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  • 1.
    Anaby, Dana
    et al.
    School of Physical and Occupational Therapy, McGill University, Montreal, Canada.
    Vrotsou, Katerina
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Media and Information Technology. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Kroksmark, Ulla
    Sahlgrenska Academy, Institute of Neuroscience and Physiology, University of Gothenburg, Göteburg, Sweden.
    Ellegård, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Changes in participation patterns of youth with physical disabilities following the Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation intervention: A time-geography approach2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The PREP (Pathways and Resources for Engagement and Participation), an innovative 12-week occupational therapy intervention that focuses on changing the environment, was found effective in improving the participation of youth in specific chosen community-based activities.

    Objective: To complement existing evidence, this study explored changes in overall participation patterns of youth with physical disabilities following the PREP intervention.

    Methods: Guided by time-geography approach, 13 youth aged 12–17 completed a 24-hr diary using the Aday app during one typical weekday and another day during the weekend, pre- and post-intervention. Data of 50 diaries were plotted and analyzed using the VISUALTimePAcTS program.

    Results: Following the PREP, youth were engaged in less digital media and more in study-related activities. Number of occurrences and time spent doing activities with friends were greater post-intervention, whereas time spent doing activities at home was quite similar, particularly during the weekdays. During the weekends, however, youth spent slightly less time at home.

    Conclusions and significance: Findings provide preliminary support for the effectiveness of the PREP, extending beyond the accomplishment of specific targeted activities towards a change in the overall daily patterns of youth. Such knowledge can redirect occupational therapists’ attention to environment-focused interventions involving real-life experiences.

  • 2.
    Andreassen, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Assessing occupational performance in special housing in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 6, p. 428-435Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Assessing occupational performance is commonly done by occupational therapists[OT] working in special housing in municipal elder care. Assessments should be relevant and evidence-based. Even so, we know little about how assessment of occupational performance is conducted in special housing.

    Aim: The aim of this study was to identify OTs’ use and perceptions of different methods to assess occupational performance for elderly clients living in special housing.  

    Method: An email questionnaire was sent to OTs working in special housing in Sweden. Data was analyzed using descriptive and parametric statistics.

    Results: The findings, based on data from 660 respondents, showed that OTs regularly assessed occupational performance but did not use standardized assessment instruments or structured methods to any great extent. In general, OTs reported that they were not pleased with their ability to assess their clients; however, OTs with higher education and with responsibility for fewer clients were more pleased with their assessments and stated that they had more knowledge about assessment methods. Conclusion: To support OTs in using structured assessments of occupational performance in everyday practice, organization as well as structures in the work environment and educational development need to be taken into consideration.

  • 3. Aronsson, B
    et al.
    Perk, J
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Norlén, S
    Hedbäck, Bo
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Cardiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Cardiology.
    Resuming domestic activities after myocardial infarction: a study in female patients2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, p. 39-44Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Asbjørnslett, Mona
    et al.
    Oslo University .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Participation at school as experienced by teenagers with physical disabilities2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 153-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the experiences that teenagers with physical disabilities have of their participation at school. Fourteen students from several locations in Norway aged between 13 and 18 years took part. Data were collected through focus-group interviews and individual interviews. The analysis revealed three main themes: Just like the others-but not quite; Participation in terms of being where things actually happen and; Participation as student-teacher cooperation. A major finding was the importance the students put on being where things actually happen, this being regarded as being even more important than doing the same activities as the other students. Opportunities to increase cooperation by holding short meetings with teachers on how to solve both practical and learning problems promoted participation. The need to include the individual's experience in the concept of participation is discussed.

  • 5.
    Bergström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ahlstrand, Inger
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Thyberg, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Jonköping University, Sweden; Curtin University, Australia.
    Börsbo, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Björk, Mathilda
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Rheumatology.
    Like the worst toothache you've had - How people with rheumatoid arthritis describe and manage pain2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 468-476Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a chronic inflammatory disease often associated with disability. Despite new treatments, pain and activity limitations are still present. Objectives: To describe how persons with RA experience and manage pain in their daily life. Methods: Seven semi-structured focus groups (FGs) were conducted and analyzed using content analysis. Results: The analysis revealed four categories: 1) Pain expresses itself in different ways referred to pain as overwhelming, aching or as a feeling of stiffness. 2) Mitigating pain referred to the use of heat, cold, medications and activities as distractions from the pain. 3) Adapting to pain referred to strategies employed as coping mechanisms for the pain, e.g. planning and adjustment of daily activities, and use of assistive devices. 4) Pain in a social context referred to the participants social environment as being both supportive and uncomprehending, the latter causing patients to hide their pain. Conclusions: Pain in RA is experienced in different ways. This emphasizes the multi-professional team to address this spectrum of experiences and to find pain management directed to the individual experience that also include the persons social environment.

  • 6. Björklund, Anita
    et al.
    Svensson, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Sociology.
    Read, Sanna
    Holistic and biomedical concepts of health: A study of health notions among Swedish occupational therapists and a suggestion for developing an instrument for comparative studies2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 141-150Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objectives of this study were to inquire into notions of health among a group of 439 Swedish occupational therapists and to test a model derived from a qualitative study by Björklund & Svensson with a representative sample of occupational therapists in Sweden. The data were collected through a questionnaire and were analyzed using descriptive statistics, cluster analysis, and confirmatory factor analysis. The means and ranking of the health notions showed that Swedish occupational therapists most frequently hold holistic notions of health, and to a lesser extent biostatistical ones. Most Swedish occupational therapists indicate that being clearly conscious of one's health notions is important both to themselves and to their profession. The test of the model provides a step towards developing an instrument for measuring notions of health that clearly distinguishes between holistic and biomedical ones and that could possibly be used for comparative studies.

  • 7.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lidström, Helene
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thelin, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Computer use in educational activities by students with ADHD2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5, p. 357-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: The aim of this study was to investigate computer use in educational activities by students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in comparison with that of students with physical disabilities and students from the general population.

    Methods: The design of the study was cross-sectional with group comparison. Students with ADHD (n = 102) were pair-matched in terms of age and sex with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population (n = 940) were used as a reference group.

    Results: The study showed that less than half of the students with ADHD had access to a computer in the classroom. Students with ADHD reported significantly less frequent use of computers for almost all educational activities compared with students with physical disabilities and students from the general population. Students with ADHD reported low satisfaction with computer use in school. In addition, students with ADHD reported a desire to use computers more often and for more activities in school compared with students with physical disabilities.

    Conclusions: These results indicate that occupational therapists should place more emphasize on how to enable students with ADHD to use computers in educational activities in school.

  • 8.
    Boman, Inga-Lill
    et al.
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Lindberg Stenvall, Charlotte
    Danderyd Hospital.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Karolinska Institute.
    Bartfai, Aniko
    Danderyd Hospital.
    A training apartment with a set of electronic memory aids for patients with cognitive problems2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 17, no 2, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aims were to investigate whether patients with memory difficulties after acquired brain injury (ABI) are able to learn how to use a set of electronic memory aids integrated in a training apartment, and to use the same setting for identifying activities that these patients tend to forget among a predefined set of activities. This identification is done by using a computer system to register activities that are not performed, which the system is designed to act upon with reminders or alarms. During a stay of five days in the training apartment, 14 patients received training from an experienced occupational therapist to learn how to use the electronic memory aids. Significant improvements were found at group level in learning how to use the electronic memory aids. Computer registrations showed that the refrigerator and the stove were most challenging to remember. The total number of alarms and reminders as indication/measure of memory difficulties did not correlate with the Rivermead Behavioral Memory Test scores in the individuals. These findings indicate the importance of a stay in a training apartment to examine whether or not patients have difficulties in everyday activities and to try out electronic memory aids that might support these difficulties before they are discharged from the rehabilitation clinic.

  • 9.
    Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, p. 80-88Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding peoples experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 10.
    Borell, Lena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Nygård, Louise
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Asaba, Eric
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Gustavsson, Anders
    Stockholm University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Qualitative approaches in occupational therapy research.2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 521-529Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Objective: Development of research in occupational therapy requires a continuous critical discussion concerning methodological approaches. In this paper the authors wish to contribute to such a discussion by introducing the Formal Data-Structure Analysis approach (FDSA) as a method for understanding people's experiences. Methods and results: A review of selected publications from occupational therapy journals between 2003 and 2005 illustrated that qualitative articles within occupational therapy publications were mainly descriptive in nature. This finding raises questions about how to develop new knowledge that contributes to occupational therapy. Conclusions: In this paper the authors suggest that it is possible to apply the FDSA approach not only when describing and categorizing qualitative phenomena, but also when aiming to reach an in-depth understanding of issues related to human meaning-making; for example, how we understand engagement in occupations or living with a disability. Examples of the application of the FDSA approach are included and discussed.

  • 11.
    Borgestig, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Falkmer, Torbjorn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Curtin University, Australia .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Improving computer usage for students with physical disabilities through a collaborative approach: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 463-470Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of an assistive technology (AT) intervention to improve the use of available computers as assistive technology in educational tasks for students with physical disabilities during an ongoing school year. Methods: Fifteen students (aged 12-18) with physical disabilities, included in mainstream classrooms in Sweden, and their teachers took part in the intervention. Pre-, post-, and follow-up data were collected with Goal Attainment Scaling (GAS), a computer usage diary, and with the Psychosocial Impact of Assistive Devices Scale (PIADS). Teachers opinions of goal setting were collected at follow-up. Results: The intervention improved the goal-related computer usage in educational tasks and teachers reported they would use goal setting again when appropriate. At baseline, students reported a positive impact from computer usage with no differences over time regarding the PIADS subscales independence, adaptability, or self-esteem. Discussion: The AT intervention showed a positive effect on computer usage as AT in mainstream schools. Some additional support to teachers is recommended as not all students improved in all goal-related computer usage. A clinical implication is that students computer usage can be improved and collaboratively established computer-based strategies can be carried out by teachers in mainstream schools.

  • 12.
    Breivik, Ingrid
    et al.
    Habilitation Centre, Östersund Hospital, Jämtland County Council, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Experiences of handwriting and using a computerized ATD in school: Adolescents with Asperger's syndrome2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 5Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adolescents with Asperger's syndrome (AS), often have handwriting difficulties that affect their academic performance. The purpose of this descriptive multiple-case mixed-method study was to highlight how adolescents with AS experience writing in the school setting when writing by hand and when using a computerized Assistive Technology Device (ATD), for writing. A qualitative content analysis approach was used, including interviews with five adolescents, their parents, and their teachers. This was complemented by asking the adolescents to rate their perceived performance and satisfaction of writing with and without the ATD. All adolescents described handwriting difficulties, but a reduced ability to express oneself in writing was also common. Initiating and completing writing tasks was often so demanding that it caused resistance to the activity. Several advantages when using the ATD were described by the participants and the self-ratings showed higher scores for performance of and satisfaction with writing when the ATD was used. The results show that teachers' encouragement seemed to be important for the initiation and continuation of use of the ATD.

  • 13.
    Brorsson, Anna
    et al.
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Öhman, Annika
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Cutchin, Malcolm
    University of South Carolina at Chapel Hill.
    Nygård, Louise
    1Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Occupational Therapy, Karolinska Institutet,.
    Managing critical incidents in grocery shopping by community-living people with Alzheimer's disease.2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 4, no 20, p. 292-301Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: People with Alzheimer's disease (AD) remain in their ordinary housing and continue to use public space despite increasing disabilities. The aim of this study was to discover and describe problematic situations and critical incidents that took place when people with AD performed the ordinary outside-home activity of grocery shopping and how these were met by them. Methods: Individual interviews (n = 12) and participant observations (n = 8) with six informants were performed and analysed using a grounded theory approach. Results: The findings are presented in six categories and each category describes different critical incidents and actions used to meet these. The categories were: (a) Remembering to bring things when leaving home, (b) Finding the way to and from the grocery shop without getting lost, (c) Finding a way through traffic when not feeling safe, (d) Finding objects when organization is disrupted, (e) Choosing when a lot of objects and products are available, and (f) Finding a method to pay when payment opportunities are restricted. The core category, “A challenging and unstable process of meeting critical incidents in grocery shopping”, was characterised by reflections and creativity to achieve relative harmony in each critical incident. Conclusions: In conclusion, it is important that relatives and professionals take into account relevant actions to help people with AD coordinate with their environment.Read More: http://informahealthcare.com/doi/abs/10.3109/11038128.2012.752031

  • 14.
    Daremo, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Activity and participation in psychiatric institutional care2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 131-142Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    National action plans emphasize the importance of strengthening the role of patients in health and medical care. Patients should feel that they can participate and that they are seen as a resource. In occupational therapy, the client-centred approach has developed, whereby it is key to enable patients to participate in their treatment. The International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) has inspired this study, in which concepts such as activity and participation are central. The purpose of the study was to describe how patients in psychiatric institutional care conceive their opportunities to be active, and how they participate in their own treatment. Questionnaires were sent to patients who had received care during a six-month period. Ten patients were then selected for interview. The study shows that younger patients and patients who were treated involuntarily were generally more dissatisfied than other patients. The patients' perceptions of their environment were influenced by the values in the ward. Topics such as atmosphere in the ward, reception, continuity, and support were presented. Important factors related to activity and participation were: agreement concerning the treatment plan, discussions about expectations, creating conditions for engagement in activities, and providing the patients with opportunities to take responsibility for themselves.

  • 15.
    Donlau, Marie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mattsson, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Glad Mattsson, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Children with myelomeningocele and independence in the toilet activity: A pilot study2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 64-70Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Regarding adult life and independence the most common obstacles for young adults with myelomeningocele (MMC) are cognitive dysfunction and difficulties in performing toilet activities. A step-by-step method with goal setting for the training of self-care in toilet activities for children with MMC was evaluated. Method: Twenty-two children with MMC and bladder and bowel dysfunction (12 girls, 10 boys) aged 3-17.2 (m 9.1) were included. The toilet activities were observed at home jointly by an occupational therapist and urotherapist. Goal-setting procedures of self-training were promoted. Observation scores before and after intervention were compared, the goal setting being evaluated on a Goal Attainment Scale (GAS). Results: Fifteen children who trained in self-catheterization had a median observation score of 22 before and 37 after the training period (p = 0.002). Another seven trained in trans-rectal irrigation with a median score of 30 before and 49 after (p = 0.02). As a result of GAS all children improved, of whom 17 reached the goal or even more so than expected. Conclusions: In this pilot study mutual goal setting in a step-by-step training programme based on professional observation of the toilet activity at home showed a better outcome than traditionally performed training in a hospital setting or with traditional habilitation support.

  • 16.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia; Curtin University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Wagman, Petra
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Australia; Jonköping University, Sweden.
    Viewpoints of working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists on role balance strategies2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 366-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Occupational therapists need to be cognizant of evidence-based role balance advice and strategies that women with multigenerational caring responsibilities can implement independently or with minimal assistance, as role balance may not be the primary goal during many encounters with this population. Hence, this study aimed to identify the viewpoints on the most helpful role balance strategies for working sandwich generation women, both from their own perspectives and from the perspective of occupational therapists. This was achieved through a Q methodology study, where 54 statements were based on findings from interviews, sandwich generation literature and occupational therapy literature. In total, 31 working sandwich generation women and 42 occupational therapists completed the Q sort through either online or paper administration. The data were analysed using factor analysis with varimax rotation and were interpreted through collaboration with experts in the field. The findings revealed similarities between working sandwich generation women and occupational therapists, particularly in terms of advocating strategies related to sleep, rest and seeking practical assistance from support networks. Differences were also present, with working sandwich generation women viewpoints tending to emphasize strategies related to coping with a busy lifestyle attending to multiple responsibilities. In contrast, occupational therapy viewpoints prioritized strategies related to the occupational therapy process, such as goal setting, activity focused interventions, monitoring progress and facilitating sustainable outcomes.

  • 17.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia .
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin University, Perth, Australia; Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin University, Perth, Australia, Jönköping University, Sweden; La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan University, Perth, Australia; Curtin University, Perth, Australia.
    The complexity of role balance: Support for the Model of Juggling Occupations2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 334-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This pilot study aimed to establish the appropriateness of the Model of Juggling Occupations in exploring the complex experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities living in Perth, Australia. Methods: In meeting this aim, an evaluation was conducted of a case study design, where data were collected through a questionnaire, time diary, and interview. Results: Overall role balance varied over time and across participants. Positive indicators of role balance occurred frequently in the questionnaires and time diaries, despite the interviews revealing a predominance of negative evaluations of role balance. Between-role balance was achieved through compatible role overlap, buffering, and renewal. An exploration of within-role balance factors demonstrated that occupational participation, values, interests, personal causation, and habits were related to role balance. Conclusions: This pilot study concluded that the Model of Juggling Occupations is an appropriate conceptual framework to explore the complex and dynamic experience of role balance amongst working women with family responsibilities. It was also confirmed that the case study design, including the questionnaire, time diary, and interview methods, is suitable for researching role balance from this perspective.

  • 18.
    Evans, Kiah L.
    et al.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Telethon Kids Inst, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    Millsteed, Jeannine
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Richmond, Janet E.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia.
    Falkmer, Marita
    Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center. Curtin Univ, Australia; Jonkoping Univ, Sweden; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Girdler, Sonya J.
    Edith Cowan Univ, Australia; Curtin Univ, Australia.
    The impact of within and between role experiences on role balance outcomes for working Sandwich Generation Women2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 184-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Women combining paid employment with dual caring responsibilities for children and aging parents, otherwise known as the sandwich generation, experience both benefits and costs related to role participation and quality of life. However, previous literature is inconclusive regarding the impact of this role combination on role balance. In the context of these mixed findings on role balance for working sandwich generation women, this study aimed to explore how within role characteristics and between role interactions are related to role balance for these women. This aim was achieved through the use of a questionnaire administered to 18 Australian working sandwich generation women. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and correlation coefficients, with findings suggesting the women studied tended to experience neither role balance or role imbalance. Within-role characteristics, particularly within the mother and family member roles, were related to role balance. In addition, between-role conflict and role interactions involving either the home maintainer or family member roles had the greatest impact on role balance.

  • 19.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Paediatric Habilitation Community Service.
    Anund, Anna
    Sörensen, Gunilla
    Falkmer, Marita
    The transport mobility situation for children with autism spectrum disorders2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 11, no 2, p. 90-100Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to investigate the transport mobility situation for children with autism spectrum disorders, questionnaires from 1,631 parents were analysed. The results showed that almost 3 out of 4 parents were worried when their child was transported by school transport or by the Special Transport System. Transports in the family vehicle caused worry among almost half of the parents. The parents' worries were justified by the fact that the children were not transported according to general safety recommendations. Moreover, it was common for the children to be transported with unfamiliar drivers, as well as with unknown passengers, which is known to be quite problematic. Transport mobility adaptation to this particular group of children with disabilities refers merely to implementation of knowledge and a specific, well-structured approach among the drivers towards the children during the ride, rather than to physical/mechanical adaptation of the vehicles.

  • 20.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Vogel, K
    Gregersen, NP
    The test of visual perceptual skills (non-motor) upper level is not a valid predictor for the outcome of driver education2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 72-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In order to reduce the monetary and personal costs of driver training for persons with cerebral palsy, it is of interest to find a predictor that is able to select potential license holders. Previous research has shown that such a predictor could be one that assesses visual perception. In the present study, the Test of Visual Perceptual Skills (non-motor) Upper Level, was validated for predicting the outcome of driver education. It was found that using the test for this purpose could not be recommended. The findings of the present study were not in accordance with the results of other studies on the predictive value of perceptual tests regarding the ability to drive, owing to the use of different methods. Future studies should focus on cross-validation of perceptual tests for different types of independent variables, such as driving license or not, accident involvement and driving ability.

  • 21.
    Flensner, Gullvi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderhamn, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS)2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 170-180Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Fatigue is a complex phenomenon that, for those not affected, is hard to understand. To achieve better assessments, caregivers need reliable and valid tools. The aim of this study was to investigate the reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS) among working-aged individuals diagnosed with multiple sclerosis (MS), as well as in a comparative group randomly selected from the general population in the same geographical area. Both individuals with MS (n=161) and individuals recruited from the general population (n=194) participated in the study. A questionnaire was used for the data collection. The data were analysed using non-parametric statistical methods. Reliability of FIS was addressed by item-to-item and item-to-total correlations. Concurrent validity was tested for by analysing correlations between the FIS and general questions, and construct validity by investigation of differences in the FIS scores between known groups. The FIS was found to be homogenous, with item-to-total correlation coefficients of 0.42 ≤ rs≤0.86 (p<0.001), reflecting the instrument's reliability. The correlations between the FIS and the general questions confirm its concurrent validity, 0.27 ≤ rs≤0.84 (p<0.001). The differences in FIS scores between known groups demonstrate its construct validity. Furthermore, the FIS showed the ability to discriminate between groups of individuals with differences in perceived impact of fatigue.

  • 22.
    Glännfjord, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elderly people’s perceptions of using Wii sports bowling – A qualitative study2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 5, p. 329-338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Nintendo Wii is a gaming console with motion-sensitive controls that is making inroads into health care and rehabilitation. However, there is still limited knowledge on how elderly people perceive the use of such a product. The aim of this study was to examine how the use of the Wii Sports Bowling in an activity group was perceived by elderly people. The data consisted of observations and interviews with participants who used Wii Sports Bowling and was analysed with content analysis. The findings are described in three themes; ‘The use of the Wii Sports game’, ‘Engagement in the game’ and ‘Social interaction around the activity’. Wii Sports Bowling was described as easier to play compared to real-life bowling and was enjoyable and a social activity. The opportunity to meet the group each week was important for the participants. Playing the game resulted in signs of immersion and a flow-like state. The Wii was perceived to be easy to use, to provide a way to socialize with peers and to give opportunities to participate in activities in a new way. More studies regarding elderly people’s experiences and apprehensions regarding new technology such as gaming consoles and virtual reality are needed.

  • 23.
    Gustavsson, Martha
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Larsson Ranada, Åsa
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Everyday doings in a nursing home - described by residents and staff2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 6, p. 435-441Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: For many groups of elderly people it is important to be active, which can be hindered by disabilities that come with age. Research has progressed in this area but mostly concerns the elderly living at home. The aim of this study was to examine how residents and staff at a nursing home described the residents everyday doings. Methods: A nursing home was selected in which 15 of the residents and six of the staff were interviewed about the residents activities during an ordinary day and week. Results: The material was analysed using qualitative content analysis in which two categories emerged: shared doings and individual doings. The shared doings were important for supporting the residents in their social and physical activities, but participation in these was often hampered by reduced functions. The individual doings, where the residents own interests can be promoted, were also hampered by their disabilities. Being able to be active and having something to do were emphasized, either continuing with previous activities or participating in shared activities at the nursing home. Conclusions: Receiving care and being forced to adjust to the context at the nursing home had a significant impact on the residents daily doings. Most of the residents needed help to be able to continue performing their activities or to find new ones. The social environment consisting of other residents and staff also influenced the residents activities.

  • 24.
    Haglund, lena
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Occupational therapists´ agreement in screening patients in general psychiatric care for occupational therapy1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, no 3, p. 61-67Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 25.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forsyth, Kirsty
    Queen Margaret University, Edinburgh, Scottland, UK.
    The measurement properties of the Occupational Circumstances Interview and Rating Scale - Sweden (OCAIRS-S V2)2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 20, no 6, p. 412-419Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM:

    This paper reports the measurement properties of the Occupational Circumstances Assessment Interview and Rating Scale - Sweden (OCAIRS-S V2). The OCAIRS is a semi-structured interview and rating scale designed to capture, in detail, a person's occupational participation. The English version 4.0 has been translated into Swedish. The psychometric properties of the Swedish version are unknown.

    METHODS:

    Eleven Swedish occupational therapists working in mental health completed 38 OCAIRS-S (V2) assessments in addition to linking videotapes. A total of 60 clients were, therefore, entered into the analysis. Many-faceted Rasch analysis was used to analyse the data.

    RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS:

    Results supported internal, construct, and person response validity of the OCAIRS-S (V2). Inter-rater reliability was established. The scale was shown to discriminate between people who were living in the community. In addition, the results indicate a need to explore the skill items.

  • 26.
    Haglund, Lena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care.
    Karlsson, Gunilla
    Kielhofner, Gary
    Shea Lai, J
    Validity of the Swedish version of the worker role interview.1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, no 4, p. 23-29Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 27.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Editorial2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 28.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Borell, Lena
    Karolinska institutet, Stockholm.
    The development of an assessment of adjustment needs in the school setting for use with physically disabled students1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 156-162Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 29.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Umeå University.
    Bernspång, Birgitta
    Umeå University.
    Validity of the school Setting Interview: An Assessment of the Student - Envirement Fit2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 11, p. 171-178Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The School Setting Interview (SSI) is an internationally used client-centred interview assessment that specifically investigates the student - environment fit for students with physical disabilities. In this study the Rasch measurement model was used to examine validity of the SSI; specifically, whether or not the SSI measures a unidimensional construct. Data for analysis included SSI assessments of 87 Swedish students with physical disabilities aged between 8 and 19 years of age. The results of the Rasch analysis revealed that all items had acceptable infit MnSq and z values supporting evidence of construct validity of the SSI. The established order of the difficulty of the items was also shown to be in acceptable congruence with the theoretical basis for item development. In addition, the analysis revealed aspects of the SSI that need improvements, such as the need for more challenging items and refinements of the manual. Further investigations of validity in different cultural contexts are recommended.

  • 30.
    Johansson, Gun
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hultin, Hanna
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Möller, Jette
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Hallqvist, Johan
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Katarina
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Public Health Sciences.
    The impact of adjustment latitude on self-assessed work ability in regard to gender and occupational type2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 4, p. 350-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Adjustment latitude describes opportunities to change demands at work when ill and may affect work ability. The aim here is to study the association between adjustment latitude and self-assessed work ability among men and women and employees from different occupational sectors.

    Methods: This cross-sectional study used data from a questionnaire sent to 3020 employees in three occupational sectors in Sweden; 1430 responded. Subjects were divided into: full, moderately reduced, and greatly reduced work ability. Presence of nine adjustment opportunities was requested and subjects were divided into three groups. Each specific opportunity was also analyzed in relation to work ability. Multinomial logistic regression was used for analyses.

    Results: Number of opportunities to adjust was associated with work ability among men and employees in health care. "Shortening the working day" was associated with work ability in most groups. For men and industrial employees, "postponing work", "going home and working later", and "working without disturbance" were associated with work ability. "To work from home" was associated with work ability among women and employees in insurance.

    Conclusions: The assumption that adjustment latitude affects work ability is supported. Associations differ with regard to gender and occupational sectors. Further studies with longitudinal design and alternative samples are needed.

  • 31.
    Johansson, Maria M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Geriatric. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine.
    Validation of the Neurobehavioral Cognitive Status Examination and the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test in investigations of dementia2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 282-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this retrospective study was to validate two commonly used instruments, Cognistat and the Rivermead Behavioural Memory Test, RBMT, for detection of MCI and mild dementia. Two different diagnosis groups, mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and Alzheimer's disease combined with mixed dementia representing mild dementia (MD), were compared with a group of patients who did not receive a diagnosis of dementia. All patients were assessed at a specialized outpatient memory clinic in a university hospital in Sweden using the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), Cognistat, and RBMT. Sensitivity, specificity, predictive value, and likelihood ratio were calculated for the tests. The Cognistat and RBMT have moderate validity in the detection of MCI and mild dementia. On their own, none of the tests used is sufficient for diagnosing MCI or mild dementia. A combination of the Cognistat and RBMT provides additional information in early stage dementia; in this regard the RBMT is better than the Cognistat, which also has other limitations. The RBMT can be helpful for distinguishing between MCI and mild dementia. There is a need for a more sensitive screening test to capture early cognitive impairment related to patients' occupational performance and problems in daily life.

  • 32.
    Johansson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Acute Internal Medicine and Geriatrics.
    Development of an instrument for measuring activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 230-239Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: According to the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare, structured assessment of function and activity has high priority when investigating for dementia.

    Aim/objectives: The aim was to develop and psychometrically test an instrument to measure self-reported and/or informant-reported ability to perform activities of daily living in persons with suspected cognitive impairment.

    Material and methods: The Cognitive Impairment in Daily Life (CID) instrument has been developed in several phases. Content validity was achieved through five expert panels using a Content Validity Index (CVI). The content was tested further in a pilot study of 51 patients and 49 relatives from primary care or a specialist memory clinic.

    Results: Content validity was good with a CVI index of 0.83. All patients considered that relevant activities were included. Most relatives considered that the activities included in the instrument were adequate and captured the patients’ difficulties in daily life. Some adjustments to the items and scale were suggested and these were done after each phase. In general, relatives indicated more difficulties than patients.

    Conclusion: The CID instrument seems promising in terms of content validity. Further testing of reliability and construct validity is ongoing.

  • 33.
    Kjeken, Ingvild
    et al.
    National Resource Center for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Dagfinrud, Hanne
    National Resource Center for Rehabilitation in Rheumatology, Diakonhjemmet Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Commentary on the paper “Reliability and validity of the Swedish version of the Fatigue Impact Scale (FIS)”2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 133-134Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No abstract available.

  • 34.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bolic, Vedrana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Utilization of an ICF-based assessment from occupational therapists' perspectives2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 3, p. 274-281Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) is intended to provide a framework for practitioners. A client-centred ICF-based assessment (ICF-A) was developed to be used by occupational therapists in problem identification. The aim was to evaluate the ICF-based assessment (ICF-A) focusing on the examination of its utility on the basis of occupational therapists' perspectives regarding clinical relevance and potential for implementation. Eleven occupational therapists, most of whom worked in hospitals, performed in total 99 ICF-A based assessments and completed three self-reported questionnaires related to the utility of the ICF-A, resulting in a total of 121 questionnaires. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics and directed content analysis. The results from this initial testing of ICF-A showed that its clinical relevance was considered low since ICF-A included too many categories. In addition, the time needed to perform the assessments decreased during the 10 assessment occasions. Furthermore, concerning its implementation potential, the client-centred approach in the ICF-A was rated as weak. The target group did not benefit from using ICF-A in a hospital context. Hence, an investigation of its utility among occupational therapists in community and primary care will be the next step in the development of the ICF-A.

  • 35.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Taylor, Renée
    Department of Occupational Therapy, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, USA.
    The myth of participation in occupational therapy: reconceptualizing a client-centred approach2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 421-427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Participation is often the comprehensive objective of treatment but also an indication of the extent to which the process of occupational therapy is client-centred. The purpose of this study was to explore levels of participation during occupational therapy among clients in the area of mental health from the occupational therapists' perspectives. Additionally the authors sought to identify factors that might hinder client participation. Postal questionnaires were sent out to 670 Swedish occupational therapists working with persons with mental illness and learning disabilities. The questionnaire required therapists to rate clients' levels of participation during occupational therapy. Findings indicated that the most common level of participation for the clients was interdependent, meaning that problems, goals, and plans were identified jointly and collaboratively with the occupational therapist. However, more than 20% of the clients were described as being dependent. Almost 90% of the occupational therapists rated client participation in therapy to be very important and nearly 70% claimed that client participation in general needed to be increased. Occupational therapists rated the primary barriers to participation as being clients' inability to participate and organizational and financial problems. Implications of these findings for education in client-centred practice approaches are discussed.

  • 36.
    Kocher Stalder, Cornelia
    et al.
    Institute of Occupational Therapy at Zurich University of Applied Sciences , Winterthur , Switzerland.; b Neuropaediatrics , University Childrens Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institutet, University Stockholm, Stockholm , Sweden.; Department of Occupational Therapy University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, USA..
    Steinlin, Maja
    Neuropaediatrics, University Childrens Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland..
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Children's and teachers' perspectives on adjustments needed in school settings after acquired brain injury.2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 25, no 4, p. 233-242Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Children with acquired brain injury (ABI) often present with functional deficits that influence their societal participation and well-being. Successful reintegration into school calls for individual support to meet each child’s adjustment needs. The adjustment needs of children with ABI in school settings have not previously been explored.

    Aim: The objectives of the present study were (a) to describe adjustment needs in school settings for children with ABI and (b) to explore differences and similarities between reports from the children and their teachers.

    Methods: In this cross-sectional study, 20 children with ABI (mean age 12.8 ± 3.4 years; class grade 1–10) and their teachers were interviewed individually, using the School Setting Interview (SSI). Data were analyzed with descriptive and with non-parametric statistics.

    Results: (a) In the overall group, children rated that 55.6% of the 16 activities in the SSI needed no adjustment. The corresponding percentage for teachers was 48.4%. (b) In the child-teacher pairs, there was a positive relationship between teachers’ and children’s responses only in 3 out of 16 school activities and agreement varied strongly according to the activity in question.

    Conclusions and significance: It is important for occupational therapists and other professionals to specifically consider adjustment needs relating to school activities from various perspectives when aiming to provide individualized interventions.

  • 37.
    Kåhlin, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Choice and control for people ageing with intellectual disability in group homes2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 2, p. 127-137Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Many people ageing with intellectual disabilities (ID) age in place in group homes. Participation is a central concept in support and service to people with ID, but age is often a determining factor for participation among this group. Choice and control are dimensions of participation.

    Aim: The aim of this article is to explore how choice and control in the everyday life of people ageing with ID is expressed and performed in the group home’s semi-private spaces.

    Material and methods: Participant observations and interviews with residents and staff were conducted in four different group homes in Sweden that had older residents.

    Results: Four categories were found that can be understood as aspects of choice and control in the group home’s semi-private spaces in the everyday life of people ageing with ID. These categories included aspects such as space and object, time and routines, privacy, and a person-centred approach.

    Conclusion and significance: People ageing with ID are vulnerable when it comes to maintaining choice and control in various situations in the home’s semi-private spaces. It is argued that occupational therapists should include this occupational arena in their evaluations and interventions for people ageing with ID.

  • 38.
    Larsson, Helena
    et al.
    Karolinska institutitet, Stockholm.
    Lundberg, Catarina
    Karolinska universitetssjukhuset, Stockholm.
    Falkmer, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Paediatric Habilitation Community Service.
    Johansson, Kurt
    Karollinska institutet, Stockholm.
    A Swedish survey of occupational therapists' involvement and performance in driving assessments2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 215-220Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which occupational therapists (OTs) are involved in driving assessments in Sweden and how these assessments are performed. A questionnaire was sent to 154 geriatric, rehabilitation, and neurological clinics, and additionally directly to 19 OTs who had purchased a test battery specifically used for driving assessments. The response rate was 60%. Of those responding, 57% reported being involved in fitness-to-drive assessments. However, such assessments were carried out in various manners and diverse methods were used, ranging from unstandardized activity assessments to a test developed specifically for driving assessments. Only 19% used on-road driving tests as a complement to the clinical assessments. Apart from the lack of appropriate methods, the respondents said that they did not have sufficient knowledge to perform driving assessments and expressed a need for further education. In the future it seems necessary for OTs in Sweden to undergo specialized training and perform the assessments on a regular basis to maintain a high level of competence as driving assessors.

  • 39.
    Larsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    A review of research with elderly people as respondents reported in occupational therapy journals2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 116-126Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to review research presented in occupational therapy journals with the elderly as respondents. With an increasing number of elderly people in society research including the elderly should play a vital role within occupational therapy especially since emphasis on subjective experience is an important factor in the core constructs of occupation. Through a review of six occupational therapy journals, covering the period 2001--2006, it was discovered that 15% of the total number of articles included the elderly as respondents. The published articles with the elderly as respondents were mainly quantitative with the most frequent subject being instrument developing and testing. Most studies had a population group of mixed ages, making it hard to draw conclusions concerning the elderly population. The conclusion is that more research of a qualitative nature reflecting the subjective perspectives of the elderly is needed, especially regarding the oldest age group since this is the fastest growing and there is still limited knowledge regarding their perspective on matters concerning their everyday lives and their doings. Technological developments are implied to benefit elderly people but more research and discussion is needed on how this will affect both the elderly and occupational therapy theory and practice.

  • 40.
    Larsson, Åsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hagberg, Jan-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity . Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Doing everyday life-experiences of the oldest old2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 99-109Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this article is to explore how a group of elderly people, living and managing on their own, describe and experience their everyday doings. Interviews and observations were conducted with 18 community-living people aged 85 and above. The experiences of 'Doing everyday life' are described in five overarching themes: 'Experiencing being old', 'Doings in everyday life', 'Patterns of the day', 'Altered doings', and 'The importance of time'. What is done during an ordinary day does not differ much from earlier in life, but how the doings are performed has changed. Being occupied and staying healthy and sound in mind was stressed as important in old age and even if reduced energy and functional constraints limited the doings, a strong volition to manage independently was expressed. The participants perceived society as regarding the elderly as useless and worthless. Knowledge emanating from the very old themselves is vital to diversify the image of elderly people and to offer interventions and support adapted to their needs and desires.

  • 41.
    Lexell, Eva Mansson
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden; Skane Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Haglund, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Packer, Tanya
    Dalhousie Univ, Canada; Radboud Univ Nijmegen, Netherlands.
    The "Managing Fatigue" programme for people with multiple sclerosis - acceptance and feasibility with Swedish occupational therapists2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Fatigue is common among people with multiple sclerosis (MS), and significantly influences engagement in occupations. The Managing Fatigue (MF) programme is an evidence-based occupational therapy group-based intervention, utilising self-management science that provides people with tools to manage fatigue. Although the national MS-guidelines in Sweden cite this as best practice, a Swedish version is not available. Aim: To translate and investigate the feasibility of a Swedish MF programme delivered by occupational therapists working with MS clients in Sweden. Material and methods: We used a mixed-methods design. Eight recruited occupational therapists, participated in a workshop prior to delivering the MF programme. Following programme delivery, they completed a questionnaire and participated in focus group interviews. Results: Each therapist conducted one programme with 5-9 MS clients. Overall, therapists were satisfied with programme content, and delivery was followed. Minor improvements were suggested, specifically in relation to how cognitive fatigue can be managed. Therapists acknowledged challenges moving from "expert" to supporting self-management. Conclusion: The MF programme is feasible in Sweden, and its client-centred and occupation focus is consistent with therapists scope of practice. In the future, acceptability and satisfaction from the perspectives of MS participants should be examined. Larger, more robust intervention studies evaluating effectiveness are also warranted.

  • 42.
    Lidström, Helene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Benefits of the use of ICT in school activities by students with motor, speech, visual, and hearing impairment: a literature review2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 251-266Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    Information and communication technology (ICT) has the potential to enhance participation in educational activities for students with physical disabilities. Even though incorporating ICTs into teaching and learning in education has become an important issue, it is unclear what evidence research has provided. The aim of this study was to investigate types of ICT items and how ICT is being used by students with physical disabilities, and describe the benefits of ICT use in school activities.

    METHODS:

    A systematic literature search, covering the period 2000-May 2012, was performed in the databases AMED, CINAHL, Eric, OTseeker, Psych Info, PubMed, and Scopus. Data analysis entailed extracting, editing, grouping, and abstracting findings.

    RESULTS:

    A total of 32 articles were included, 16 of which were intervention studies. More than half of the studies concerned students with motor impairments. Type of ICT used differed among impairment groups, and ICT seemed to be especially beneficial for writing, spelling, and communication.

    CONCLUSIONS:

    Even though the review found heterogeneity across the studies students seemed to benefit from ICT use regardless of the type. For future research it is important to highlight intervention studies, especially for students with visual, hearing, and communication impairments.

  • 43.
    Mårtensson, Lena
    et al.
    Göteborgs universitet, Sweden.
    Liedberg, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Occupational Therapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Occupational life trajectories in the context of chronic pain and immigration2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 383-390Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Persons with chronic pain report a range of occupational problems. The specific health needs of immigrants are judged to be poorly understood, and health systems are not prepared to respond adequately. Being an immigrant is regarded as a risk factor for the progression of chronic widespread pain into a state of disability. Objectives To explore occupational life trajectories among immigrant women with chronic pain. Material and methods A qualitative content analysis was used to capture the latent meaning of experiences in individual interviews of eight women with immigrant background and chronic pain. Results An overarching theme, 'making the best of a conditional situation', representing the women's occupational life trajectories, covers the content of two categories: 'being controlled', including affected self-perception, social relations, and future prospects, and 'trying to deal with challenges', comprising a focus on resources, having trust in one's own judgements and getting help from others. Conclusion and significance The experiences demonstrate an occupational life controlled by internal and external factors and may be understood as a disrupted occupational life trajectory. This knowledge may be helpful to occupational therapists supporting immigrant women's attempts to regain a structured life despite the constant presence of pain.

  • 44.
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Tema Health and Society.
    On the notion of health as ability1997In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 3, p. 101-105Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 45.
    Nordenfelt, Lennart
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    On the notion of health as ability2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, p. 48-52Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper an outline of a theory of health based on the notion of ability is presented. A persons health is defined as his or her second-order ability to realize vital goals given standard or otherwise reasonable circumstances. The crucial concepts: vital goal, standard circumstance and second-order ability, are characterized in the paper. Special emphasis is laid upon the third concept, second-order ability, which is of particular importance for the theory of rehabilitation.

  • 46.
    Peolsson, Michael
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sätterlund-Larsson, U.
    Trollhättan | Uddevalla University, Vänersborg, Sweden.
    Living with chronic pain: A dynamic learning process2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 7, no 3, p. 114-125Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on how patients describe and manage their pain in their everyday life. The data consist of interviews with 37 patients undergoing treatment for chronic pain. The study focuses on how experiences of pain are mediated and interpreted with the help of the individual's discursive resources. It is argued that this kind of resource is important in constituting a structure of relations between a suffering person, pain and context. In the analysis of the material a four-step procedure was used, including both formal and content-related aspects. It was found that the patients describe chronic pain as a dynamic phenomenon. Patients learn about their pain by actively constituting relations among themselves, the pain and their activities. For the patients, chronic pain is a structured phenomenon. Patients often describe how pain is initiated, worsens and is alleviated. Patients thereby learn to distinguish different figures in their pain, which they are able to relate to in their management of pain. This suggests that a life in pain could be seen as an apprenticeship process. The heart of the matter in this process is learning to become sensitive to and flexible towards variations in the pain and potential pain triggers in the environment. This knowledge is important, as mastering pain is a balancing act between inner resources and environmental circumstances.

  • 47.
    Perneros, Gerd
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tropp, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Sandqvist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Evaluation of occupational performance and pain intensity: before and after back surgery and rehabilitation2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 69-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: The study had a descriptive, longitudinal design and evaluated occupational performance and pain intensity in daily occupations for patients with low back pain (LBP), assessed preoperatively, and at six and 12 months after surgery and rehabilitation. Methods: Patients were assessed by surgeons and occupational therapists (OTs) to determine whether surgery was required. The OTs used the Assessment of Pain and Occupational Performance (POP) instrument. The POP measures 36 occupations in two dimensions: occupational performance and pain intensity. Patients with specific LBP (n = 97) were included. Results: Preoperatively, 23 occupations showed lower performance and "severe pain". At six months, 27 occupations were performed "without restriction" (p = n.s. -less than 0.001) and without pain or with "mild pain" (p less than 0.001). A comparison of preoperative values with those at 12 months showed that 35 occupations were significantly changed on both scales, and 31 occupations were performed "without restriction" (p less than 0.01-less than 0.001) and "without pain" (p less than 0.001). Conclusions: The results indicate significant improvements between baseline, six months, and 12 months. Moreover, when occupational performance and pain intensity were separately identified, it was shown that patients had regained their performance at an ordinary level without pain. This underlines the added value of differentiating between disability and pain.

  • 48.
    Pooremamali, Parvin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Morville, Anne-Le
    Metropolitan University of Coll, Denmark.
    Eklund, Mona
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Barriers to continuity in the pathway toward occupational engagement among ethnic minorities with mental illness2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 259-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ethnic minorities have particular needs and difficulties in terms of support for meaningful occupations, lack of access to and use of occupation-based rehabilitation services. They are not established in the labour market and are seldom in paid employment. This study aimed to investigate how mentally ill ethnic minority clients experience, feel and think about participation in occupation-based rehabilitation, and potential barriers they might encounter. Nine participants experiencing mental illness and receiving occupation-based rehabilitation were interviewed. Grounded theory methods were used in order to collect and analyze data. One core category, barriers for a continuous path towards enriched and meaningful occupation described the participants experiences of a variety of barriers related to personal, occupational and system factors that hindered participation in occupation-based rehabilitation and influenced their need for occupational development and growth. The core category was composed of; personal-related barriers, occupational-related barriers, and system-related barriers as well as six related sub-categories. These barriers interacted continually across time and space in ways that increased the participants sense of occupational deprivation and alienation. The findings also suggested that the issues of paid employment for ethnic minorities with mental illness should feature on the agenda of local, regional and state politicians and professionals involved in occupational rehabilitation.

  • 49.
    Pros , Caroline
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kjellberg, Anette
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Health, Activity, Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Supervision in occupational therapy regarding rehabilitation of elderly people in Sweden2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 15, no 4, p. 221-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to investigate occupational therapists supervision of healthcare workers regarding rehabilitation of elderly people in Swedish municipal elderly care. Data were collected through a self-report questionnaire developed for this study. In total, 238 occupational therapists working with supervision of healthcare workers in the field of municipal elderly care participated in the study. Data were analysed using descriptive statistics. For supervising healthcare workers, the participants rated highly the importance of cooperation and communication. Many of the participants considered both the time available for one supervision session and the number of supervision sessions to be insufficient. The result also demonstrated that the participants supervised healthcare workers more frequently in P-ADL than in I-ADL. A majority of the participants supervised other groups of people in addition to healthcare workers. The lack of research work in supervision specific to occupational therapy indicates a need for more studies in this area.

  • 50.
    Ryd, Charlotta
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nygard, Louise
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Malinowsky, Camilla
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Öhman, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Kottorp, Anders
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Zurich University of Appl Science, Switzerland.
    Associations between performance of activities of daily living and everyday technology use among older adults with mild stage Alzheimers disease or mild cognitive impairment2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Occupational Therapy, ISSN 1103-8128, E-ISSN 1651-2014, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 33-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The use of everyday technology (ET) is important for many activities in daily life (ADL) and can be especially challenging for older adults with cognitive impairments. Objective: The aim was to explore associations between ADL performance and perceived ability to use ET among older adults with mild stage Alzheimers disease (AD) and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). ADL motor and process ability, and ability to use ET were also compared between the groups. Methods: Participants with AD (n = 39) and MCI (n = 28) were included. Associations and group differences were explored with nonparametric statistics. Results: Significant correlations were found between ADL process ability and ET use in both groups (R-s = 0.44 and 0.32, p less than 0.05), but for ADL motor ability and ET use, correlations were only found in the MCI group (R-s = 0.51, p less than 0.01). The MCI group had significantly higher measures of ADL process ability (p less than 0.001) and ET use (p less than 0.05). Conclusion: ADL performance ability and perceived ability to use ET are important to consider in evaluations of older adults with cognitive impairments. Group differences indicate that measures of ADL performance ability and ET use are sensitive enough to discriminate the MCI group from the AD group with individually overlapping measures.

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