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  • 1. Hagfors, Linda
    et al.
    Leanderson, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Sköldstam, Lars
    Andersson, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Pain and Occupational Centre, Occupational and Environmental Medicine Centre.
    Johansson, Gunnar
    Antioxidant intake, plasma antioxidants and oxidative stress in a randomized, controlled, parallel, Mediterranean dietary intervention study on patients with rheumatoid arthritis2003In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 2Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Previously we have reported that patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) obtained a significant reduction in disease activity by adopting a Mediterranean-type diet. The present study was carried out to investigate the antioxidant intake, the plasma levels of antioxidants and a marker of oxidative stress (malondialdehyde) during the study presented earlier. Methods: RA patients randomized to either a Mediterranean type diet (MD group, n = 26) or a control diet (CD group, n = 25) were compared during a three month dietary intervention study. Their antioxidant intake was assessed by means of diet history interviews and their intake of antioxidant-rich foods by a self-administered questionnaire. The plasma levels of retinol, antioxidants (a- and ?-tocopherol, ▀-carotene, lycopene, vitamin C and uric acid) and urinary malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker for oxidative stress, were determined using high performance liquid chromatography. The Student's t-test for independent samples and paired samples were used to test differences between and within groups. For variables with skewed distributions Mann-Whitney U-test and Wilcoxon signed ranks test were performed. To evaluate associations between dietary intake of antioxidants, as well as between disease activity, MDA and antioxidants we used Pearson's product moment correlation or Spearman's rank correlation. Results: The MD group had significantly higher intake frequencies of antioxidant-rich foods, and also higher intakes of vitamin C (p = 0.014), vitamin E (p = 0.007) and selenium (p = 0.004), and a lower intake of retinol (p = 0.049), compared to the CD group. However, the difference between the groups regarding vitamin C intake was not significant when under- and over-repoters were excluded (p = 0.066). There were no changes in urine MDA or in the plasma levels of antioxidants (after p-lipid adjustments of the tocopherol results), from baseline to the end of the study. The levels of retinol, vitamin C and uric acid were negatively correlated to disease activity variables. No correlation was found between antioxidant intake and the plasma levels of antioxidants. Conclusions: Despite an increase in reported consumption of antioxidant-rich foods during the Mediterranean diet intervention, the levels of plasma antioxidants and urine MDA did not change. However, the plasma levels of vitamin C, retinol and uric acid were inversely correlated to variables related to RA disease activity.

  • 2.
    Hu, Minyu
    et al.
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, China.
    Li, Yi-Lin
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, China.
    Jiang, Chonghe
    bMedical College of Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China.
    Liu, Zhao-Qian
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, China.
    Qu, Shulin
    bMedical College of Hunan Normal University, Changsha, China.
    Huang, Yiming
    School of Public Health, Central South University, Changsha, China.
    Comparison of lycopene and fluvastatin effects on atherosclerosis induced by a      high-fat diet in rabbits2008In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 24, no 10, p. 1030-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]
    Objective

    We evaluated the antiatherogenic effect of lycopene in rabbits fed a high-fat diet.

    Methods

    Forty adult male rabbits were divided into five groups that were fed a standard diet, a high-fat diet, a high-fat diet plus 4 mg/kg of lycopene, a high-fat diet plus 12 mg/kg of lycopene, and a high-fat diet plus 10 mg/kg of fluvastatin, respectively. Lycopene and fluvastatin were administered intragastrically. The level of serum total cholesterol, total triglyceride, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, total antioxidant capacity, and malondialdehyde were measured before and after 4 and 8 wk of experimental treatment. In addition, plasma levels of lycopene, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, serum nitric oxide, and interleukin-1 were measured after the experiment. The area of atherosclerotic plaque and pathologic changes of the aorta were evaluated.

    Results

    Compared with the control, levels of total cholesterol, total triacylglycerol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, malonaldehyde, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, and interleukin-1 were increased and total antioxidant capacity and nitric oxide were decreased in the animals with a high-fat diet (P < 0.05). Intragastric administration of lycopene counteracted the change in these parameters (P < 0.05). In this case, the data showed that lycopene in the used dose was better than the fluvastatin intervention. Morphologic analysis revealed that lycopene and fluvastatin markedly reduced the formation of atherosclerotic plaques in the aorta compared with the situation in rabbits on a high-fat diet alone.

    Conclusion

    Lycopene, like fluvastatin, significantly attenuated atherogenesis in rabbits fed a high-fat diet.

  • 3. Sköldstam, L
    et al.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Hagfors, L
    Johansson, G
    Weight reduction is not a major reason for improvement in rheumatoid arthritis from lacto-vegetarian, vegan or mediterranean diets2005In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 4, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Xu, Jie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jonsson, Tommy
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Plaza, Merichel
    Univ Alcala De Henares, Spain; Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Hakansson, Asa
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Antonsson, Martin
    ProViva AB, Sweden.
    Ahren, Irini Lazou
    Probi AB, Sweden.
    Turner, Charlotta
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Spegel, Peter
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Granfeldt, Yvonne
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Probiotic fruit beverages with different polyphenol profiles attenuated early insulin response2018In: Nutrition Journal, ISSN 1475-2891, E-ISSN 1475-2891, Vol. 17, article id 34Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Consumption of polyphenol-rich fruits and vegetables may improve postprandial glucose and insulin levels and hence promote well-being. Previously it has been observed that consumption of bilberry decreases the postprandial insulin demand. The intention with the present study was to compare the impact of different supplements with various polyphenol profiles, on the postprandial glucose and insulin responses in healthy young adults. Methods: In a randomized, controlled, crossover study the postprandial glycemic and insulin responses were observed in eleven healthy adults after intake of five different beverages containing bilberry (European blueberry), blackcurrant, beetroot, mango and rose hip, respectively; all drinks were enriched with the same composition of fermented oatmeal and probiotics. The control was a glucose drink. The profile and content of the polyphenols in the different beverages were determined by HPLC-DAD analysis. The antioxidative capacity of the different beverages were measured by TEAC and DPPH assays. Results: Beverages containing bilberry, blackcurrant, mango or rose hip significantly attenuated the early postprandial insulin response (0-90 min), but showed no effect on glucose response. Drinks with bilberry or rose hip reduced the insulin response from the very early phase (0-30 min), and had significantly lower insulin index compared with the control. The efficiency of the bilberry and rose hip to decrease early postprandial insulin responses correlated with higher phenolic contents. Conclusions: Supplements with bilberry, blackcurrant, mango or rose hip in the tested probiotic and oatmeal enriched beverage attenuated early-phase insulin response, but had no effect on the postprandial glycemic response. The improved ability of bilberry and rose hip to lower the very early phase of insulin response seems to be due to a higher phenolic content.

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