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  • 1.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Neurology.
    Kiviloog, Liisa
    Andersson, Jan
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Cognitive impairment in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder - A matched control study2003In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 18, no 4, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: To verify the occurrence of cognitive impairment in patients with chronic whiplash-associated disorder (WAD) and to provide a more detailed description of the impairment's character and context. Methods: Thirty (30) patients with chronic WAD and 30 matched healthy controls completed a cognitive test battery. Four computerised tests were used: a) two different types of cognitive tasks (reaction time vs. working memory) and b) two types of information processing (verbal vs. spatial). Before testing and after every randomised subtest, subjects rated their pain level on a visual analogue scale. Results: A worse overall performance among patients with WAD and, specifically, worse results concerning working memory tasks were found. Post-hoc testing revealed a statistically significant difference concerning the single variable "verbal reaction time". Pain intensity among patients increased significantly during testing. Pain intensity after the subtest for verbal mental reaction time (independent of test sequence) was significantly correlated with results in this subtest, the more pain, the more time was needed. Conclusion: Compared to healthy controls, patients performed worse overall. Concerning verbal reaction time, the impairment was correlated with pain intensity. The findings support the hypothesis that pain might be one important factor leading to cognitive impairment in patients with chronic WAD.

  • 2.
    Arvidsson, Patrik
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Granlund, Mats
    Jonköping University, Sweden; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Thyberg, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    How are the activity and participation aspects of the ICF used? Examples from studies of people with intellectual disability2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 45-49Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Interdisciplinary differences regarding understanding the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) concepts activity/participation may hinder its unifying purpose. In the ICF model, functioning (and disability) is described as a tripartite concept: 1) Body structures/functions, 2) Activities, and 3) Participation. Activities refer to an individual perspective on disability that does not tally with the basic structure of social models. OBJECTIVE: To review how activity and participation are actually used in studies of intellectual disability (ID). CONCLUSION: Based on 16 papers, four different usages of activity/participation were found. 1) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept with attempts to use it. 2) Theoretical reference to tripartite ICF concept without actual use of activities. 3) "Atheoretical" approach with implicit focus on participation. 4) Theoretical reference to bipartite concept with corresponding use of terms. The highlighted studies have in common a focus on participation. However, the usage of the term "activity" differs both within and between studies. Such terminology will probably confuse interdisciplinary communication rather than facilitating it. Also, the use of an explicit underlying theory differs, from references to a tripartite to references to a bipartite concept of disability. This paper is focused on ID, but the discussed principles regarding the ICF and interdisciplinary disability theory are applicable to other diagnostic groups within rehabilitation practices.

  • 3.
    Hägg, Mary K. D.
    et al.
    Hudiksvall Hospital, Sweden; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Tibbling, Lita I. E.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Effects on facial dysfunction and swallowing capacity of intraoral stimulation early and late after stroke2015In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 36, no 1, p. 101-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with post-stroke dysphagia are also affected by facial dysfunction in all four facial quadrants. Intraoral stimulation can successfully treat post-stroke dysphagia, but its effect on post-stroke facial dysfunction remains unknown. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to investigate whether intraoral stimulation after stroke has simultaneous effects on facial dysfunction in the contralateral lower facial quadrant and in the other three facial quadrants, on lip force, and on dysphagia. METHODS: Thirty-one stroke patients were treated with intraoral stimulation and assessed with a facial activity test, lip force test, and swallowing capacity test at three time-points: before treatment, at the end of treatment, and at late follow-up (over one year after the end of treatment). RESULTS: Facial activity, lip force, and swallowing capacity scores were all improved between baseline and the end of treatment (P less than 0.001 for each), with these improvements remaining at late follow-up. Baseline and treatment data did not significantly differ between patients treated short and late after stroke. CONCLUSIONS: Treatment with intraoral stimulation significantly improved post-stroke dysfunction in all four facial quadrants, swallowing capacity, and lip force even in cases of long-standing post-stroke dysfunction. Furthermore, such improvement remained for over one year after the end of treatment.

  • 4. Lindström, B.
    et al.
    Kristensen, B.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Pain and Rehabilitation Centre.
    Dynamic strength and endurance of the thight muscles in patients with minimum sequel after ischaemic stroke.1999In: NeuroRehabilitation (Reading, MA), ISSN 1053-8135, E-ISSN 1878-6448, Vol. 12, p. 157-167Article in journal (Refereed)
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