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  • 1.
    Freese, Riita
    et al.
    Dept of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology Helsingfors Universitet, Finland.
    Vaarala, Outi
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Turpeinen, Anu
    Dept of Applied Chemistry and Microbiology Helsingfors Universitet, Finland.
    Mutanen, Marja
    Deptof Applied Chemistry and Microbiology Helsingfors Universitet, Finland.
    No difference in platelet activation or inflammation markers after diets rich or poor in vegetables, berries and apple in healthy subjects.2004In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 43, p. 175-182Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Svedlund, Anna
    et al.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Pettersson, Cecilia
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Tubic, Bojan
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Swolin-Eide, Diana
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Vitamin D status in young Swedish women with anorexia nervosa during intensive weight gain therapy2017In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 56, no 6, p. 2061-2067Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose Anorexia nervosa (AN) is associated with reduced bone mass and an increased fracture risk. The aim was to evaluate the vitamin D status and the association with body mass index (BMI), fat mass and bone mineral density (BMD) in patients with severe AN during a prospective intervention study of intensive nutrition therapy. Methods This study comprised 25 Swedish female AN patients (20.1 +/- 2.3 years), who were treated as inpatients for 12 weeks with a high-energy diet. Serum 25-hydroxy-vitamin D (25(OH) D), calcium, phosphate and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were measured. BMD and body composition were assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry at study start and after 12 weeks. Results Twenty-two patients completed the study. The mean weight gain was 9.9 kg and BMI (mean +/- SD) increased from 15.5 +/- 0.9 to 19.0 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2), P amp;lt; 0.0001. Fat mass increased from median 12 to 27 %. The median serum 25(OH) D level was 84 nmol/L at baseline, which decreased to 76 nmol/L, P amp;lt; 0.05. PTH increased from median 21.9 to 30.0 ng/L, P amp;lt; 0.0001. BMC increased during the study period, P amp;lt; 0.001. Conclusions Serum 25(OH) D levels were adequate both at study start and completion, however, nominally decreased after the 12-week nutritional intervention. PTH increased subsequently, which coincide with the decreased 25(OH) D levels. The reduction in 25(OH) D could be due to an increased storage of vitamin D related to the increase in fat mass since vitamin D is sequestered in adipose tissue.

  • 3.
    Toss, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Is a daily supplementation with 40 microgram vitamin D(3) sufficient? A randomised controlled trial2012In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 51, no 8, p. 939-945Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose  The effect of 40 μg (1,600 IU) per day of vitamin D3 on serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) and markers of bone and mineral metabolism was evaluated. Methods  This intervention study was designed as a double-blind randomised controlled trial. Forty-five community-dwelling subjects (32 females), age 55–84 years, at 58° North latitude were supplemented for 1 year with 40 μg vitamin D3 plus 1,000 mg calcium per day, or with 1,000 mg calcium per day for controls. Safety parameters and 25(OH)D, intact parathyroid hormone (PTH), ionized calcium, bone-specific alkaline phosphatase (BALP), and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase isoform 5b (TRACP5b) were measured over the study period. Results  All subjects supplemented with vitamin D3 reached a 25(OH)D level above 50 nmol/L. Mean (SD) serum 25(OH)D increased from 50.4 (13.5) nmol/L to 84.2 (17.5) nmol/L, range 55.0–125.0 nmol/L in the vitamin D3 supplemented group and the corresponding levels for the control group were 47.3 (14.1) nmol/L and 45.7 (13.4) nmol/L, range 26.0–73.0 nmol/L. No serious adverse event was recorded and the highest 25(OH)D level reached, 125.0 nmol/L, is well below toxic levels. BALP and TRACP5b did not change significantly over the study period. Conclusions  This trial suggests that a daily supplementation with 40 μg vitamin D3 is sufficient to secure a 25(OH)D level of 50 nmol/L. No side effects were observed in the study group.

  • 4.
    Toss, Göran
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Magnusson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Vitamin D status: sunshine is nice but other factors prevail2012In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 51, no 2, p. 255-256Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Warstedt, Kristina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Duchén, Karel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Increased linoleic acid/alpha-linolenic acid ratio in Swedish cord blood samples collected between 1985 and 20052013In: European Journal of Nutrition, ISSN 1436-6207, E-ISSN 1436-6215, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 659-665Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cord serum (CS) phospholipid fatty acid composition is associated with maternal diet during foetal life, and maternal intake of linoleic acid (LA, C18:2 omega-6) and alpha-linolenic acid (LNA, C18:3 omega-3) has been shown to influence the LA and LNA levels in CS. A possible connection between the increased incidence of atopic diseases and increased intake of LA and decreased intake of LNA in the Western world has been proposed. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe aim of this study was to explore phospholipid fatty acid proportions and total IgE levels in CS from Swedish children, collected from 1985 to 2005, a period with increasing frequency of allergic diseases in Sweden, and reveal possible changes over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanPhospholipid fatty acids and total IgE antibodies were analysed with gas chromatography and UniCAP(A (R)) technology, respectively, in 300 CS samples. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe proportions of LA and LNA decreased significantly from 1985 to 2005 (p andlt; 0.001 for both). However, the LA/LNA ratio did increase (p andlt; 0.001), revealing a relatively larger decrease in LNA than in LA. No correlations were found between omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids and total IgE antibodies in CS from newborn children. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe LA/LNA ratio increased (p andlt; 0.001) in cord serum samples collected between 1985 and 2005, and no correlations between fatty acids and total IgE were found.

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