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  • 1.
    Alehagen, Siw
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägg, Monica
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kalén-Enterlöv, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of community health nurses regarding father participation in child health care2011In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 153-162Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Traditionally child health care (CHC) has been an arena where mothers and nurses meet, but in recent years fathers are entering CHC with increasing frequency. The aim of this study was to describe nurses’ experiences of fathers’ participation in CHC. Nine Swedish nurses working in CHC were interviewed and asked to give a description of their experiences from meetings with fathers in CHC. Phenomenology according to Giorgi was used for the analysis and the essence of the findings was that father participation was seen from the perspective of mother participation and was constantly compared to mother participation in CHC. The essence is explicated in the following themes: participation through activities; equal participation although diverse; influence of structures in society; and strengthening participation. Clinical implications include the need for creating a separate identity in CHC for fathers and more communication directed at fathers.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Noomi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, AnnaKarin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hermansson, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Andersson-Gäre, Boel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Parents' attitudes to smoking and passive smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in child health care2011In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 272-286Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to describe parents' attitudes to smoking and their experience of the tobacco preventive work in antenatal care and in Child Health Care (CHC) in Sweden. A population based survey in which 62 percent of 3000 randomly selected parents with 1- and 3-year-old children answered a questionnaire. Fifty-six percent stated that smoking was registered in the health record of the child yet no further discussion regarding passive smoking took place. The parents' educational level and smoking status was related to the attitudes and experiences of the tobacco preventive work. The results indicated that the dialogue with parents regarding children and environmental tobacco smoke (ETS) exposure has to be redesigned and intensified in order to meet the needs of parents with different backgrounds.

  • 3.
    Forslund Frykedal, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education, Teaching and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences.
    Rosander, Michael
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Barimani, Mia
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Berlin, Anita
    Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Leaders limitations and approaches to creating conditions for interaction and communication in parental groups: A qualitative study2019In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 23, no 1, p. 147-159Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and understand parental group (PG) leaders experiences of creating conditions for interaction and communication. The data consisted of 10 interviews with 14 leaders. The transcribed interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. The results showed that the leaders ambition was to create a parent-centred learning environment by establishing conditions for interaction and communication between the parents in the PGs. However, the leaders experience was that their professional competencies were insufficient and that they lacked pedagogical tools to create constructive group discussions. Nevertheless, they found other ways to facilitate interactive processes. Based on their experience in the PG, the leaders constructed informal socio-emotional roles for themselves (e.g. caring role and personal role) and let their more formal task roles (e.g. professional role, group leader and consulting role) recede into the background, so as to remove the imbalance of power between the leaders and the parents. They believed this would make the parents feel more confident and make it easier for them to start communicating and interacting. This personal approach places them in a vulnerable position in the PG, in which it is easy for them to feel offended by parents criticism, questioning or silence.

  • 4.
    Forsner, M.
    et al.
    Dalarna University, Sweden.
    Nilsson, S.
    University of Borås, Sweden; University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Finnstrom, B.
    University of West, Sweden.
    Mörelius, Evalotte
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Expectation prior to human papilloma virus vaccination: 11 to 12-Year-old girls written narratives2016In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 365-373Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Expectations prior to needle-related procedures can influence individuals decision making and compliance with immunization programmes. To protect from human papilloma virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the immunization needs to be given before sexual debut raising interest for this studys aim to investigate how 11 to 12-year-old girls narrate about their expectations prior to HPV vaccination. A total of 27 girls aged 11 to 12 years participated in this qualitative narrative study by writing short narratives describing their expectations. The requirement for inclusion was to have accepted HPV vaccination. Data were subjected to qualitative content analysis. Findings showed the following expectations: going to hurt, going to be scared and going to turn out fine. The expectations were based on the girls previous experiences, knowledge and self-image. The latent content revealed that the girls tried to transform uneasiness to confidence. The conclusion drawn from this study is that most girls of this age seem confident about their ability to cope with possible unpleasantness related to vaccinations. However, nurses need to find strategies to help those children who feel uneasy about needle-related procedures.

  • 5.
    Idvall, Ewa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Holm, Charlotta
    Västervik.
    Runesson, Ingrid
    Kalmar.
    Pain experiences and non-pharmacological strategies for pain management after tonsillectomy: a qualitative interview study of children and parents.2005In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 9, no 3, p. 196-207Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most common paediatric surgical procedures. This study aimed to investigate children's experience of pain and the nonpharmacological strategies that they used to manage pain after tonsillectomy. A further aim was to investigate parental views on these same phenomena. Six children (aged seven to 18 years) and their parents (four mothers and two fathers) were interviewed separately on the day after tonsillectomy. The data were analysed using a qualitative approach. Pain experiences were divided into the categories of physiological pain and psychological pain. Children rated their 'worst pain' during the past 24 hours between 6 and 10 (visual analogue scale, 0-10). The non-pharmacological strategies used most frequently to manage pain were thermal regulation (physical method) and distraction (cognitive-behavioural method) according to the framework used. Specific non-pharmacological strategies for pain management relative to different surgical procedures need to be considered.

  • 6.
    Nilsson, Stefan
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lindholm Olinder, Anna
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Forsner, Maria
    Dalarna University, Sweden; Umeå University, Sweden.
    The Faces Emotional Coping Scale as a self-reporting instrument for coping with needle-related procedures: An initial validation study with children treated for type 1 diabetes2017In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 392-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to determine the concurrent and content validity, sensitivity and inter-rater reliability of the Faces Emotional Coping Scale (FECS) to evaluate the childrens anticipation of the level of emotional coping in conjunction with a venepuncture. A total of 153 children with type 1 diabetes and 86 of their parents participated in the study. The age of the children, 76 of whom were boys, ranged from 7 to 18 years. The child and his or her parent reported the childs coping ability, and the child reported the pain intensity and unpleasantness of a venepuncture. The child also wrote a short narrative about his or her experience of the needle procedure. The FECS correlated negatively with the Coloured Analogue Scale and the Facial Affective Scale and positively with the FECS by proxy. The narratives of 90 children correlated negatively with the FECS. Younger children reported significantly lower scores than older children did regarding their ability to cope with a venepuncture. The childrens scores on the FECS showed good agreement with the parents scores. In this study, the FECS was deemed valid for measuring childrens ability to cope with their emotions when undergoing needle-related procedures like venepuncture.

  • 7.
    Petersson, Christina
    et al.
    Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Huus, Karina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hanberger, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Akesson, Karin
    Ryhov Hospital Jonköping, Sweden.
    Use of the national quality registry to monitor health-related quality of life of children with type I diabetes: A pilot study2015In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 30-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The management of diabetes is complicated, as treatment affects the everyday life of both children and their families. To enable optimal care for children with type I diabetes, it is important to highlight health-related quality of life (HrQoL) as well as medical outcomes to detect psychological problems that otherwise could be missed. The aim was to study HrQoL in children and adolescents with type I diabetes dependent on gender, age and co-morbidity and to study the consistency between childrens self-reporting and parents proxy reporting. The cross-sectional data were collected using the questionnaire DISABKIDS Chronic Generic Measure and the DISABKIDS diabetes module. Parents in the proxy report perceived their childrens HrQoL to be lower than children themselves. Boys reported their HrQoL to be better than girls. Results show that living with an additional disease has an impact on the HrQoL, which is an important factor to consider in the quality registry. Assessing HrQoL on a routine basis may facilitate detection and discussion of HrQoL-related questions in the national quality registry.

  • 8.
    Proczkowska-Björklund, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gustafsson, Per A.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Svedin, Carl Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Children's play after anaesthesia and surgery: background factors and associations to behaviour during anaesthetic induction2010In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 170-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children can experience anaesthetic induction as fearful and frightening and this can lead to postoperative behaviour changes and symptoms of high anxiety. A fearful experience can also lead to avoidant reactions due to raised negative emotions in situations similar to that, which evoked the fear. To analyse children’s reactions after anaesthesia to anaesthetic play equipment, 49 children (three—six years old) were video-filmed during play with anaesthetic equipment 14 days after anaesthesia and surgery. The risk that the child avoided playing with anaesthetic equipment was increased if the child took the premedication unwillingly and if the child was younger. The risk for not telling about the experience was increased if the child took the premedication unwillingly and if the child showed signs of shyness. The risk for telling mostly unspecific memories increased if the child was younger and if the child showed signs of shyness. Avoidant reactions could bee seen in 50 percent of the children. It is important to be aware of the characteristics of a vulnerable child (age, shyness) and to meet the child without raising negative emotions in any part of the anaesthetic process, in order to avoid negative reactions in future encounters.

  • 9.
    Råsmark Hammar, Görel
    et al.
    Oskarshamn.
    Ozolins, Andrejs
    Växjö.
    Idvall, Ewa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Nursing Science.
    Rudebeck, Carl Edward
    University of Tromsö.
    Body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy2009In: Journal of Child Health Care, ISSN 1367-4935, E-ISSN 1741-2889, Vol. 13, no 1, p. 19-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study aims to describe important features of body image in adolescents with motor disabilities and compare them against similar features in able-bodied peers. Relational aspects of body image were given preference in a questionnaire distributed to 35 adolescents with cerebral palsy and 98 adolescents with no known disabilities. Similarities were shown, but also significant differences, indicating a less favourable body image in adolescents with cerebral palsy. It is paramount for young people who are constantly reminded of physical restrictions to experience body vitality. Professionals need to consider the importance of how they interact with young people when seeking to promote a positive body image

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