liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bellon-Harn, Monica L.
    et al.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Hartwell Azios, Jamie
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Dockens, Ashley L.
    Lamar University, TX 77710 USA.
    Manchaiah, Vinaya
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Lamar University, TX 77710 USA; Audiol India, India.
    Speech-language pathologists preferences for patient-centeredness2017In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 68, p. 81-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose: Preferences for patient-centeredness is an important indicator in healthcare service delivery. However, it remains largely unexplored in the field of communication science and disorders. This study investigated speech-language pathologists (SLPs) preferences for patient-centeredness Method: The study involved a cross-sectional survey design. SLPs (n = 102) fully completed the modified Patient-Practitioner Orientation Scale (PPOS; Krupat et al, 2000) and also provided demographic details. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics, correlation, and linear regression methods. Results: Mean PPOS scores indicated that SLPs value patient-centeredness. There was a strong positive correlation among sharing and caring subscales with the full-scale. Results from the linear regression modeling suggested no relationship between demographic factors and preferences for patient-centeredness. Conclusions: SLPs value patient-centeredness, although there may be regional and cultural variations. Qualitative investigations may help uncover dimensions of patient-centeredness that were not captured in the PPOS scale. In addition, further research should explore congruence in preferences for patient-centeredness among SLPs and patients.

  • 2.
    Classon, Elisabet
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rudner, Mary
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Rönnberg, Jerker
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Working memory capacity compensates for hearing related phonological processing deficit2013In: Journal of Communication Disorders, ISSN 0021-9924, E-ISSN 1873-7994, Vol. 46, no 1, p. 17-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Acquired hearing impairment is associated with gradually declining phonological representations. According to the Ease of Language Understanding (ELU) model, poorly defined representations lead to mismatch in phonologically challenging tasks. To resolve the mismatch, reliance on working memory capacity (WMC) increases. This study investigated whether WMC modulated performance in a phonological task in individuals with hearing impairment. A visual rhyme judgment task with congruous or incongruous orthography, followed by an incidental episodic recognition memory task, was used. In participants with hearing impairment, WMC modulated both rhyme judgment performance and recognition memory in the orthographically similar non-rhyming condition; those with high WMC performed exceptionally well in the judgment task, but later recognized few of the words. For participants with hearing impairment and low WMC the pattern was reversed; they performed poorly in the judgment task but later recognized a surprisingly large proportion of the words. Results indicate that good WMC can compensate for the negative impact of auditory deprivation on phonological processing abilities by allowing for efficient use of phonological processing skills. They also suggest that individuals with hearing impairment and low WMC may use a non-phonological approach to written words, which can have the beneficial side effect of improving memory encoding. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLearning outcomes: Readers will be able to: (1) describe cognitive processes involved in rhyme judgment, (2) explain how acquired hearing impairment affects phonological processing and (3) discuss how reading strategies at encoding impact memory performance.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf