a parallel, non-randomised controlled intervention design, 400 children, aged 6-12 years, and their teachers, will be recruited to either intervention classes, working according to the P4C, or to control classes (allocation ratio 1:1). Data will be collected at baseline, post-intervention (4 months), and 11 months follow-up post baseline. The primary outcome is childrens engagement with learning in school. Secondary outcomes include for example childrens health-related quality of life and wellbeing, occupational performance in school, attendance, and special educational needs. The difference-in-differences method using regression modelling will be applied to evaluate any potential changes following P4C. Focus group interviews focusing on children, and professionals experiences will be performed after P4C. A health economic evaluation of P4C will be performed, both in the short term (post intervention) and the long term (11-month follow-up). This study will provide knowledge about the effectiveness of P4C on childrens engagement with learning, mental health, and wellbeing, when creating inclusive learning environments using a combination of class-, group- and individual-level interventions.Trial registration numberNCT05435937.

  • 15.
    Bonn, Stephanie E.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ostenson, Claes-Goeran
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lagerros, Ylva Trolle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp Huddinge, Sweden.
    App-technology to improve lifestyle behaviors among working adults - the Health Integrator study, a randomized controlled trial2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 273Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundMobile health, mHealth is recognized as a strategy to improve lifestyle behaviors. Research targeting specific lifestyle behaviors has shown that interventions using smartphones can be effective. However, few studies have evaluated solutions with multicomponent interventions, tailoring the intervention to the specific needs of the participant using a combination of mHealth and conventional treatment. To accomplish this, we developed Health Integrator, an mHealth platform with services and offers in the areas of diet, physical activity, sleeping habits, stress, alcohol and tobacco use. In the system, the user selects an area of intervention together with a health coach and set weekly goals. This study protocol presents the design and methodology of the Health Integrator Study, a randomized controlled trial to promote improved lifestyle behaviors.MethodsA three-arm parallel randomized controlled trial (1:1:1) is conducted in the Stockholm County, Sweden. In total, 209 employees at a four different companies representing both white and blue collar workers, have been recruited.Participants are randomized to either a control group or to one of two intervention groups receiving a 3-month lifestyle behavior change program including either 1) use of Health Integrator and monthly health coaching sessions or 2) only Health Integrator.At baseline and follow-up after 3- and 6-months, all participants answer questionnaires assessing lifestyle behaviors and quality of life. At baseline and the 3-month follow-up (end of intervention period), weight, height, waist circumference and blood pressure are measured, and all participants wear an Actigraph accelerometer for 7days to assess physical activity. Blood lipid profile and HbA1c are measured among all participants at baseline. If baseline measures fall outside the normal range, a second measurement is done after 3months.DiscussionThe Health Integrator Intervention Study will evaluate if a personalized intervention combining mHealth and conventional programs for lifestyle change, with or without additional health coach sessions, can improve lifestyle behaviors and quality of life. Based on the results from this trial, Health Integrator can easily be implemented within a broad public.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT03579342. Retrospectively registered, first submitted May 8, 2018.

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  • 16.
    Claesson, Ing-Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Josefsson, Ann
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Sydsjö, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Prevalence of anxiety and depressive symptoms among obese pregnant and postpartum women: an intervention study.2010In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, p. 766-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Although studies have shown an association between anxiety and depression and obesity, psychological health among obese women during and after pregnancy has not been carefully studied. The aim of this study was to investigate psychological well-being using symptoms of depression and/or anxiety among obese pregnant women attending a weight gain restriction program and to then compare this group with a control group receiving traditional antenatal care.

    METHODS: 151 obese pregnant women in an intervention group and 188 obese pregnant women in a control group answered the Beck Anxiety Inventory (BAI) and the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS). Group differences between the two groups were estimated by using the χ2 - test on categorical variables. The Student's t-test on continuous, normally distributed variables measuring changes in mean score on BAI and EPDS over time was used. To make a more comprehensive assessment of group differences, between as well as within the two groups, logistic regressions were performed with the BAI and EPDS as dependent variables, measured at gestational weeks 15 and 35 and 11 weeks postnatal. The grouping variable has been adjusted for socio-demographic variables and complications.

    RESULTS: The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety during pregnancy varied between 24% and 25% in the intervention group and 22% and 23% in the control group. The prevalence of symptoms of anxiety postnatally was 9% in the intervention group and 11% in the control group. Five percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% of the women in the control group showed symptoms of anxiety during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. The prevalence of symptoms of depression during pregnancy varied between 19% and 22% in the intervention group but was constant at 18% in the control group. Postnatal prevalence was 11% in both groups. Six percent of the women in the intervention group and 4% in the control group showed symptoms of depression during the course of pregnancy and at the postpartum assessment. We found no differences between the two groups as concerns demographic characteristics, weight gain in kg, or the distribution of scores on anxiety and depressive symptoms nor did we find differences in the fluctuation of anxiety and depressive symptoms over time between the women in the intervention group and in the control group.

    CONCLUSION: Obese pregnant women attending an intervention program seem to have the same risk of experiencing anxiety and/or depressive symptoms as do obese pregnant and postnatal women in general.

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  • 17.
    Dahlqvist, I
    et al.
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Severin, J.
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Akerstrom, Magnus
    Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden; Univ Gothenburg, Sweden; Reg Vastra Gotaland, Sweden.
    Shifting from an individual to an organizational perspective in work environment management - a process evaluation of a six-year intervention program within the Swedish public sector2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1108Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundWorking systematically with the work environment, particularly the organizational and psychosocial work environment entails several challenges for employers. There is a lack of knowledge on how to best undertake this work. Thus, the aim of this study is to evaluate the process of a six-year organizational-level intervention program where workplaces could apply for additional funds to implement preventive intervention measures, with the intention of improving working conditions and reducing sickness absence within the Swedish public sector.MethodsThe program management process was studied using a mixed-method approach combining qualitative document and content analyses based on process documentation produced between 2017 and 2022 (n = 135), interviews with internal occupational health services professionals in 2021 (n = 9) and quantitative descriptive analyses of submitted applications with decisions from 2017 to 2022 (n = 621).ResultsQualitative analyses of the process documentation revealed concerns from the project group regarding access to sufficient competence and resources among stakeholders and participating workplaces, and role conflicts and ambiguities between the program and everyday operations. To address these challenges, the application process was developed over time using the knowledge gained from previous years. A change in the mental models in work environment management, from an individual to an organizational perspective, was seen among the project group and the internal occupational health services responsible for implementing most of the granted intervention measures. In addition, the proportion of granted intervention measures on an organizational level increased throughout the years from 39% in 2017 to 89% in 2022. The changes in the application process were believed to be the main contributor to the change among the applying workplaces.ConclusionsResults indicate that a long-term organizational-level workplace intervention program may be used, by the employer, as a tool for shifting from an individual- to an organizational perspective in the work environment management. However, additional measures on multiple levels need to be implemented to secure a sustainable shift in perspective within the organization.

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  • 18.
    Dannetun, E.
    et al.
    Department of Communicable Disease Control, Landstinget I Östergötland, SE-581 91 Linköping, Sweden, Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Tegnell, A.
    Communicable Disease Unit, National Board of Health and Welfare, SE-106 30 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Giesecke, J.
    Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Karolinska Institute, SE-171 77 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Parents' attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccination for their children. a survey comparing paper and web questionnaires, Sweden 20052007In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. The World Health Organisation, WHO, recommends that most countries should vaccinate all children against hepatitis B. Sweden has chosen not to do so, but the issue is reassessed regularly. The objective of this survey was to assess knowledge and attitudes towards hepatitis B vaccine for children among parents living in Sweden, and to compare distribution of responses and response rate between parents answering a postal questionnaire and those responding via the Internet. Methods. A population-based cross-sectional survey, where the sampling frame consisted of all parents to a child born 2002 living in Sweden. Two independent samples of 1001 parents in each sample were drawn. All parents were contacted by postal mail. The parents in the first sample were invited to participate by answering a paper questionnaire. The parents in the second sample were given an individual user name along with a password, and asked to log on to the Internet to answer an identical electronic questionnaire. Results. A total of 1229 questionnaires were analysed. The overall response rate for paper questionnaires was 55%, and 15% for the web version. Knowledge of the disease hepatitis B was overall high (90%). A higher degree of knowledge was seen among parents with education beyond high school (p = 0.001). This group of parents also had a higher tendency to reply via the Internet (p = 0.001). The willingness to accept hepatitis B vaccine for their child was correlated to the acceptance of the present childhood vaccination programme (p = 0.001). Conclusion. The results reveal a high level of knowledge of the disease and a positive attitude to having their children vaccinated. This study also displays that the conventional postal method of surveying still delivers a higher response rate than a web-based survey. © 2007 Dannetun et al, licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  • 19.
    Delisle, Christine
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sandin, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Forsum, Elisabet
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Trolle-Lagerros, Ylva
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Larsson, Christel
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Maddison, Ralph
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Ruiz, Jonatan R.
    University of Granada, Spain.
    Silfvernagel, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    A web- and mobile phone-based intervention to prevent obesity in 4-year-olds (MINISTOP): a population-based randomized controlled trial2015In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, no 95Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Childhood obesity is an increasing health problem globally. Overweight and obesity may be established as early as 2-5 years of age, highlighting the need for evidence-based effective prevention and treatment programs early in life. In adults, mobile phone based interventions for weight management (mHealth) have demonstrated positive effects on body mass, however, their use in child populations has yet to be examined. The aim of this paper is to report the study design and methodology of the MINSTOP (Mobile-based Intervention Intended to Stop Obesity in Preschoolers) trial. Methods/Design: A two-arm, parallel design randomized controlled trial in 300 healthy Swedish 4-year-olds is conducted. After baseline measures, parents are allocated to either an intervention-or control group. The 6-month mHealth intervention consists of a web-based application (the MINSTOP app) to help parents promote healthy eating and physical activity in children. MINISTOP is based on the Social Cognitive Theory and involves the delivery of a comprehensive, personalized program of information and text messages based on existing guidelines for a healthy diet and active lifestyle in pre-school children. Parents also register physical activity and intakes of candy, soft drinks, vegetables as well as fruits of their child and receive feedback through the application. Primary outcomes include body fatness and energy intake, while secondary outcomes are time spent in sedentary, moderate, and vigorous physical activity, physical fitness and intakes of fruits and vegetables, snacks, soft drinks and candy. Food and energy intake (Tool for Energy balance in Children, TECH), body fatness (pediatric option for BodPod), physical activity (Actigraph wGT3x-BT) and physical fitness (the PREFIT battery of five fitness tests) are measured at baseline, after the intervention (six months after baseline) and at follow-up (12 months after baseline). Discussion: This novel study will evaluate the effectiveness of a mHealth program for mitigating gain in body fatness among 4-year-old children. If the intervention proves effective it has great potential to be implemented in child-health care to counteract childhood overweight and obesity.

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  • 20.
    Diwan, Vishal
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute.
    Tamhankar, Ashok J
    RD Gardi Medical College.
    Khandal, Rakesh K
    Shriram Institute Ind Research.
    Sen, Shanta
    Shriram Institute Ind Research.
    Aggarwal, Manjeet
    Shriram Institute Ind Research.
    Marothi, Yogyata
    RD Gardi Medical College.
    Iyer, Rama V
    RD Gardi Medical College.
    Sundblad-Tonderski, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Ecology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Stalsby-Lundborg, Cecilia
    Karolinska Institute.
    Antibiotics and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in waters associated with a hospital in Ujjain, India2010In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 414Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Concerns have been raised about the public health implications of the presence of antibiotic residues in the aquatic environment and their effect on the development of bacterial resistance. While there is information on antibiotic residue levels in hospital effluent from some other countries, information on antibiotic residue levels in effluent from Indian hospitals is not available. Also, concurrent studies on antibiotic prescription quantity in a hospital and antibiotic residue levels and resistant bacteria in the effluent of the same hospital are few. Therefore, we quantified antibiotic residues in waters associated with a hospital in India and assessed their association, if any, with quantities of antibiotic prescribed in the hospital and the susceptibility of Escherichia coli found in the hospital effluent. Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in a teaching hospital outside the city of Ujjain in India. Seven antibiotics - amoxicillin, ceftriaxone, amikacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, norfloxacin and levofloxacin - were selected. Prescribed quantities were obtained from hospital records. The samples of the hospital associated water were analysed for the above mentioned antibiotics using well developed and validated liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry technique after selectively isolating the analytes from the matrix using solid phase extraction. Escherichia coli isolates from these waters were tested for antibiotic susceptibility, by standard Kirby Bauer disc diffusion method using Clinical and Laboratory Standard Institute breakpoints. Results: Ciprofloxacin was the highest prescribed antibiotic in the hospital and its residue levels in the hospital wastewater were also the highest. In samples of the municipal water supply and the groundwater, no antibiotics were detected. There was a positive correlation between the quantity of antibiotics prescribed in the hospital and antibiotic residue levels in the hospital wastewater. Wastewater samples collected in the afternoon contained both a higher number and higher levels of antibiotics compared to samples collected in the morning hours. No amikacin was found in the wastewater, but E. coli isolates from all wastewater samples were resistant to amikacin. Although ciprofloxacin was the most prevalent antibiotic detected in the wastewater, E. coli was not resistant to it. Conclusions: Antibiotics are entering the aquatic environment of countries like India through hospital effluent. Indepth studies are needed to establish the correlation, if any, between the quantities of antibiotics prescribed in hospitals and the levels of antibiotic residues found in hospital effluent. Further, the effect of this on the development of bacterial resistance in the environment and its subsequent public health impact need thorough assessment.

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  • 21.
    Dragioti, Elena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Tsamakis, Konstantinos
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Predictive association between immigration status and chronic pain in the general population: results from the SwePain cohort2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 1462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundPrevious studies suggest that immigration may influence the experience of pain.ObjectiveThis population-based study examines whether immigration status is associated with chronic pain (CP), chronic widespread pain (CWSP), and severe CP at a two-year follow-up. We also tested mediation by mood status (i.e., anxiety and depression).Methods15, 563 participants from a representative stratified random sample of 34,000 individuals living in south-eastern Sweden completed a postal survey, during 2013-2015, that included the following data: immigration status; presence of CP (pain lasting at least 3 months) and CWSP (a modified classification of widespread pain for use in epidemiological studies); severity of CP based on a numeric rating scale; and depression, anxiety, economic situation, and sociodemographic information. We applied logistic regressions using the generalized estimating equations (GEE), with Swedish-born as the reference group and path analyses models.ResultsCompared to the Swedish-born participants (n =14,093;90%), the immigrants (n =1470;10%) had an elevated risk of all pain outcomes (CP: odds ratio [OR]=1.18; 95% confidence interval [CI=1.04-1.33, CWSP: OR=1.39; 95% CI: 1.15-1.69 and severe CP: 1.51; 95% CI: 1.23-1.87) after adjustments. Path analyses showed that baseline age, immigrant status, and financial hardship had a significant influence on chronic pain outcomes at follow-up with baseline mood status as the mediator. Immigration status was also associated with age and financial hardship.ConclusionImmigrants may have increased risk of chronic pain, widespread pain, and severe pain and this risk is mediated by mood status. Targeted interventions better tailored to the socio-economic and psychological status of immigrants with chronic pain are warranted.

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  • 22.
    Duong, Duc M
    et al.
    Hanoi School of Public Health; International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University.
    Bergström, Anna
    International Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University; Division of Global Health/IHCAR, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet.
    Wallin, Lars
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet.
    Bui, Ha T T
    Hanoi School of Public Health.
    Eriksson, Leif
    nternational Maternal and Child Health (IMCH), Department of Women's and Children's Health, Uppsala University.
    Eldh, Ann Catrine
    School of Education, Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University; Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet.
    Exploring the influence of context in a community-based facilitation intervention focusing on neonatal health and survival in Vietnam: a qualitative study.2015In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 814Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: In the Neonatal health - Knowledge into Practice (NeoKIP) trial in Vietnam, local stakeholder groups, supported by trained laywomen acting as facilitators, promoted knowledge translation (KT) resulting in decreased neonatal mortality. In general, as well as in the community-based NeoKIP trial, there is a need to further understand how context influences KT interventions in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs). Thus, the objective of this study was to explore the influence of context on the facilitation process in the NeoKIP intervention.

    METHODS: A secondary content analysis was performed on 16 Focus Group Discussions with facilitators and participants of the stakeholder groups, applying an inductive approach to the content on context through naïve understanding and structured analysis.

    RESULTS: The three main-categories of context found to influence the facilitation process in the NeoKIP intervention were: (1) Support and collaboration of local authorities and other communal stakeholders; (2) Incentives to, and motivation of, participants; and (3) Low health care coverage and utilization. In particular, the role of local authorities in a KT intervention was recognized as important. Also, while project participants expected financial incentives, non-financial benefits such as individual learning were considered to balance the lack of reimbursement in the NeoKIP intervention. Further, project participants recognized the need to acknowledge the needs of disadvantaged groups.

    CONCLUSIONS: This study provides insight for further understanding of the influence of contextual aspects to improve effects of a KT intervention in Vietnam. We suggest that future KT interventions should apply strategies to improve local authorities' engagement, to identify and communicate non-financial incentives, and to make disadvantaged groups a priority. Further studies to evaluate the contextual aspects in KT interventions in LMICs are also needed.

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  • 23.
    Ek, Anna
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nystrom, Christine Delisle
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Chirita-Emandi, Adela
    Univ Med and Farm Timisoara, Romania; Louis Turcanu Clin Emergency Hosp Children, Romania.
    Tur, Josep A.
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Nordin, Karin
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bouzas, Cristina
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Argelich, Emma
    Univ Balearic Isl, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Alfredo Martinez, J.
    Inst Carlos III, Spain; Univ Navarra, Spain; IMDEA Food Precis Nutr, Spain.
    Frost, Gary
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Garcia-Perez, Isabel
    Imperial Coll London, England.
    Saez, Marc
    Univ Girona, Spain; Inst Carlos III, Spain.
    Paul, Corina
    Univ Med and Farm Timisoara, Romania; Clin Emergency Cty Hosp Timisoara, Romania.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Nowicka, Paulina
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A randomized controlled trial for overweight and obesity in preschoolers: the More and Less Europe study- an intervention within the STOP project2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, article id 945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundChildhood overweight and obesity is a serious public health issue with an increase being observed in preschool-aged children. Treating childhood obesity is difficult and few countries use standardized treatments. Therefore, there is a need to find effective approaches that are feasible for both health care providers and families. Thus, the overall aim of this study is to assess the acceptance and effectiveness of a parent support program (the More and Less, ML) for the management of overweight and obesity followed by a mobile health (mHealth) program (the MINISTOP application) in a socially diverse population of families.Methods/designA two-arm, parallel design randomized controlled trial in 300 2-to 6-year-old children with overweight and obesity from Romania, Spain and Sweden (n=100 from each). Following baseline assessments children are randomized into the intervention or control group in a 1:1 ratio. The intervention, the ML program, consists of 10-weekly group sessions which focus on evidence-based parenting practices, followed by the previously validated MINISTOP application for 6-months to support healthy eating and physical activity behaviors. The primary outcome is change in body mass index (BMI) z-score after 9-months and secondary outcomes include: waist circumference, eating behavior (Child Eating Behavior Questionnaire), parenting behavior (Comprehensive Feeding Practices Questionnaire), physical activity (ActiGraph wGT3x-BT), dietary patterns (based onmetabolic markers from urine and 24h dietary recalls), epigenetic and gut hormones (fasting blood samples), and the overall acceptance of the overweight and obesity management in young children (semi-structured interviews). Outcomes are measured at baseline and after: 10-weeks (only BMI z-score, waist circumference), 9-months (all outcomes), 15- and 21-months (all outcomes except physical activity, dietary patterns, epigenetics and gut hormones) post-baseline.DiscussionThis study will evaluate a parent support program for weight management in young children in three European countries. To boost the effect of the ML program the families will be supported by an app for 6-months. If the program is found to be effective, it has the potential to be implemented into routine care to reduce overweight and obesity in young children and the app could prove to be a viable option for sustained effects of the care provided.Trial registrationClinicalTrials.gov NCT03800823; 11 Jan 2019.

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  • 24.
    Engström, Sven G
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Lennart
    The Neurotec Department, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl-Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Gunnar H.
    The Neurotec Department, Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The importance of comorbidity in analysing patient costs in Swedish primary care2006In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 36-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The objective was to explore the usefulness of the morbidity risk adjustment system Adjusted Clinical Groups® (ACG), in comparison with age and gender, in explaining and estimating patient costs on an individual level in Swedish primary health care. Data were retrieved from two primary health care centres in southeastern Sweden.

    Methods

    A cross-sectional observational study. Data from electronic patient registers from the two centres were retrieved for 2001 and 2002, and patients were grouped into ACGs, expressing the individual combination of diagnoses and thus the comorbidity. Costs per patient were calculated for both years in both centres. Cost data from one centre were used to create ACG weights. These weights were then applied to patients at the other centre. Correlations between individual patient costs, age, gender and ACG weights were studied. Multiple linear regression analyses were performed in order to explain and estimate patient costs.

    Results

    The variation in individual patient costs was substantial within age groups as well as within ACG weight groups. About 37.7% of the individual patient costs could be explained by ACG weights, and age and gender added about 0.8%. The individual patient costs in 2001 estimated 22.0% of patient costs in 2002, whereas ACG weights estimated 14.3%.

    Conclusion

    ACGs was an important factor in explaining and estimating individual patient costs in primary health care. Costs were explained to only a minor extent by age and gender. However, the usefulness of the ACG system appears to be sensitive to the accuracy of classification and coding of diagnoses by physicians.

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  • 25.
    Fagerberg, Petter
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Langley, Billy
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Oraysky, Aleksandra
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sandborg, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ioakimidis, Ioannis
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ultra-processed food advertisements dominate the food advertising landscape in two Stockholm areas with low vs high socioeconomic status. Is it time for regulatory action?2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, BMC PUBLIC HEALTH, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1717Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Ultra-processed food consumption is a risk factor for obesity and has a negative environmental impact. Food companies spend billions of dollars on advertisements each year to increase the consumption of ultra-processed food. In Australia, USA, and New Zealand, most food advertisements around schools and in train stations promote ultra-processed food, but no similar studies have been conducted in Sweden. The aim of this study was to explore the proportion of ultra-processed food advertisements in two districts of Stockholm, Sweden with low vs. high socioeconomic status (SES).

    Methods

    Two independent researchers (per area) mapped all advertisements, including storefronts, in two Stockholm districts. During consecutive days, all advertisements were photographed in Skärholmen (low SES district), and Östermalmstorg (high SES district), on the streets inside and outside the subway stations, as well as inside and outside of local shopping malls. Advertisements promoting food products were identified and a trained dietician categorized whether they promoted ultra-processed foods. Chi-Square test was conducted to test for differences in the proportion of ultra-processed food advertisements between the two study areas.

    Results

    In total, 4092 advertisements were photographed in Skärholmen (n = 1935) and Östermalm (n = 2157). 32.8% of all advertisements promoted food, while 65.4% of food advertisements promoted ultra-processed foods. A significantly higher proportion of ultra-processed food advertisements out of total food advertisements was identified in the low SES area, irrespective of the researcher taking the pictures (74.6% vs. 61.8%, p < 0.001 and 70.4% vs. 54.8%, p = 0.001). There was no significant difference in the proportion of food advertisements out of total advertisements between the two areas.

    Conclusions

    This study provides initial evidence about the scale and the differences in exposure to food advertisements across areas in Stockholm. The observed high proportion of ultra-processed food advertisements is concerning and is in sharp contrast to the Swedish dietary guidelines that recommend reduced consumption of such foods. Based on our results, residents in low SES areas might be more exposed to ultra-processed food advertisements than those in high SES areas in Stockholm. If such findings are confirmed in additional areas, they should be considered during the deployment of food advertisement regulatory actions.

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  • 26.
    Fagerlind Ståhl, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Smith, Peter
    Inst Work and Hlth, Canada; Univ Toronto, Canada; Monash Univ, Australia.
    Longitudinal association between psychological demands and burnout for employees experiencing a high versus a low degree of job resources2018In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 18, article id 915Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Exhaustion and burnout are common causes for sickness absence. This study examines the relationship between psychological demands and burnout over time, and if environmental support modifies the longitudinal relationship between psychological demands and burnout at baseline, with burnout measured 2 years subsequently. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to employees in seven Swedish organizations in 2010-2012 with follow-up after 2 years, n = 1722 responded (64%). Linear regressions were used to examine the associations between burnout and psychological demands at baseline and burnout at follow-up. Stratified regression models examined if relationships between burnout and psychological demands at baseline on burnout at follow-up differed for employees in supportive versus unsupportive work environments. Results: Burnout and psychological demands at baseline were associated with burnout at follow-up, after adjustment for study covariates. No significant differences were observed between estimates for psychological demands and burnout among respondents in supportive work environments versus those in unsupportive work environments. Conclusions: This study shows that high demands are associated with greater risk of burnout, regardless of level of other work supports. This has implications for prevention of sick leave due to burnout and for rehabilitation, where demands such as work pace, workload and conflicting demands at work may need to be reduced.

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  • 27.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Neurology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Soderhamn, Olle
    University of West, Sweden .
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping.
    Work capacity and health-related quality of life among individuals with multiple sclerosis reduced by fatigue: a cross-sectional study2013In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Among individuals diagnosed with the chronic neurologic disease, multiple sclerosis (MS), a majority suffers from fatigue, which strongly influences their every-day-life. The aim of this study was to investigate work capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in a group of MS patients and also to investigate if work capacity and HRQoL could be predicted by background factors, fatigue, heat sensitivity, cognitive dysfunction, emotional distress or degree of disability. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A descriptive, cross-sectional, designed survey was undertaken A questionnaire was sent to 323 individuals diagnosed with MS, aged between 20 and 65 years, with physical disability on the expanded disability status score (EDSS) in the interval 0 andgt;= EDSS andlt;= 6.5, living in sterg"tland county in eastern Sweden. Questions on background factors, occupation and work, together with the health-related quality of life short form instrument (SF-36), the fatigue severity scale (FSS), the perceived deficit questionnaire (PDQ) and the hospital anxiety depression scale (HAD) were posed. Associations between variables were analyzed using Pearsons and Spearmans correlations. Differences between groups were tested using the Chi-square test, the Mann Whitney U-test, and the Students t-test. Predictive factors were analyzed using multiple linear and multiple logistic regression analysis. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Of those who completed the questionnaire (n = 257, 79.6%), 59.8% were working. Work capacity was found significantly more among men (p andlt; 0.005), those with a higher level of education (p andlt; 0.001), those reporting less fatigue (p andlt; 0.001), and those having no heat sensitivity (p = 0.004). For work capacity, significant predictors were low physical disability (EDSS), low fatigue, higher level of education, male sex and lower age. Those with work capacity showed significantly higher HRQoL than those who had no work capacity (p andlt; 0.001). Levels of fatigue, cognition and emotional distress were found to be major contributing factors for HRQoL. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: Work capacity and HRQoL among individuals diagnosed with MS are highly influenced by fatigue which can be considered as a key symptom. Work capacity was influenced by heat-sensitivity, cognitive difficulties and emotional distress and significant predictive factors besides fatigue, were physical disability (EDSS), age, sex, and level of education. Remaining at work also gives a better HRQoL.

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  • 28.
    Granström, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Hans-Georg
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Molarius, Anu
    Regional Västmanland, Sweden; Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Economic stress and condescending treatment in childhood and adult self-rated health: results from a population study in Sweden2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Even today, 12% of the children in Sweden live in poverty and many children are exposed to adverse experiences, such as being bullied, which may have long-term consequences on public health. This study examined the associations between economic stress and condescending treatment in childhood and self-rated health (SRH) in adulthood. Methods: The study is based on 26,706 persons who responded to a postal survey questionnaire sent to a random sample of men and women aged 25-84 years in 2012 (response rate 53%). The associations between childhood circumstances and adult SRH were analysed by logistic regression, adjusting for sex, age, economic stress in adulthood, condescending treatment in adulthood, socioeconomic status and several other known material, behavioural and psychosocial risk factors. Results: In total, 39% of both men and women reported economic stress in their family during childhood. 36% of the men and 41% of the women indicated that they had been treated in a condescending manner, e.g. in school or at home, during childhood. Both economic stress in childhood and condescending treatment in childhood were strongly associated with adult SRH. The associations attenuated, but were still statistically significant after adjustment for adulthood circumstances and other risk factors. Conclusion: Economic stress in childhood and condescending treatment in childhood were associated with SRH in adulthood, both independently and through adulthood circumstances. The results underline the importance of taking into account both material and psychosocial circumstances over the whole life course when developing public health measures.

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  • 29.
    Henriksson, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Alexandrou, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Henriksson, Pontus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Henstrom, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomas, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    MINISTOP 2.0: a smartphone app integrated in primary child health care to promote healthy diet and physical activity behaviours and prevent obesity in preschool-aged children: protocol for a hybrid design effectiveness-implementation study2020In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 20, no 1, article id 1756Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BackgroundChildhood obesity is still a major health problem in many countries, including Sweden. Childhood obesity and obesity-related behaviours in childhood, such as low physical activity and unhealthy eating habits, tend to track into adulthood, which highlights the need for early prevention. Our aims are to evaluate whether a parent-oriented mobile health app (the MINISTOP 2.0 app) integrated into primary child health care can improve diet and physical activity behaviours and reduce the prevalence of overweight and obesity in preschool-aged children as well as to evaluate the implementation among child health care nurses and parents.MethodsThis trial uses a hybrid type 1 effectiveness-implementation design. Families (n=500) who attend a routine visit to one of 15-20 primary child health care centres throughout Sweden, when their child is 2.5years, are offered participation in a randomised controlled trial (effectiveness evaluation). After acceptance, families will be randomised (1:1) to control or intervention groups. The intervention group receives a 6-month parent-oriented smartphone intervention aimed at improving the dietary and activity behaviours of their child (the MINISTOP 2.0 app) and the control group receives routine child health care. Dietary habits, physical activity and screen time (primary outcomes), body weight and height in children, and parental self-efficacy (secondary outcomes) are measured at baseline and at 6months post randomisation. Implementation outcomes (i.e. perceived acceptability, appropriateness, and feasibility) of the intervention will be assessed among primary child health care nurses and parents in the trial through questionnaires and qualitative interviews.DiscussionThis trial will evaluate whether the MINISTOP 2.0 app can be used in primary child health care to improve diet and physical activity behaviours, and prevent overweight and obesity, in preschool-aged children. If effectiveness is proven, and the MINISTOP 2.0 app is considered acceptable, appropriate and feasible, it can be implemented nationally as part of the preventive strategies to combat childhood obesity provided by routine child health care.Trial registrationThe trial was registered at the Clinicaltrials.gov register platform (ID NCT04147039) on 31 October 2019.

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  • 30.
    Hultin, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Alexandersson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Christina, Lindholm
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Clinical Neuroscience.
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Uppsala University, Department of Medical Sciences.
    Möller, Jette
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Work-related psychosocial events as triggers of sickleave – results from a Swedish case-crossover study2011In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 11, no 175Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Although illness is an important cause of sick leave, it has also been suggested that

    non-medical risk factors may influence this association. If such factors impact on the

    period of decision making, they should be considered as triggers. Yet, there is no

    empirical support available.

    The aim was to investigate whether recent exposure to work-related psychosocial

    events can trigger the decision to report sick when ill.

    Methods

    A case-crossover design was applied to 546 sick-leave spells, extracted from a

    Swedish cohort of 1 430 employees with a 3-12 month follow-up of new sick-leave

    spells. Exposure in a case period corresponding to an induction period of one or two

    days was compared with exposure during control periods sampled from workdays

    during a two-week period prior to sick leave for the same individual. This was done

    according to the matched-pair interval and the usual frequency approaches. Results

    are presented as odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI).

    Results

    Most sick-leave spells happened in relation to acute, minor illnesses that substantially

    reduced work ability. The risk of taking sick leave was increased when individuals

    had recently been exposed to problems in their relationship with a superior (OR 3.63;

    CI 1.44-9.14) or colleagues (OR 4.68; CI 1.43-15.29). Individuals were also more

    inclined to report sick on days when they expected a very stressful work situation than

    on a day when they were not under such stress (OR 2.27; CI 1.40-3.70).

    Conclusions

    Exposure to problems in workplace relationships or a stressful work situation seems

    to be able to trigger reporting sick. Psychosocial work-environmental factors appear

    to have a short-term effect on individuals when deciding to report sick.

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  • 31.
    Högberg, Hjördis
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Psykiat Skåne Div, Sweden.
    Skagerström, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Spak, Fredrik
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson, Margareta
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Alcohol consumption among partners of pregnant women in Sweden: a cross sectional study2016In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, no 694Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Antenatal care in Sweden involves a visit in pregnancy week 6-7 for counseling about lifestyle issues, including alcohol. The aim of this study was to investigate alcohol consumption among partners of pregnant women, their motives for changing drinking patterns when becoming a parent and their perceptions of the midwifes counseling about alcohol. Method: The study was conducted at 30 antenatal care centers across Sweden in 2009-2010. All partners who accompanied a pregnant women in pregnancy week amp;gt;17 were asked to participate. The questionnaire included questions on alcohol consumption. Results: Questionnaires from 444 partners were analyzed. Most, 95 %, of the partners reported alcohol consumption before pregnancy; 18 % were binge drinking (6 standard drinks or more per occasion, each drink containing 12 grams of pure alcohol) at least once every month during the last year. More than half, 58 %, of all partners had decreased their alcohol consumption following pregnancy recognition and a higher proportion of binge drinkers decreased their consumption compared to non-frequent binge drinkers (p = 0.025). Their motives varied; the pregnancy itself, fewer social gatherings (potentially involving alcohol consumption) and a sense of responsibility for the pregnant partner were reported. Of the partners, 37 % reported support for decreased drinking from others (pregnant partner, parents, friend or workmates). Further, most partners appreciated the midwifes counseling on alcohol. Conclusion: A majority of partners decreased their alcohol consumption in transition to parenthood, which also appears to be a crucial time for changing alcohol-drinking patterns. The partners with higher AUDIT-C scores reported more support for decreased drinking. Most partners appreciated the midwifes talk about alcohol and pregnancy and those who filled out AUDIT in early pregnancy reported that the counseling was more engaging. During pregnancy it is possible to detect partners with high alcohol consumption, and promote interventions for decreased drinking, also for the partners. Written information addressing alcohol use and directed to partners is needed.

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  • 32.
    Jansson Fagring, A.
    et al.
    IThe Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Rosengren, A.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Lissner, L.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy, Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Manhem, K.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Welin, C.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Mölndal, Göteborg, Sweden .
    Depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life in men and women with unexplained chest pain2008In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 8, p. 165-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    Unexplained chest pain (UCP) is a common reason for emergency hospital admission and generates considerable health-care costs for society. Even though prior research indicates that psychological problems and impaired quality of life are common among UCP patients, there is lack of knowledge comparing UCP patients with a reference group from the general population. The aim of this study was to analyse differences between men and women with UCP and a reference group in terms of psychosocial factors as depression, anxiety, stress, social interaction and health-related quality of life (HRQOL).

    METHODS:

    A self-administered questionnaire about psychosocial factors was completed by 127 men and 104 women with acute UCP admitted consecutively to the Emergency Department (ED) or as in-patients on a medical ward. A reference group from the general population, 490 men and 579 women, participants in the INTERGENE study and free of clinical heart disease, were selected.

    RESULTS:

    The UCP patients were more likely to be immigrants, have a sedentary lifestyle, report stress at work and have symptoms of depression and trait-anxiety compared with the reference group. After adjustment for differences in age, smoking, hypertension and diabetes, these factors were still significantly more common among patients with UCP. In a stepwise multivariate model with mutual adjustment for psychosocial factors, being an immigrant was associated with a more than twofold risk in both sexes. Stress at work was associated with an almost fourfold increase in risk among men, whereas there was no independent impact for women. In contrast, depression only emerged as an independent risk factor in women. Trait-anxiety and a low level of social interaction were not independently associated with risk in either men or women. Patients with UCP were two to five times more likely to have low scores for HRQOL.

    CONCLUSION:

    Both men and women with UCP had higher depression scores than referents, but an independent association was only found in women. Among men, perceived stress at work emerged as the only psychosocial variable significantly associated with UCP

  • 33.
    Johansson, Lisbeth M.
    et al.
    Linköping University. Futurum Acad Hlth & Care, Sweden; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Lingfors, Hans
    Linköping University. Futurum Acad Hlth & Care, Sweden.
    Golsäter, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; Futurum Acad Hlth & Care, Sweden.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Fransson, Eleonor I
    Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Physical activity related to mastery and vitality in a Swedish adult population with economic difficulties2021In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 2193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background People with low socio-economic status report lower levels of physical activity (PA). There is insufficient knowledge about the availability of psychological resources for those who are physically active despite having a low socio-economic status. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between PA level and mastery and vitality, respectively, within an adult population with self-reported economic difficulties. Method Data from a cross-sectional, population-based study (n = 817) were used. Linear regression was used to estimate the unstandardised regression coefficient (beta) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI), describing associations between PA levels (independent variable) and scale scores of psychological resources in terms of mastery and vitality (outcome variables). Three models were constructed: Model I unadjusted; Model II adjusted for sex and age; and Model III adjusted for sex, age, smoking and food quality. Result After adjusting for sex, age, smoking and food quality and using low-level PA as the reference, high-level PA, but not intermediate-level PA, was related to higher scale scores of mastery (beta = 0.72 [95% CI 0.08 to 1.37]). For vitality, both high-level PA and intermediate-level PA were related to higher scale scores (beta = 9.30 [95% CI 5.20 to 13.40] and beta = 6.70 [95% CI 1.40 to 12.00] respectively). Conclusion In an adult population with self-reported economic difficulties, higher levels of physical activity were related to higher mastery and vitality. Our results support that the association between physical activity and psychological resources in terms of mastery and vitality should be considered in the context of targeted health dialogues.

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  • 34.
    Karlson, Bjorn
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Jonsson, Peter
    Lund University.
    Palsson, Birgitta
    Lund University.
    Abjornsson, Gunnel
    Lund University.
    Malmberg, Birgitta
    Lund University.
    Larsson, Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Osterberg, Kai
    Lund University.
    Return to work after work after a workplace-oriented intervention for patients on sick-leave for burnout - a prospective controlled study2010In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the present study the effect of a workplace-oriented intervention for persons on long-term sick leave for clinical burnout, aimed at facilitating return to work (RTW) by job-person match through patient-supervisor communication, was evaluated. We hypothesised that the intervention group would show a more successful RTW than a control group. Methods: In a prospective controlled study, subjects were identified by the regional social insurance office 2-6 months after the first day on sick leave. The intervention group (n = 74) was compared to a control group who had declined participation, being matched by length of sick leave (n = 74). The RTW was followed up, using sick-listing register data, until 1.5 years after the time of intervention. Results: There was a linear increase of RTW in the intervention group during the 1.5-year follow-up period, and 89% of subjects had returned to work to some extent at the end of the follow-up period. The increase in RTW in the control group came to a halt after six months, and only 73% had returned to work to some extent at the end of the 1.5-year follow-up. Conclusions: We conclude that the present study demonstrated an improvement of long-term RTW after a workplace-oriented intervention for patients on long-term sick leave due to burnout. Trial registration: Current Controlled Trials NCT01039168.

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  • 35.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Emotional support predicts more sickness absence and poorer self assessed work ability: a two-year prospective cohort study2010In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 648-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: While back pain and stressful work environment are shown to be important causes of sickness absence the effect of psychosocial resources on sickness absence, and on self assessed work ability, is less commonly investigated. The aim of this study was to assess these associations in a two-year follow-up study.

    METHODS: 341 working people aged 45 to 64, randomly drawn from the population, responded to a questionnaire at baseline and at a two-year follow-up. Poisson regression was used to analyse the association of psychosocial factors (psychosocial instruments on work environment, emotional support and psychological resources) and previous back pain (low back and/or neck) at baseline with sickness absence (spells and days) at follow-up, controlling for effects of age, sex, BMI, smoking, alcohol, occupation, disease and previous sickness absence. Logistic regression was used to study the associations of psychosocial factors and previous back pain at baseline with self assessed prognosis of poor work ability six months from follow-up. Finally, a multivariate analysis tested the independent effects of previous back pain and 3 psychosocial factors derived in a factor analysis: 1. work environment; 2. emotional support; 3. psychological resources, on work ability and absence days and spells.

    RESULTS: 80% of the sickness absence spells within the last 12 months before follow-up were short-term (<= 14 days). In the final model, high emotional support predicted more sickness absence spells (RR 1.36; 1.11-1.67) and days (RR 1.68, 1.22-2.31). Previous back pain (OR 2.56; 1.13-5.81), high emotional support (OR 1.58; 1.02-2.46), and low psychological resources (OR 0.62; 0.44-0.89) were related to poorer self assessed prognosis of work ability at follow up.

    CONCLUSIONS: In a general middle aged working population high emotional support was related to more sickness absence and also poorer self assessed prognosis of work ability. Our findings suggest that both sickness absence and self assessed work ability are dependent of life outside work and can be affected by a person's close community.

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  • 36.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Sociologiska institutionen, Sweden.
    Ahacic, Kozma
    Karolinska Institutet & Stockholm University, Sweden; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Bias in estimates of alcohol use among older people: selection effects due to design, health, and cohort replacement2015In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 15, article id 769Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: There is a growing awareness of the need to include the oldest age groups in the epidemiological monitoring of alcohol consumption. This poses a number of challenges and this study sets out to examine the possible selection effects due to survey design, health status, and cohort replacement on estimates of alcohol use among the oldest old. Methods: Analyses were based on three repeated cross-sectional interview surveys from 1992, 2002 and 2011, with relatively high response rates (86 %). The samples were nationally representative of the Swedish population aged 77+ (total n = 2022). Current alcohol use was assessed by the question How often do you drink alcoholic beverages, such as wine, beer or spirits? Alcohol use was examined in relation to survey design (response rate, use of proxy interviews and telephone interviews), health (institutional living, limitations with Activities of Daily Living and mobility problems) and birth cohort (in relation to age and period). Two outcomes were studied using binary and ordered logistic regression; use of alcohol and frequency of use among alcohol users. Results: Higher estimates of alcohol use, as well as more frequent use, were associated with lower response rates, not using proxy interviews and exclusion of institutionalized respondents. When adjusted for health, none of these factors related to the survey design were significant. Moreover, the increase in alcohol use during the period was fully explained by cohort replacement. This cohort effect was also at least partially confounded by survey design and health effects. Results were similar for both outcomes. Conclusions: Survey non-participation in old age is likely to be associated with poor health and low alcohol consumption. Failure to include institutionalized respondents or those who are difficult to recruit is likely to lead to an overestimation of alcohol consumption, whereas basing prevalence on older data, at least in Sweden, is likely to underestimate the alcohol use of the oldest old. Trends in alcohol consumption in old age are highly sensitive for cohort effects. When analysing age-period-cohort effects, it is important to be aware of these health and design issues as they may lead to incorrect conclusions.

  • 37.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Lindqvist, Kent
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Correlates of local safety-related concerns in a Swedish Community: a cross-sectional study2009In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 9, no 221Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Crime in a neighbourhood has been recognized as a key stressor in the residential environment. Fear of crime is related to risk assessment, which depends on the concentration of objective risk in time and space, and on the presence of subjective perceived early signs of imminent hazard. The aim of the study was to examine environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns at the local level in urban communities. The specific aim was to investigate such correlates in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish urban municipality. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to investigate three neighbourhood settings with two pair-wise conterminous but socially contrasting areas within each setting. Crime data were retrieved from police records. Study data were collected through a postal questionnaire distributed to adult residents (n = 2476) (response rate 56%). Composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were derived through a factor analysis. Logistic regression analysis was used to examine associations between high-level scores of the three safety-related dimensions and area-level crime rate, being a victim of crime, area reputation, gender, age, education, country of birth, household civil status and type of housing. Results: Three composite dimensions of perceived residential safety were identified: (I) structural indicators of social disorder; (II) contact with disorderly behavior; and (III) existential insecurity. We found that area-level crime rates and individual-level variables were associated with the dimensions structural indicators of social disorder and existential insecurity, but only individual-level variables were associated with the dimension contact with disorderly behavior. Self-assessed less favorable area reputation was found to be strongly associated with all three factors. Being female accorded existential insecurity more than being a victim of crime. Conclusion: We have identified environmental, socio-demographic, and personal correlates of safety-related concerns in contiguous neighbourhoods in a Swedish community. The results of this study suggest that residents self-assessed area reputation is an important underlying mechanism of perceived safety. We also found a difference in crime rates and safety-related concerns between areas with blocks of flats compared with small-scale areas although the neighbourhoods were close geographically.

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  • 38.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lornudd, Caroline
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Björklund, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bergström, Gunnar
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; University of Gävle, Gävle, Sweden.
    Nybergh, Lotta
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Elinder, Liselotte Schäfer
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden; Centre for Epidemiology and Community Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Lund, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Lund, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Implementation of the Swedish Guideline for Prevention of Mental ill-health at the Workplace: study protocol of a cluster randomized controlled trial, using multifaceted implementation strategies in schools2019In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 19, no 1, article id 1668Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Given today's high prevalence of common mental disorders and related sick leave among teachers, an urgent need exists for a more systematic approach to the management of social and organizational risk factors within schools. In 2015, we launched the first Swedish occupational health guideline to support a structured prevention of these risks at the workplace. The existence of guidelines does however not guarantee their usage, as studies show that guidelines are often underused. Knowledge is therefore needed on effective implementation strategies that can facilitate the translation of guidelines into practice. The primary aim of the randomized waiting list-controlled trial described in this study protocol is to compare the effectiveness of a multifaceted implementation strategy versus a single implementation strategy for implementing the Guideline for the prevention of mental ill-health at the workplace within schools. The effectiveness will be compared regarding the extent to which the recommendations are implemented (implementation effectiveness) and with regard to social and organisational risk factors for mental ill-health, absenteeism and presenteeism (intervention effectiveness).

    METHODS: The trial is conducted among primary schools of two municipalities in Sweden. The single implementation strategy is an educational strategy (an educational meeting). The multifaceted strategy consists of the educational meeting, an implementation team and a series of workshops. The outcome measure of implementation effectiveness is guideline adherence. The primary outcome of intervention effectiveness is exhaustion. Secondary outcomes include demands at work, work organization and job contents, interpersonal relations and leadership, presenteeism, work performance, recovery, work-life balance, work-engagement, self-reported stress, self-perceived health, sickness absence and psychosocial safety climate. Process outcomes as well as barriers and facilitators influencing the implementation process are assessed. Data will be collected at baseline, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months by mixed methods (i.e. survey, focus-group interviews, observation).

    DISCUSSION: The study described in this protocol will provide valuable knowledge on the effectiveness of implementation strategies for implementing a guideline for the prevention of common mental disorders within schools. We hypothesize that successful implementation will result in reductions in school personnel's perceived social and organizational risk factors, mental ill-health and sick-leave.

    TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT03322839 (trial registration: 09/19/2017).

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  • 39.
    Kwak, Lydia
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wåhlin, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Center. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stigmar, Kjerstin
    Lund University, Sweden; Skåne University Hospital, Sweden.
    Jensen, Irene
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Developing a practice guideline for the occupational health services by using a community of practice approach: a process evaluation of the development process2017In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 17, article id 89Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: One way to facilitate the translation of research into the occupational health service practice is through clinical practice guidelines. To increase the implementability of guidelines it is important to include the end-users in the development, for example by a community of practice approach. This paper describes the development of an occupational health practice guideline aimed at the management of non-specific low back pain (LBP) by using a community of practice approach. The paper also includes a process evaluation of the development providing insight into the feasibility of the process. Methods: A multidisciplinary community of practice group (n = 16) consisting of occupational nurses, occupational physicians, ergonomists/physical therapists, health and safety engineers, health educators, psychologists and researchers from different types of occupational health services and geographical regions within Sweden met eleven times (June 2012-December 2013) to develop the practice guideline following recommendations of guideline development handbooks. Process-outcomes recruitment, reach, context, satisfaction, feasibility and fidelity were assessed by questionnaire, observations and administrative data. Results: Group members attended on average 7.5 out of 11 meetings. Half experienced support from their workplace for their involvement. Feasibility was rated as good, except for time-scheduling. Most group members were satisfied with the structure of the process (e.g. presentations, multidisciplinary group). Fidelity was rated as fairly high. Conclusions: The described development process is a feasible process for guideline development. For future guideline development expectations of the work involved should be more clearly communicated, as well as the purpose and tasks of the CoP-group. Moreover, possibilities to improve support from managers and colleagues should be explored. This paper has important implications for future guideline development; it provides valuable information on how practitioners can be included in the development process, with the aim of increasing the implementability of the developed guidelines.

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  • 40.
    Leijon, Matti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Stark Ekman, Diana
    Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of Social Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, HELIX Vinn Excellence Centre. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walter, Lars
    Landstinget i Östergötland; Centre for Public Health Sciences; Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Ståhle, Agneta
    Department of Neurobiology, Health Care Sciences and Society, Division of Physiotherapy, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Is there a demand for physical activity interventions from health care providers?: Findings from a population survey2010In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 10, no 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Health care providers in many countries have delivered interventions to improve physical activity levels among their patients. Thus far, less is known about the population's interest to increase their physical activity levels and their opinion about the health care provider's role in physical activity promotion. The aims of this paper were to investigate the self-reported physical activity levels of the population and intention to increase physical activity levels, self-perceived need for support, and opinions about the responsibilities of both individuals and health care providers to promote physical activity.

    Methods: A regional public health survey was mailed to 13 440 adults (aged 18-84 years) living in Östergötland County (Sweden) in 2006. The survey was part of the regular effort by the regional Health Authorities.

    Results: About 25% of the population was categorised as physically active, 38% as moderately active, 27% as somewhat active, and 11% as low active. More than one-third (37%) had no intentions to increase their physical activity levels, 36% had thought about change, while 27% were determined to change. Lower intention to change was mainly associated with increased age and lower education levels. 28% answered that physical activity was the most important health-related behaviour to change "right now" and 15% of those answered that they wanted or needed support to make this change. Of respondents who might be assumed to be in greatest need of increased activity (i.e. respondents reporting poor general health, BMI>30, and inactivity) more than one-quarter wanted support to make improvements to their health. About half of the respondents who wanted support to increase their physical activity levels listed health care providers as a primary source for support.

    Conclusion: These findings suggest that there is considerable need for physical activity interventions in this population. Adults feel great responsibility for their own physical activity levels, but also attribute responsibility for promoting increased physical activity to health care practitioners.

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  • 41.
    Liljegren, Mats
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Kerstin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The longitudinal relationship between job mobility, perceived organizational justice, and health2008In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 8, no 164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The main purpose of the present study was to examine the 2-year longitudinal and reciprocal relationship between job mobility and health and burnout. A second aim was to elucidate the effects of perceived organizational justice and turnover intentions on the relationship between job mobility (non-, internally and externally mobile), and health (SF-36) and burnout (CBI). METHODS: The study used questionnaire data from 662 Swedish civil servants and the data were analysed with Structural Equation Modeling statistical methods. RESULTS: The results showed that job mobility was a better predictor of health and burnout, than health and burnout were as predictors of job mobility. The predictive effects were most obvious for psychosocial health and burnout, but negligible as far as physical health was concerned. Organizational justice was found to have a direct impact on health, but not on job mobility; whereas turnover intentions had a direct effect on job mobility. CONCLUSION: The predictive relationship between job mobility and health has practical implications for health promotive actions in different organizations.

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  • 42.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Norrköping.
    Lowén, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Society and Health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Regionledningskontoret, Enheten för folkhälsa.
    Faresjö, Tomas
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Prevention, Rehabilitation and Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    Linköping University, Department of Health, Medicine and Caring Sciences, Division of Diagnostics and Specialist Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Sandström, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Disease prevalence and number of health care visits among members of a nationwide sports organization compared to matched controls2021In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 21, no 1, article id 455Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Physical activity has positive effects on several diseases and may reduce the risk of morbidity and the mortality rate. Whether the prevalence of disease and health care consumption differ between the members of sports organizations and the general population has not been established. Hence, this pilot study aimed to compare the prevalence of diseases known to be associated with physical inactivity and health care consumption in members of a large non-profit sports organization and an age-, sex- and geographically matched random sample from the general population. Methods Subjects in two Swedish cities who exercised at least once a week and had been members for at least two years in the non-profit sports organization Friskis&Svettis were invited. A randomized age-, sex- and geographically matched sample was drawn from the general population. Data on disease prevalence (by International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision (ICD-10) codes) and health care consumption were retrieved using the members personal identification numbers through a regional health care database. Between-group differences in the prevalence of disease were compared using chi(2)-tests and logistic regression between members and controls. Health care consumption was defined as the number of visits, stratified by primary and hospital care, and was compared using chi(2)-tests and Mann-Whitney U-tests. Results In total, 3015 subjects were included in each group (response rate 11%). Controls had higher prevalence rates of musculoskeletal diseases (13.3% vs. 11.6%, p = 0.047), metabolic disease (10.4% vs. 5.4%, p &lt; 0.001), hypertension (16.6% vs. 11.7%, p &lt; 0.001), psychiatric diseases (8.9% vs. 7.1%, p = 0.012) and lung cancer (0.4% vs. 0%, p = 0.001) than the members. The total number of health care contacts was 22% higher in the controls than in the members, whereas the proportion of subjects with at least one health care visit was larger in the members (89% vs. 79%, p &lt; 0.001). Conclusions The prevalence rates of lifestyle diseases related to musculoskeletal, metabolic and psychiatric diseases, hypertension and lung cancer, and the overall health care consumption, were lower among members of a sports organization than among controls. However, longitudinal studies are needed to establish a cause-effect relationship between membership and disease development.

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  • 43.
    Lundberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bobak, Martin
    International Institute for Society and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCL, London, UK.
    Malyutina, Sofia
    Institute of Internal Medicine, Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Novosibirsk, Russia.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Pikhart, Hynek
    International Institute for Society and Health, Department of Epidemiology and Public Health, UCL, London, UK.
    Adverse health effects of low levels of perceived control in Swedish and Russian community samples2007In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 7, no 314Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: This cross-sectional study of two middle-aged community samples from Sweden and Russia examined the distribution of perceived control scores in the two populations, investigated differences in individual control items between the populations, and assessed the association between perceived control and self-rated health.

    Methods: The samples consisted of men and women aged 45–69 years, randomly selected from national and local population registers in southeast Sweden (n = 1007) and in Novosibirsk, Russia (n = 9231). Data were collected by structured questionnaires and clinical measures at a visit to a clinic. The questionnaire covered socioeconomic and lifestyle factors, societal circumstances, and psychosocial measures. Self-rated health was assessed by standard single question with five possible answers, with a cut-off point at the top two alternatives.

    Results: 32.2 % of Swedish men and women reported good health, compared to 10.3 % of Russian men and women. Levels of perceived control were also significantly lower in Russia than in Sweden and varied by socio-demographic parameters in both populations. Sub-item analysis of the control questionnaire revealed substantial differences between the populations both in the perception of control over life and over health. Logistic regression analysis revealed that the odds ratios (OR) of poor self-rated health were significantly increased in men and women with low perceived control in both countries (OR between 2.61 and 4.26).

    Conclusions: Although the cross-sectional design does not allow causal inference, these results support the view that perceived control influences health, and that it may mediate the link between socioeconomic hardship and health.

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  • 44.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Reineholm, Cathrine
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Ståhl, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    Wallo, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, HELIX Competence Centre.
    The impact of leadership on employee well-being: on-site compared to working from home2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 2154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The Covid-19 pandemic has brought significant changes to the way people work and there are several reasons to believe that working from home will become more common in the future. Yet more knowledge is needed on whether the effectiveness of leadership differs if the work is performed remotely compared to on-site work.

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine the place of work as a moderator for the effectiveness of leadership on employee well-being.Method: A survey was answered by 364 white-collar workers, employed by a larger Swedish municipality, who because of the covid-19-pandemic were offered to work from home.

    Results: The employees working in their regular office perceived having more sufficient work equipment. No other differences were found in the investigated variables. Supportive leadership was associated with all investigated well-being variables in the hypothesised directions. Place of work did not moderate the relationship between Support leadership and the investigated well-being outcomes (Job satisfaction, Stress, General well-being).

    Conclusion: This study shows that there are few differences between employees working from home or working on-site during the Covid-19 pandemic. The supportive leadership of the closest manager seem to be important for well-being regardless of the worksite.

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  • 45.
    Matsui, Kentaro
    et al.
    Natl Ctr Hosp, Japan.
    Chung, Frances
    Univ Toronto, Canada.
    Bjelajac, Adrijana Koscec
    Inst Med Res & Occupat Hlth, Croatia.
    Merikanto, Ilona
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Orton Orthopaed Hosp, Finland.
    Korman, Maria
    Ariel Univ, Israel.
    Mota-Rolim, Sergio
    Univ Fed Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.
    Cunha, Ana Suely
    Univ Potiguar, Brazil.
    Bjorvatn, Bjorn
    Univ Bergen, Norway; Haukeland Hosp, Norway.
    Xue, Pei
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Benedict, Christian
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Morin, Charles M.
    Univ Laval, Canada.
    Espie, Colin A.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Landtblom, Anne-Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences, Division of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Penzel, Thomas
    Charite, Germany.
    De Gennaro, Luigi
    Sapienza Univ Rome, Italy; IRCCS, Italy.
    Holzinger, Brigitte
    Med Univ Vienna, Austria.
    Hrubos-Strom, Harald
    Akershus Univ Hosp, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Leger, Damien
    Univ Paris Cite, France; Hop Hotel Dieu, France.
    Bolstad, Courtney J.
    Mississippi State Univ, MS USA; South Texas Vet Hlth Care Syst, TX USA.
    Nadorff, Michael R.
    Mississippi State Univ, MS USA.
    Plazzi, Giuseppe
    IRCCS Ist Sci Neurol Bologna, Italy; Univ Modena & Reggio Emilia, Italy.
    Reis, Catia
    Univ Catolica Portuguesa, Portugal; Univ Lisbon, Portugal.
    Chan, Ngan Yin
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Wing, Yun Kwok
    Chinese Univ Hong Kong, Peoples R China.
    Yordanova, Juliana
    Bulgarian Acad Sci, Bulgaria.
    Dauvilliers, Yves
    Univ Montpellier, France.
    Partinen, Markku
    Univ Helsinki, Finland; Terveystalo Healthcare Serv, Finland.
    Inoue, Yuichi
    Japan Somnol Ctr, Japan; Tokyo Med Univ, Japan.
    Associations between changes in habitual sleep duration and lower self-rated health among COVID-19 survivors: findings from a survey across 16 countries/regions2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 2352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Self-rated health (SRH) is widely recognized as a clinically significant predictor of subsequent mortality risk. Although COVID-19 may impair SRH, this relationship has not been extensively examined. The present study aimed to examine the correlation between habitual sleep duration, changes in sleep duration after infection, and SRH in subjects who have experienced SARS-CoV-2 infection.Methods Participants from 16 countries participated in the International COVID Sleep Study-II (ICOSS-II) online survey in 2021. A total of 10,794 of these participants were included in the analysis, including 1,509 COVID-19 individuals (who reported that they had tested positive for COVID-19). SRH was evaluated using a 0-100 linear visual analog scale. Habitual sleep durations of &lt; 6 h and &gt; 9 h were defined as short and long habitual sleep duration, respectively. Changes in habitual sleep duration after infection of &lt;= -2 h and &gt;= 1 h were defined as decreased or increased, respectively.Results Participants with COVID-19 had lower SRH scores than non-infected participants, and those with more severe COVID-19 had a tendency towards even lower SRH scores. In a multivariate regression analysis of participants who had experienced COVID-19, both decreased and increased habitual sleep duration after infection were significantly associated with lower SRH after controlling for sleep quality (beta = -0.056 and -0.058, respectively, both p &lt; 0.05); however, associations between current short or long habitual sleep duration and SRH were negligible. Multinomial logistic regression analysis showed that decreased habitual sleep duration was significantly related to increased fatigue (odds ratio [OR] = 1.824, p &lt; 0.01), shortness of breath (OR = 1.725, p &lt; 0.05), diarrhea/nausea/vomiting (OR = 2.636, p &lt; 0.01), and hallucinations (OR = 5.091, p &lt; 0.05), while increased habitual sleep duration was significantly related to increased fatigue (OR = 1.900, p &lt; 0.01).Conclusions Changes in habitual sleep duration following SARS-CoV-2 infection were associated with lower SRH. Decreased or increased habitual sleep duration might have a bidirectional relation with post-COVID-19 symptoms. Further research is needed to better understand the mechanisms underlying these relationships for in order to improve SRH in individuals with COVID-19.

  • 46.
    McCambridge, Jim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK, England.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    White, Ian R.
    Institute Public Heatlh, England .
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Health Care in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    Alcohol assessment and feedback by e-mail for university student hazardous and harmful drinkers: study protocol for the AMADEUS-2 randomised controlled trial2013In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 13, no 949Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Alcohol is responsible for a large and growing proportion of the global burden of disease, as well as being the cause of social problems. Brief interventions are one component of comprehensive policy measures necessary to reduce these harms. Brief interventions increasingly take advantage of the Internet to reach large numbers of high risk groups such as students. The research literature on the efficacy and effectiveness of online interventions is developing rapidly. Although many studies show benefits in the form of reduced consumption, other intervention studies show no effects, for reasons that are unclear. Sweden became the first country in the world to implement a national system in which all university students are offered a brief online intervention via an e-mail. Methods/Design: This randomized controlled trial (RCT) aims to evaluate the effectiveness of this national system comprising a brief online intervention among university students who are hazardous and harmful drinkers. This study employs a conventional RCT design in which screening to determine eligibility precedes random allocation to immediate or delayed access to online intervention. The online intervention evaluated comprises three main components; assessment, normative feedback and advice on reducing drinking. Screening is confined to a single question in order to minimise assessment reactivity and to prevent contamination. Outcomes will be evaluated after 2 months, with total weekly alcohol consumption being the primary outcome measure. Invitations to participate are provided by e-mail to approximately 55,000 students in 9 Swedish universities. Discussion: This RCT evaluates routine service provision in Swedish universities via a delay in offer of intervention to the control group. It evaluates effects in the key population for whom this intervention has been designed. Study findings will inform the further development of the national service provision.

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  • 47.
    Meinow, Bettina
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Stockholm Gerontol Res Ctr, Sweden.
    Li, Peng
    Max Planck Inst Demog Res, Germany.
    Jasilionis, Domantas
    Max Planck Inst Demog Res, Germany.
    Oksuzyan, Anna
    Max Planck Inst Demog Res, Germany; Bielefeld Univ, Germany.
    Sundberg, Louise
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Kelfve, Susanne
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Society, Division of Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden.
    Wastesson, Jonas W.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Stockholm Univ, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Trends over two decades in life expectancy with complex health problems among older Swedes: implications for the provision of integrated health care and social care2022In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 22, no 1, article id 759Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Due to population aging, it is essential to examine to what extent rises in life expectancy (LE) consist of healthy or unhealthy years. Most health expectancy studies have been based on single health measures and have shown divergent trends. We used a multi-domain indicator, complex health problems (CHP), indicative of the need for integrated medical and social care, to investigate how LE with and without CHP developed in Sweden between 1992 and 2011. We also addressed whether individuals with CHP more commonly lived in the community in 2011 compared to earlier years.

    Methods: CHP were defined as having severe problems in at least two of three health domains related to the need for medical and/or social care: symptoms/diseases, cognition/communication, and mobility. The Swedish Panel Study of Living Conditions of the Oldest Old (SWEOLD), a nationally representative survey of the Swedish population aged &gt;= 77 years with waves in 1992, 2002 and 2011 (n approximate to 2000), was used to estimate the prevalence of CHP. Age- and gender-specific death rates were obtained from the Human Mortality Database. The Sullivan method was deployed to calculate the remaining life expectancy with and without CHP. The estimates were decomposed to calculate the contribution of changes from morbidity and mortality to the overall trends in LE without CHP.

    Results: Between 1992 and 2011, both total LE (+ 1.69 years [95% CI 1.56;1.83] and LE without CHP (+ 0.84 years [-0,87;2.55]) at age 77 increased for men, whereas LE at age 77 increased for women (+ 1.33 [1.21;1.47]) but not LE without CHP (-0.06 years [-1.39;1.26]). When decomposing the trend, we found that the increase in LE with CHP was mainly driven by an increase in the prevalence of CHP. Among individuals with CHP the proportion residing in care homes was lower in 2011 (37%) compared to 2002 (58%) and 1992 (53%).

    Conclusions: The findings, that an increasing number of older people are expected to live more years with CHP, and increasingly live in the community, point towards a challenge for individuals and families, as well as for society in financing and organizing coordinated and coherent medical and social services.

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  • 48.
    Micklitz, Hannah M
    et al.
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Nagel, Zoë
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Jahn, Stella
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Oertelt-Prigione, Sabine
    Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands; Univ Bielefeld, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical and Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Sander, Lasse B
    Univ Freiburg, Germany.
    Digital self-help for people experiencing intimate partner violence: a qualitative study on user experiences and needs including people with lived experiences and services providers.2023In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 23, no 1, article id 1471Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a prevalent public health issue associated with multiple physical and mental health consequences for survivors. Digital interventions can provide low-threshold support to those experiencing IPV, but existing digital interventions have limited efficacy in improving the safety and mental health of IPV survivors. Digitally adapting an integrative intervention with advocacy-based and psychological content holds promise for increasing the efficacy of digital interventions in the context of IPV.

    METHODS: This study examines the needs, acceptability and usability of an integrative digital intervention for people affected by IPV. We used the think-aloud method and semi-structured interviews with a sample of six people with lived experiences of IPV and six service providers. We analyzed the data using thematic analysis.

    RESULTS: We identified the increasing general acceptance of digital support tools and the limited capacity of the current support system as societal context factors influencing the acceptance of and needs regarding digital interventions in the context of IPV. An integrative digital self-help intervention offers several opportunities to complement the current support system and to meet the needs of people affected by IPV, including the reduction of social isolation, a space for self-reflection and coping strategies to alleviate the situation. However, potentially ongoing violence, varying stages of awareness and psychological capacities, and as well as the diversity of IPV survivors make it challenging to develop a digital intervention suitable for the target group. We received feedback on the content of the intervention and identified design features required for intervention usability.

    CONCLUSION: An integrative digital self-help approach, with appropriate security measures and trauma-informed design, has the potential to provide well-accepted, comprehensive and continuous psychosocial support to people experiencing IPV. A multi-modular intervention that covers different topics and can be personalized to individual user needs could address the diversity of the target population. Providing guidance for the digital intervention is critical to spontaneously address individual needs. Further research is needed to evaluate the efficacy of an integrative digital self-help intervention and to explore its feasibility it in different settings and populations.

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  • 49.
    Myleus, Anna
    et al.
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Petersen, Solveig
    Umeå University, Sweden Umeå University, Sweden .
    Carlsson, Annelie
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Hammarroth, Solveig
    Norrtalje Hospital, Sweden .
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Ivarsson, Anneli
    Umeå University, Sweden .
    Health-related quality of life is not impaired in children with undetected as well as diagnosed celiac disease: a large population based cross-sectional study2014In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 14, no 425Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge regarding the health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of children with celiac disease remains limited and inconclusive. We investigated the HRQoL of three groups of 12-year-olds with: i) undetected celiac disease ii) clinically diagnosed celiac disease, and iii) without celiac disease. Methods: A school-based cross-sectional multicenter screening study invited 18 325 children, whereof 68% consented to participate. Participants provided a blood sample, which was later analyzed for anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies, and alongside filled in a questionnaire. When anti-tissue-tranglutaminase antibodies were elevated, a small intestinal biopsy verified the screening-detected celiac disease diagnosis. Self-reported HRQoL was measured using Kidscreen, a generic 52 items instrument with proven reliability and validity. Scores were linearly transformed into a 0-100 scale with higher values indicating better HRQoL. Mean values with standard deviations (mean +/- SD) were compared, and uni- and multivariate logistic regression models tested the odds of a low HRQoL among children with undetected or diagnosed celiac disease, respectively. Results: Children with undetected celiac disease (n = 238) reported similar HRQoL as children without celiac disease (n = 12 037) (83.0 +/- 11.0 vs. 82.5 +/- 11.3, P = 0.51), and also similar HRQoL (82.2 +/- 12.2, P = 0.28) to that of children with diagnosed celiac disease (n = 90), of whom 92% were adherent to treatment. Having undetected celiac disease did not increase the odds of low overall HRQoL, independent of sex, area of residence, study year and occurrence of gastrointestinal symptoms (adjusted odds ratio 0.77, 95% CI 0.54-1.10). Comparable results were seen for diagnosed celiac disease cases (adjusted odds ratio 1.11, 95% CI 0.67-1.85). Conclusion: Children with undetected celiac disease reported comparable HRQoL as their peers with diagnosed celiac disease, and those without celiac disease, when reporting prior to receiving the diagnosis through screening. Thus, children with celiac disease, both untreated and diagnosed, perceive their HRQoL as unimpaired by their disease.

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  • 50.
    Müssener, Ulrika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Marcus
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Database and information techniques. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mccambridge, James
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. University of York, England.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist in Motala.
    User satisfaction with the structure and content of the NEXit intervention, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme2016In: BMC Public Health, E-ISSN 1471-2458, Vol. 16, article id 1179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Smoking is still the leading cause of preventable ill health and death. There is a limited amount of evidence for effective smoking cessation interventions among young people. To address this, a text messaging-based smoking cessation programme, the NEXit intervention, was developed. Short-term effectiveness, measured immediately after the 12-week intervention revealed that 26% of smokers in the intervention group had prolonged abstinence compared with 15% in the control group. The present study was performed to explore the users experiences of the structure and content of the intervention in order to further develop the intervention. Methods: Students participating in the main NEXit randomized controlled trial were invited to grade their experiences of the structure and content of the intervention after having completed follow-up. The participants received an e-mail with an electronic link to a short questionnaire. Descriptive analysis of the distribution of the responses to the questionnaire was performed. Free-text comments to 14 questions were analysed. Results: The response rate for the user feedback questionnaire was 35% (n = 289/827) and 428 free-text comments were collected. The first motivational phase of the intervention was appreciated by 55% (158/289) of the participants. Most participants wanted to quit smoking immediately and only 124/289 (43%) agreed to have to decide a quit-date in the future. Most participants 199/289 (69%) found the content of the messages in the core programme to be very good or good, and the variability between content types was appreciated by 78% (224/289). Only 34% (97/289) of the participants thought that all or nearly all messages were valuable, and some mentioned that it was not really the content that mattered, but that the messages served as a reminder about the decision to quit smoking. Conclusions: The programme was largely perceived satisfactory in most aspects concerning structure and content by young people and most participants stated that they would recommend it to a friend who wants to quit smoking. The motivational phase might be worth shortening and the number of messages around the quit date itself reduced. Shorter messages seemed to be more acceptable.

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