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  • 1.
    Adelswärd, Viveka
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    Sachs, L.
    Sachs, L..
    The messenger's dilemmas - Giving and getting information in genealogical mapping for hereditary cancer2003In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 125-138Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent advances in genetic research can provide constructive preventive possibilities for individuals and society but also provide physicians and laypersons with new problems. For instance, in consultations dealing with the risk of getting hereditary cancer, physicians have to balance between the role of clinician, attending to the needs of a certain individual, and the role of researcher, collecting vital data for important research. Individuals taking part in these consultations not only have to interpret the information provided by the physicians. They might also be faced with the problem of informing others, often close kin, in a similar risk situation, or on the physician's behalf obtain information from them. They do not only receive bad news about themselves but are placed in a messenger's dilemma. The study is based on discourse data from 31 audio-taped talks between a physician and a person seeking information. Analyses of the consultations reveal how individuals seeking information about possible future diseases find themselves in a position where not only informing unknowing relatives, but also obtaining information from them, is experienced as giving them bad news.

  • 2.
    Berner, Boel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Understanding 'the contaminated blood affair': Lessons from cross-national comparisons2007In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 105-112Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This extended review critically compares two edited texts which explore institutional and societal responses to the health risks posed by the presence of HIV infection in blood used for medical purposes. The review is used to raise more general issues about cross-national comparisons and regulatory responses to new risks. The texts reviewed are Bovens, 't Hart and Peters (2001) Success and Failure in Public Governance. A Comparative Analysis and Feldman and Bayer (1999) Blood Feuds. AIDS, Blood and the Politics of Medical Disaster. The review draws a number of conclusions from analysis and comparison of these texts. First, ingrained assumptions (in this case, that transfused blood from unpaid donors is inherently safe) may impede responsiveness to new risks. Second, national political responses to adverse events (in this case HIV infection through medical use of blood products) are not directly related to the adequacy of the regulatory response. Third, the two texts come to somewhat different conclusions about the adequacy of the regulatory response to the contaminated blood crisis. This discrepancy is explained in terms of differences in approach to cross-national comparison.

  • 3.
    Hoffmann, Mikael
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lindh-Åstrand, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, Institute of Nursing, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Risk talk: rhetorical strategies in consultations on hormone replacement therap2005In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 5, no 2, p. 139-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    When analysing risk discussions in medical settings it is important to consider the specific activity type. In this qualitative study 20 first-time consultations by healthy women regarding hormone replacement therapy (HRT) in the menopause the risk discussion is asymmetrical with the doctors dominating. Despite being set up as a specific opportunity for women in the menopause to discuss problems and risks, it comes forth as a decision-making activity in a traditional medical setting. The consultations fulfil to a high extent the demands for informed decision making, but the risk discussions are recontextualised into a cost-benefit discourse with a typical implicit quantitative bias. The doctors use several different rhetorical strategies such as positive introduction of HRT, embedding drawbacks in positive introductions and/or exits thereby diminishing them. The word risk is avoided to a considerable extent and the term 'drawbacks' is used instead. The most obvious strategy is to move from the woman's symptoms to aspects of prevention, thus changing the discussion from the menopause and different strategies to cope with menopausal problems into a medically oriented discussion of pharmacological treatment alternatives. The 'change of life' in these talks is entirely conceptualised within a 'medical model'.

  • 4.
    Honkasalo, M.-M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enduring as a mode of living with uncertainty2008In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 10, no 5, p. 491-503Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In addition to management and control, which in risk research have been studied extensively, there is a diversity and heterogeneity in people's responses to uncertainty that has mostly remained hidden. The aim of my article is to discuss some of the variation in people's ways of 'living with uncertainty,' an expression that is widely applied among many anthropologists and sociologists dealing with research into issues of risk and chronic illness. My intent is to open up and theorise the expression further with the argument that 'living' consists in a variety of actions and practices. I want to attend not only to the different empirical meanings of action and agency as they emerge within the activities of modern everyday life, but also to attend to the kinds of analytical questions that are opened up when action is analysed in its wide variety of modalities, as control, resistance, embracing, and enduring. What then does it mean to endure? According to the ethnographic results, enduring is constituted occasionally just in dwelling, or lingering, or embedded deeply within the everyday. What is created in these processes is ethical agency. The vocabulary of agency that the social sciences have in circulation, however, does not grasp this kind of agency to its fullest extent. This article thus is aimed at contributing to discussions on the relations between the uncertainty of the lived-everyday, which has been brought about by illness, and the varieties of human action by emphasising the potentialities and possibilities this agency has to offer.

  • 5.
    Iversen, Clara
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Broström, Anders
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology. School of Health and Welfare, Jönköping University, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Ulander, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Clinical Neurophysiology.
    Traffic risk work with sleepy patients: from rationality to practice2018In: Health, Risk and Society, ISSN 1369-8575, E-ISSN 1469-8331, Vol. 20, no 1-2, p. 23-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, we aim to contribute to the emerging field of risk-work studies by examining the relationship between risk rationality and risk practices in nurses conversations with Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients about traffic risks. Legislation in Sweden towards traffic risk involves clinicians making risk assessment of patients prone to falling asleep while driving. In contrast to an overall care rationale, this means that the health of the patient is not the only risk object in treatment consultations. However, guidelines on how to implement legislation are missing. To examine the practical reality of nurses traffic-risk work, we draw on an analysis of data from a Swedish study in 2015. This study included qualitative interviews with specialist nurses and video-recorded interactions between nurses and Obstructive Sleep Apnoea patients. We found that a lack of clarity in traffic-risk guidelines on how risk should be addressed was evident in both interview accounts and in observed practice. While nurses primarily accounted for risk work as treatment-relevant education, they practised risk work as interrogation. Patients also treated nurses inquiries as assessment - not education - by responding defensively. We conclude that while confusing risk work and treatment enables clinicians to treat patients as competent actors, it obscures the controlling aspects of traffic-risk questions for individual patients and downplays the implications of drowsy driving for general traffic safety.

1 - 5 of 5
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