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  • 1.
    Albin, Björn
    et al.
    School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Hjelm, Katarina
    Department of Community Medicine, University of Lund and School of Health Sciences and Social Work, Växjö University, Sweden .
    Ekberg, Jan
    School of Management and Economics, Växjö University, Sweden.
    Elmståhl, Sölve
    Department of Community Medicine, Division of Geriatric Medicine, University of Lund, Sweden.
    Mortality among 723,948 foreign- and native-born Swedes 1970-19992005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 511-517Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Mortality in a population is regarded as an accurate and valid measure of the population's health. There are a few international studies, predominantly cross-sectional, of mortality among all foreign-born compared with an indigenous population, and the results have varied. No Swedish longitudinal study describing and analysing mortality data was found in a literature review.

    METHODS: This study describes and analyses the differences in mortality between foreign-born persons and native Swedes during the period 1970-1999, based on data from Statistics Sweden and the National Board of Health and Welfare. The database consisted of 723,948 persons, 361 974 foreign-born living in Sweden in 1970, aged > or = 16 years, and 361 974 Swedish controls matched for age, sex, occupation and type of employment, living in the same county in 1970.

    RESULTS: The results showed increased mortality for foreign-born persons compared with the Swedish controls [odds ratio (OR) 1.08; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.07-1.08]. Persons who had migrated 'late' (1941-1970) to Sweden were 2.5 years younger at time of death than controls. In relation to country of birth, the highest risk odds were for men born in Finland (OR 1.21), Denmark (OR 1.11) and Norway/Iceland (OR 1.074). Age cohorts of foreign-born persons born between 1901 and 1920 had higher mortality at age 55-69 years than cohorts born between 1921 and 1944.

    CONCLUSIONS: Migrants had higher mortality than the native population, and migration may be a risk factor for health; therefore, this seems to be an important factor to consider when studying mortality and health.

  • 2.
    Bien, Barbara
    et al.
    Medical University of Bialystok, Poland .
    McKee, Kevin J
    Dalarna University, Sweden .
    Doehner, Hanneli
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany .
    Triantafillou, Judith
    50Plus Hellas Athens, Greece .
    Lamura, Giovanni
    INRCA Ancona, Italy .
    Doroszkiewicz, Halina
    Medical University of Bialystok, Poland .
    Krevers, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kofahl, Christopher
    University of Medical Centre Hamburg Eppendorf, Germany .
    Disabled older peoples use of health and social care services and their unmet care needs in six European countries2013In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 6, p. 1032-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The national health and social care systems in Europe remain poorly integrated with regard to the care needs of older persons. The present study examined the range of health and social care services used by older people and their unmet care needs, across six European countries. Methods: Family carers of older people were recruited in six countries via a standard protocol. Those providing care for disabled older people (n = 2629) provided data on the older persons service use over a 6-month period, and their current unmet care needs. An inventory of 21 services common to all six countries was developed. Analyses considered the relationship between older peoples service use and unmet care needs across countries. Results: Older people in Greece, Italy and Poland used mostly health-oriented services, used fewer services overall and also demonstrated a higher level of unmet care needs when compared with the other countries. Older people in the United Kingdom, Germany and Sweden used a more balanced profile of socio-medical services. A negative relationship was found between the number of different services used and the number of different areas of unmet care needs across countries. Conclusions: Unmet care needs in older people are particularly high in European countries where social service use is low, and where there is a lack of balance in the use of health and social care services. An expansion of social care services in these countries might be the most effective strategy for reducing unmet needs in disabled older people.

  • 3.
    Borgquist, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Arrelöv, BE
    jSvärdsudd, Kurt
    Uppsala universitet.
    Influence of local structural factors on physicians' sick-listing practice: A population-based study2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 470-474Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Physicians have a central role as gatekeepers to the social security system, including sick-listing. Variation in physicians' sick-listing practices has been demonstrated in several studies. The objective of this study was to determine whether local structural factors affect sick-listing practice. Methods: A total of 57 563 consecutive sick-listing certificates, issued during 4 months in 1995 and 2 months in 1996, were collected from the local branches of the National Social Insurance Office in eight Swedish counties. County code, local community population size and presence of a hospital in the area were used as indicators of local structural factors. Length of the sick-listing certificates and of the sick-listing episodes were used as outcome variables. Results: After ajustment for the influence of category of issuing physician, patients' age, sex and diagnosis ('case mix'), and type of certificate there was a large variation of the length of the sick-listing certificates and of the sick-listing episodes between counties, between communities of various size and between communities with or without a hospital in the area. All these factors were independently and significantly correlated to the length of the certificate and of the sick-listing episode. Conclusions: The results support the hypothesis that physicians' sick-listing practice is influenced by local structural factors. © The Author 2005. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Garpenby, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics.
    From ideology to reality: mental health care in Sweden.1993In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 3, p. 296-298Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Hjern, Anders
    et al.
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Rajmil, Luis
    Catalan Agency Health Informat Assessment and Qual, Spain .
    Bergstrom, Malin
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Berlin, Marie
    National Board Health and Welf, Sweden .
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Social and Affective Neuroscience (CSAN).
    Modin, Bitte
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Migrant density and well-being-A national school survey of 15-year-olds in Sweden2013In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 823-828Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of migrant density in school on the well-being of pupils with a migrant origin in first as well as second generation. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of data from a national classroom survey of 15-year-old Swedish schoolchildren. The study population included 76 229 pupils (86.5% participation) with complete data set from 1352 schools. Six dimensions of well-being from the KIDSCREEN were analysed in two-level linear regression models to assess the influence of migrant origin at individual level and percentage of students with a migrant origin at school level, as well as interaction terms between them. Z-scores were used to equalize scales. Results: A high density (andgt; 50%) of pupils with a migrant origin in first or second generation was associated with positive well-being on all six scales for foreign-born pupils originating in Africa or Asia compared with schools with low (andlt; 10%) migrant density. The effect sizes were 0.56 for boys and 0.29 for girls on the comprehensive KIDSCREEN 10-index (P andlt; 0.001) and 0.61 and 0.34, respectively, for psychological well-being (P andlt; 0.001). Of the boys and girls born in Africa or Asia, 31.6% and 34.6%, respectively, reported being bullied during the past week in schools with low (andlt; 10%) migrant density. Conclusions: Pupils born in Africa or Asia are at high risk for being bullied and having impaired well-being in schools with few other migrant children. School interventions to improve peer relations and prevent bullying are needed to promote well-being in non-European migrant children.

  • 6.
    Hultin, Hanna
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Johansson, Gun
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindholm, Christina
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundberg, Ingvar
    Akademiska Sjukhuset.
    Möller, Jette
    Karolinska Institutet.
    Low level of adjustment latitude--a risk factor for sickness absence2010In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 682-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The prerequisite for obtaining sickness benefit is reduced work ability for medical reasons in combination with work demands which cannot be adjusted accordingly. The aim of this study was to investigate if low levels of adjustment latitude, defined as the possibility to temporarily adjust work demands in case of ill health, influence sickness absence.

    METHODS: A prospective cohort study of 1420 employees (47% participation, aged 19-68; 56% women) was conducted at six Swedish workplaces. Exposure to two general and nine specific types of adjustment latitude was ascertained at baseline. Outcome was defined as the first new employer-reported sick-leave spell during a follow-up of 3-12 months. Hazard ratios (HR) of sick leave, with 95% confidence intervals (CI), were estimated by Cox proportional hazards regression.

    RESULTS: The incidence of sickness absence was 2.85/1000 person-days. The self-reported reasons for sick leave were mainly minor complaints such as colds, influenzas and headaches. Employees lacking adjustment latitude had an adjusted HR of sickness absence of 1.51 (95% CI 1.08-2.11). Among specific adjustment latitude types, those not having the possibility to work from home generated an HR of 1.86 (95% CI 1.31-2.64). The effects of lack of adjustment latitude were similar for men and women but seemed to vary between different occupations.

    CONCLUSION: A low level of adjustment latitude at work is a risk factor for sickness absence.

  • 7.
    Johansson, Kjell
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Advice to patients in Swedish primary care regarding alcohol and other lifestyle habits: how patients report the actions of GPs in relation to their own expectations and satisfaction with the consultation2005In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 615-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Lifestyle advice given by general practitioners (GPs) may be a cost-effective means of health promotion; however, it is not fully put into routine practice. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent GPs' patients expect and receive advice concerning alcohol, tobacco, exercise and diet in relation to sociodemographic characteristics, type of visit and patient satisfaction.

    Methods: A postal questionnaire was sent to a representative sample (n = 9750) of patients who had consulted GPs in a county in Sweden. The response rate was 69% (n = 6734).

    Results: Exercise was the most (16%) and alcohol the least (5%) common type of advice. The patients received advice more often than they expected in all areas except alcohol. The patients reported the highest rate of unfulfilled advice expectation and the lowest rate of unexpected advice in the case of alcohol. Male gender, poorer self-rated health and scheduled appointment were independent predictors of all types of advice. Continuity of GP contact was only favourable for exercise and diet advice. The patients who received advice were more satisfied with their visit to the doctor.

    Conclusions: A tertiary preventive perspective guides GPs' practice of giving advice. Male patients with advanced illnesses are given priority. Women and patients with long-term risk habits are more neglected. The GPs tend to misjudge the expectations and needs of their patients and are too restrained in their counselling practice. Alcohol is the most disregarded area of advice in proportion to the patients' expectations and needs.

  • 8.
    Karlsson, Nadine
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Carstensen, John
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health and Society.
    Gjesdal, Sturla
    Socialmedicin Bergen Norge.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Risk factors for disability pension in a population-based cohort of men and women on long-term sick leave in Sweden2008In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 224-231Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Knowledge on predictors of disability pension is very limited. The aim was to assess the importance of sick-leave diagnosis and socio-demographic variables as risk factors for disability pension among individuals on long-term sickness absence and to compare these factors by gender and over time. Methods: A prospective population-based cohort study in Östergötland County, Sweden, included 19 379 individuals who, in 1985-87, were aged 16-60 years and had a new spell of long-term sickness absence lasting <56 days. Follow-up was done in two time frames: 0-5 and 6-10 years after inclusion. The risk of disability pension in relation to sick-leave diagnosis and socio-demographic factors was assessed by Cox proportional hazard regression analysis. Results: In 5 years, after inclusion, 28% of the cohort had been granted disability pension. Those with higher age, low income, previous sick leave, no employment and non-Swedish origin had higher risk of disability pension, while those with young children had lower risk. Considering the inclusion diagnosis, the pattern differed between men and women (P < 0.001). Among men, those with mental disorders had the highest risk and among women those with musculoskeletal disorders. Except for income, the effect of which was reversed over time, the overall pattern of disability pension predictors remained 6-10 years after inclusion but was attenuated. Conclusion: Besides socio-demographic risk factors, the sick-leave diagnoses constitute an important both medium and long-term predictor of disability pension among both men and women on long-term sickness absence. © 2008. The Author(s).

  • 9.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    Rethinking health promotion: a global approach.2001In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 11, no 3, p. 354-354Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 10.
    Lesen, Eva
    et al.
    Nordic School Public Heatlh, Sweden Nordic Health Econ AB, Sweden .
    Andersson Sundell, Karolina
    Nordic School Public Heatlh, Sweden University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Carlsten, Anders
    Medical Prod Agency, Sweden .
    Mardby, Ann-Charlotte
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden .
    Jönsson, Anna K.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pharmacology.
    Is the level of patient co-payment for medicines associated with refill adherence in Sweden?2014In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 24, no 1, p. 85-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the Swedish reimbursement scheme, the co-payment is based on the price of the product and decreases in a stepwise manner as the total accumulated co-payment increases. The aim of this study was to analyse how refill adherence in Sweden varies according to patients co-payment level for medicines, with antiepileptic drug (AED) use as an example. Methods: Prevalent AED users aged 18-85 years who purchased an AED between 1 January and 30 June 2007 were identified in the Swedish Prescribed Drug Register and followed for a maximum of 2 years. Patient time was categorized based on patients accumulated co-payment for all drugs per reimbursement period. The continuous measure of medication acquisition (CMA) was used to estimate refill adherence in relation to the patients co-payment level. Associations between patients co-payment for all medicines and refill adherence were assessed with multilevel mixed-effects linear regression, accounting for clustering within patients. Results: The study population included 2210 patients (mean age: 56 years; 54% men). CMA for AED was 91% for patients where the co-payment corresponded to 100% of the price. Compared with these patients, refill adherence for AED was 2-4% higher (P less than 0.001) for patients with reduced co-payment (co-payment of 50% of the price). Higher age, higher income and fenytoin use were also associated with a higher refill adherence for AED. Conclusions: Using AED as an example, a higher level of reimbursement was associated with a higher refill adherence compared with full co-payment in Sweden.

  • 11. Lundberg, L
    et al.
    Johannesson, M
    Isacsson, D
    Borgquist, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, General Practice.
    Health-state utilities in a general population in relation to age, gender and socioeconomic factors.1999In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 9, p. 211-217Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Mulinari, Shai
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Bredström, Anna
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Merlo, Juan
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Questioning the discriminatory accuracy of broad migrant categories in public health: self-rated health in Sweden2015In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 911-917Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Differences between natives and migrants in average risk for poor self-rated health (SRH) are well documented, which has lent support to proposals for interventions targeting disadvantaged minority groups. However, such proposals are based on measures of association that neglect individual heterogeneity around group averages and thereby the discriminatory accuracy (DA) of the categories used (i.e. their ability to discriminate the individuals with poor and good SRH, respectively). Therefore, applying DA measures rather than only measures of association our study revisits the value of broad native and migrant categorizations for predicting SRH. Design, setting and participants: We analyzed 27 723 individuals aged 18-80 who responded to a 2008 Swedish public health survey. We performed logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios (ORs), predicted risks and the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AU-ROC) as a measure of epidemiological DA. Results: Being born abroad was associated with higher odds of poor SRH (OR = 1.75), but the AU-ROC of this variable only added 0.02 units to the AU-ROC for age alone (from 0.53 to 0.55). The AU-ROC increased, but remained unsatisfactorily low (0.62), when available social and demographic variables were included. Conclusions: Our results question the use of broad native/migrant categorizations as instruments for forecasting individual SRH. Such simple categorizations have a very low DA and should be abandoned in public health practice. Measures of association and DA should be reported together whenever an intervention is being considered, especially in the area of ethnicity, migration and health.

  • 13.
    Palm, Anna
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Sundsvall Hospital, Sweden.
    Danielsson, Ingela
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Skalkidou, Alkistis
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Olofsson, Niclas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine.
    Högberg, Ulf
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Violence victimisation-a watershed for young womens mental and physical health2016In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 26, no 5, p. 861-867Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: The association between victimisation and adverse health in children is well established but few studies have addressed the effect of victimisation, especially multiple victimisations, in older adolescents and young adults. The aim of this study was to assess self-reported health in young women (15-22 years) victimised to one or more types of violence, compared with non-victimised.aEuro integral Methods: Young women visiting youth health centres in Sweden answered a questionnaire constructed from standardised instruments addressing violence victimisation (emotional, physical, sexual and family violence), socio-demographics, substance use and physical and mental health. Adjusted odds ratio (AOR) with 95% confidence interval (CI) and attributable risk (AR) were assessed.aEuro integral Results: Of 1051 women (73% of eligible women), 25% were lifetime victims of one type of violence and 31% of two or more types of violence. Sexual-minority young women were more victimised than heterosexual women. Violence victimisation increased the risk for adverse health outcomes, especially evident for those multiply victimised. Victims of two or more types of violence had AOR 11.8 (CI 6.9-20.1) for post-traumatic stress symptoms, 6.3 (CI 3.9-10.2) for anxiety symptoms and 10.8 (CI 5.2-22.5) for suicide ideation. The AR of victimisation accounted for 41% of post-traumatic stress symptoms, 30% of anxiety symptoms and 27% of suicide ideation. Stratified analyses showed that lower economic resources did not influence health negatively for non-victimised, whereas it multiplicatively reinforced ill-health when combined with violence victimisation.aEuro integral Conclusion: Violence victimisation, and particularly multiple victimisations, was strongly associated with mental ill-health in young women, especially evident in those with low economic resources.

  • 14.
    Swahnberg, I.M. Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wijma, Barbro
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire (NorAQ): validation of new measures of emotional, physical, and sexual abuse, and abuse in the health care system among women2003In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: In the literature about abuse, large variations in prevalence rates exist. Validated research instruments are scarce and are needed urgently. Our aim was to validate the 13 questions concerning the experiences of abuse among women in the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire against an interview and two validated questionnaires.

    Method: Data collection was in two parts. i) The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire was sent to a random sample of 2000 women in Östergötland. ii) A subsample of 64 women was interviewed, and filled in the Conflict Tactic Scale, the Sexual Abuse Questionnaire, and the NorVold Abuse Questionnaire for a second time. The interview had open questions about abuse and was considered our gold standard.

    Results: The response rate was 61%. The abuse variables in The NorVold Abuse Questionnaire showed good test–retest reliability (84–95%). Specificity was 98% for all kinds of abuse except physical (85%). Sensitivity ranged from 75% (emotional) to 96% (physical). The likelihood ratio ranged from 38 to 43 for all kinds of abuse except physical (likelihood ratio 6). NorAQ performed better against the interview than against the Sexual Abuse Questionnaire and equally against the Conflict Tactic Scale. High lifetime prevalence rates of abuse were found: emotional 21.4%; physical 36.4%; sexual 16.9%; abuse in the health care 15.6%. Prevalence rates of abuse dropped considerably when a criterion of current suffering was added.

    Conclusions: The abuse variables in NorAQ have good reliability and validity.

  • 15.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Björmsjo, Maria
    Boys soccer league injuries: A community-based study of time-loss from sports participation and long-term sequelae2008In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 18, no 1, p. 19-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Youth soccer is important for keeping European children physically active. The aim of this study is to examine injuries sustained in a community soccer league for boys with regard to age-related incidence, time lost from participation and long-term sequelae. Methods: Primary injury data was collected from a soccer league including 1800 players, comprising approximately 25% of all boys 13-16 years of age in three Swedish municipalities (population 150 000). Injuries were primarily identified based on a time loss definition of sports injury. At the end of the season, a physician interviewed every player who reported injured to determine whether there were any remaining sequelae. If a sequela was confirmed, the physician repeated the interview 6, 18 and 48 months after the end of the season. Results: Forty-four injuries were recorded during 18 720 player game hours (2.4 injuries per 1000 player game hours). The highest injury incidence (6.8 injuries per 1000 player game hours) was recorded in the first-year elite divisions. Thirty-two injuries (73%) were categorized as moderate-severe, and 21 injuries (48%) required medical attention. Eight injuries caused sequelae that remained 6 months after the end of the season, and 3 injuries caused sequelae that lasted 4 years after the injury event. Conclusion: An overall low injury rate makes soccer a suitable sport for inclusion in programmes that promote physical activity among children. When organizing soccer leagues for boys, injury prevention programmes should be provided to adolescent players when they begin playing in competitive divisions. © The Author 2007. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  • 16.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Schyllander, Jan
    Swedish Civil Contingencies Agcy, Sweden.
    Ekman, Diana Stark
    Walden Univ, MN USA; Univ Skovde, Sweden.
    Ekman, Robert
    Chalmers Univ Technol, Sweden.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kristensson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Community-level football injury epidemiology: traumatic injuries treated at Swedish emergency medical facilities2018In: European Journal of Public Health, ISSN 1101-1262, E-ISSN 1464-360X, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 94-99Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite the popularity of the sport, few studies have investigated community-level football injury patterns. This study examines football injuries treated at emergency medical facilities using data from three Swedish counties. An open-cohort design was used based on residents aged 0-59 years in three Swedish counties (pop. 645 520). Data were collected from emergency medical facilities in the study counties between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2010. Injury frequencies and proportions for age groups stratified by sex were calculated with 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs) and displayed per diagnostic group and body location. Each year, more than 1/200 person aged 0-59 years sustained at least one injury during football play that required emergency medical care. The highest injury incidence was observed among adolescent boys [2009 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1914-2108)] and adolescent girls [1413 injuries per 100 000 population years (95% CI 1333-1498)]. For female adolescents and adults, knee joint/ligament injury was the outstanding injury type (20% in ages 13-17 years and 34% in ages 18-29 years). For children aged 7-12 years, more than half of the treated injuries involved the upper extremity; fractures constituted about one-third of these injuries. One of every 200 residents aged 0-59 years in typical Swedish counties each year sustained a traumatic football injury that required treatment in emergency healthcare. Further research on community-level patterns of overuse syndromes sustained by participation in football play is warranted.

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