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  • 1.
    Bea, Sara
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Stand firm: Resisting the self-improvement craze2019In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566Article, book review (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 2.
    Bergnéhr, Disa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Where is the child? A discursive exploration of the positioning of children in research on mental-health-promoting interventions2015In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 37, no 2, p. 184-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explores the discursive positioning of children in research articles on mental–health-promoting interventions. The questions under investigation are: are children positioned as active or passive agents, are children’s health and wellbeing contextualised, and if so how? How is the child perceived; that is, how are age, gender, socioeconomic status, family structure, dis/ability, and so on accounted for? We found that the positioning of the child as passive and formed by adults prevails; health is largely individualised and decontextualised in that it is depicted as being contingent on the person’s own capabilities. However, there are instances in which children are positioned as active subjects, their opinions are in focus, and their health and wellbeing are connected to social relations and context. We propose a more active discussion about how children and wellbeing are conceptualised in the outlining, implementation and research of public health interventions. Moreover, children – just like adults – should be increasingly regarded as service users who are entitled to have a say in matters that concern them.

  • 3.
    Berner, Boel
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The making of a risk object: AIDS, gay citizenship andthe meaning of blood donation in Sweden in the early1980s2011In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 33, no 3, p. 384-398Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the early 1980s acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS) presented a danger to the blood supply, the extent of which was difficult to ascertain before a reliable test became available in 1985. In a situation of uncertainty, the major Swedish gay organisation in early 1983 recommended voluntary exclusion from blood donation by their members, while internationally gay organisationsprotested and Swedish medical authorities hesitated about the appropriate actionto take. At stake were definitions of gay citizenship, risk and the gift of blood. The article uses three sociological approaches to understand the controversies around blood from men-who-have-sex-with-men as a risk to public health. An institutional approach is used to situate the symbolic meaning of blood donation within the specific Swedish blood collection regime, and thus the possible stigma of exclusion from donation practices. The article then details the evolution of different risk objects, based on different actors’ situated knowledge of the danger, and discusses the different framing conditions influencing decision-making by the various actors involved. The analysis uses extensive archival and secondary material to trace decisions taken in the gay movement, medical authorities and blood centres, and to assess their outcome on the spread of AIDS via the blood supply.

  • 4.
    Forss, A.
    et al.
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, 23300 SE-141 83 Huddinge, Sweden.
    Tishelman, C.
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, Stockholms Sjukhem Foundation, R. and D. Unit, Sweden.
    Widmark, C.
    Department of Nursing, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden, Department of Public Health Sciences, Division of International Health, Karolinska Institutet, Sweden.
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Women's experiences of cervical cellular changes: An unintentional transition from health to liminality?2004In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 306-325Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cervical cancer screening is a preventive intervention directed towards women to both detect cervical cancer and identify those at risk for developing this disease. It has been argued that participation in screening programmes and early detection situations may lead to new kinds of sickness experiences. This article is based on qualitative phenomenological hermeneutical analysis of interviews with women who have received abnormal Pap smear test results through a population-based outreach screening programme in urban Sweden. The aim of this article is to illuminate the meaning, for the participating women, of the lived experience of receiving notification about an abnormal Pap smear result. The data are presented in terms of two themes: Pap smear for routine and recurrent confirmation of health and unexpected and ambiguous communication about Pap smear results. The findings are discussed as an unintentional transition from confirmation of health to liminality. Whereas medical diagnosis has been discussed as structuring the inchoate, an abnormal Pap smear did not create order for the interviewed women. On the contrary, the notification of an abnormal Pap smear created disorder as the women had expected to be confirmed as healthy but instead neither health nor disease were confirmed or excluded. Even 'simple' technology is shown to have an ontological dimension, with the ability to transform daily taken-for-grantedness of ourselves as primarily healthy to (potentially) unhealthy.

  • 5.
    Horne, Judith
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    Department of Psychology, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK.
    Doing ‘being on the edge’: Managing the dilemma of being authentically suicidal in an online forum2009In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 170-184Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Those who attempt suicide have often been described as ‘crying for help’, and there are implications if such cries are not taken seriously. This paper examines how users of an Internet forum for ‘suicidal thoughts’ work up their authenticity in their opening posts, and how these are responded to by fellow forum users. Data were taken from two Internet forums on suicide over a period of one month and were analysed using discursive psychology. The analysis demonstrates that participants display their authenticity through four practices: narrative formatting, going ‘beyond’ depression, displaying rationality and not explicitly asking for help. Furthermore, both initial and subsequent posts worked up identities as being psychologically ‘on the edge’ of life and death. The analysis suggests that the forum in part works as a site for suicidal identities to be tested out, authenticated and validated by individuals. We conclude with some suggestions for the supportive work of suicide ‘postvention’.

  • 6.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Letting Stories Breathe: A Socio-narratology2012In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 34, no 1, p. 159-160Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 7.
    Lauritzen, SO
    et al.
    Stockholm Univ, Dept Educ, S-10691 Stockholm, Sweden Tema Inst, Dept Commun Studies, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Normality, risk and the future: implicit communication of threat in health surveillance2001In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 497-516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the practice of health surveillance, health professionals have to cope with the task of communicating outcomes of tests and measurements, as well as counselling individuals about present and future threats to their own or their children's health. Research in this field has shed some light on the 'language of risk' and its implications for how the individual understands and deals with health in everyday life. Here, we want to further this exploration of the language of risk and to discuss the meaning of risk, normality and deviance. We focus on the implicit or explicit introduction and interpretation of threat in the communication between health professionals and patients in two programmes of health surveillance: child health surveillance and surveillance of 40-year-old men. Common themes in these two versions of health surveillance are discussed in relation to the meaning of risk, normality and threats for the future.

  • 8.
    Lundberg, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Margareta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Starrin, Bengt
    Department of Social Sciences, Karlstad University, Sweden.
    Status incongruence revisited - associations with shame and mental well-being (GHQ)2009In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 478-493Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study purpose: Status incongruence has been related to poor health and all-cause mortality, and could be a growing public health problem due to changes in the labour market in later decades. Shaming experiences have been suggested as playing a part in the aetiology. Our aim was to study the risk for shaming experiences, pessimism, anxiety, depressive feelings, and poor mental well-being (GHQ) with a special focus on shame, in four status categories: negatively and positively incongruent individuals, and low-status and high-status congruent individuals.

    Method: Data comprised 14 854 working men and women from a regional sample of randomly selected respondents, 18-79 years. Logistic regression was used to study differences in risk for negative emotional outcomes. Results: The negative incongruent category persisted as the group most at risk for all negative emotional outcomes (OR 1.5-1.9; p<0.05-<0.001). When testing the risk for poor mental well-being among the status categories with and without shaming experiences, OR for all groups with shaming experiences were elevated. Among groups without shame, only the negative incongruent category remained at risk (OR 2.7; p<0.05) after adjustment.

    Conclusion: Negative incongruent status is associated with adverse emotional outcomes, among them shame, which is a previously unappreciated aspect of status incongruence.

  • 9.
    Taghizadeh Larsson, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jeppsson-Grassman, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Bodily changes among people living with physical impairments and chronic illnesses: biographical disruption or normal illness?2012In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 34, no 8, p. 1156-1169Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article focuses on individuals who are growing old with chronic illnesses and early onset impairments. Their experience of illness complications, bodily and functional losses is similar to what Bury has referred to as a biographical disruption. However, whereas Bury argues that a chronic illness amounts to a critical situation for the individual, partly due to its unexpected nature, this does not apply to the participants in our two studies. A second difference concerns Bury’s implicit suggestion that the disruption is a single event that is characteristic of the early stage of a chronic illness. Repeated disruptions seemed to shape the lives of several of those interviewed. At the same time, this article challenges studies which suggest that the notion of disruption is less relevant to people in later life and to those who have experienced difficult lives, and also questions the argument that continuity rather than change characterises the lives of people who have had chronic conditions since their early years. In its approach, the article responds toWilliams’ request for studies in the sociology of chronic illness that extend the predominant biographical focus on the middle years of life to both ends of the life course.

  • 10.
    Van Parys, Hanna
    et al.
    Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Provoost, Veerle
    Bioethics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Zeiler, Kristin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    De Sutter, Petra
    Ghent University Hospital, Ghent, Belgium.
    Pennings, Guido
    Bioethics Institute Ghent, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Buysse, Ann
    Psychology and Educational Sciences, Ghent University, Belgium.
    Constructing and enacting kinship in sister-to-sister egg donation families: a multi-family member interview study2017In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 847-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although intra-familial egg donation has been practiced for more than 15 years in several countries, little is known about family relationships in this family type. Framed within the new kinship studies, this article focuses on the experiential dimension of kinship in sister-to-sister egg donation families: how is kinship unpacked and reconstructed in this specific family constellation? Qualitative data analysis of interviews with receiving parents, their donating sisters and the donor children revealed six themes: (1) being connected as an extended family; (2)disambiguating motherhood; (3) giving and receiving as structuring processes; (4) acknowledging and managing the special link between donor and child; (5)making sense of the union between father and donor; and (6) kinship constructions being challenged. This study showed the complex and continuous balancing of meanings related to the mother-child dyad, the donor-child dyad and the donor-father dyad. What stood out was the complexity of, on the one hand cherishing the genetic link with the child allowed by the sisters egg donation, while, on the other, managing the meanings related to this link, by, for instance, acknowledging, downsizing, symbolising, and differentiating it from the mother-child bond. (A Virtual Abstract of this paper can be accessed at: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC_979cmCmR9rLrKuD7z0ycA))

  • 11.
    Vogel, Else
    Amsterdam Institute of Social Science Research, University of Amsterdam.
    Enjoy your food: on losing weight and taking pleasure2014In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 36, no 2, p. 305-317Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Does healthy eating require people to control themselves and abstain from pleasure? This idea is dominant, but in our studies of dieting in The Netherlands we encountered professionals who work in other ways. They encourage their clients to enjoy their food, as only such joy provides satisfaction and the sense that one has eaten enough. Enjoying one's food is not easy. It depends on being sensitive. This does not come naturally but needs training. And while one kind of hunger may be difficult to distinguish from another, feeling pleasure may open the doors to feeling pain. What is more, sensitivity is not enough: enjoying one's food also depends on the food being enjoyable. A lot of care is required for that. But while engaging in such care is hard work, along the way clients are encouraged to no longer ask 'Am I being good?' but to wonder instead 'Is this good for me?' Both these questions are normative and focus on the person rather than on her socio-material context. However, in the situations related here the difference is worth making. For it entails a shift from externally controlling your behaviour to self-caringly enjoying your food.

  • 12.
    Vogel, Else
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Technology and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Operating (on) the self: transforming agency through obesity surgery and treatment2018In: Sociology of Health and Illness, ISSN 0141-9889, E-ISSN 1467-9566, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 508-522Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, I describe the processes through which patients diagnosed with 'morbid obesity' become active subjects through undergoing obesity surgery and an empowerment lifestyle programme in a Dutch obesity clinic. Following work in actor-network theory and material semiotics that complicates the distinction between active and passive subjects, I trace how agency is configured and re-distributed throughout the treatment trajectory. In the clinic's elaborate care assemblage - consisting of dieticians, exercise coaches and psychologists - the person is not only actively involved in his/her own change, the subject of intervention is the self as 'actor': his/her material constitution, inclinations and feelings. The empirical examples reveal that a self becomes capable of self-care only after a costly and laborious conditioning through which patients are completely transformed. In this work, the changed body, implying a new, potentially disruptive reality that patients must learn to cope with, is pivotal to what the patient can do and become. Rather than striving to be disembodied, self-contained liberal subjects that make sensible decisions for their body, patients become empowered through submission and attachment and by arranging support.

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