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  • 1.
    Bousquet, J.
    et al.
    University Hospital, France; European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Bewick, M.
    iQ4U Consultants Ltd, England.
    Cano, A.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Eklund, P.
    Umeå University, Sweden; Four Comp Oy, Finland.
    Fico, G.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Goswami, N.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Guldemond, N. A.
    University of Medical Centre Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Henderson, D.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Hinkema, M. J.
    TNO, Netherlands.
    Liotta, G.
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Mair, A.
    Scottish Govt Health Department, Scotland.
    Molloy, W.
    University of Coll, Ireland.
    Monaco, A.
    AIFA Agenzia Italiana Farmaco, Italy.
    Monsonis-Paya, I.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Nizinska, A.
    University of Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Papadopoulos, H.
    National Centre Science Research, Greece.
    Pavlickova, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Pecorelli, S.
    University of Brescia, Italy.
    Prados-Torres, A.
    IIS Aragon Aragon Health Science Institute IACS, Spain.
    Roller-Wirnsberger, R. E.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Somekh, D.
    European Health Futures Forum, England.
    Vera-Munoz, C.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Visser, F.
    Avisco, Netherlands.
    Farrell, J.
    Department Health Social Serv and Public Safety, North Ireland.
    Malva, J.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal; Ageing Coimbra EIP AHA, Portugal.
    Andersen Ranberg, K.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Camuzat, T.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Regional Languedoc Roussillon Midi Pyrenees, France.
    Carriazo, A. M.
    Regional Minist Health Andalusia, Spain.
    Crooks, G.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing, Scotland.
    Gutter, Z.
    University Hospital Olomouc, Czech Republic.
    Iaccarino, G.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Manuel De Keenoy, E.
    Kronikgune, Spain.
    Moda, G.
    Regional Piemonte, Italy.
    Rodriguez-Manas, L.
    Getafe University Hospital, Spain.
    Vontetsianos, T.
    Sotiria Hospital, Greece.
    Abreu, C.
    Coimbra School Nursing, Portugal.
    Alonso, J.
    IMIM Institute Hospital Mar Invest Mediques, Spain.
    Alonso-Bouzon, C.
    Getafe University Hospital, Spain.
    Ankri, J.
    INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Arredondo, M. T.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Avolio, F.
    Regional Puglia, Italy.
    Bedbrook, A.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Bialoszewski, A. Z.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Blain, H.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Bourret, R.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Cabrera-Umpierrez, M. F.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain; University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Catala, A.
    Technical University of Catalonia, Spain.
    OCaoimh, R.
    University of Coll, Ireland.
    Cesari, M.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Chavannes, N. H.
    Leiden University, Netherlands.
    Correia-Da-Sousa, J.
    University of Minho, Portugal.
    Dedeu, T.
    European Regional and Local Health Assoc, Belgium; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Ferrando, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Ferri, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Fokkens, W. J.
    Academic Medical Centre, Netherlands.
    Garcia-Lizana, F.
    Institute Health Carlos III, Spain.
    Guerin, O.
    CHRU Nice, France.
    Hellings, P. W.
    Katholieke University of Leuven, Belgium.
    Haahtela, T.
    Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.
    Illario, M.
    Federico II University Hospital Naples, Italy.
    Inzerilli, M. C.
    Community St Egidio Long Live Elderly Program, Italy.
    Lodrup Carlsen, K. C.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Kardas, P.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Keil, T.
    Charite, Germany; University of Wurzburg, Germany.
    Maggio, M.
    University of Parma, Italy.
    Mendez-Zorrilla, A.
    University of Deusto, Spain.
    Menditto, E.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy.
    Mercier, J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; University of Montpellier, France.
    Michel, J. P.
    European Union Geriatr Medical Soc, Switzerland; European Geriatr Med, Switzerland.
    Murray, R.
    NHS Scotland, Scotland.
    Nogues, M.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    OByrne-Maguire, I.
    AFFINITY, Ireland.
    Pappa, D.
    National Centre Science Research, Greece.
    Parent, A. S.
    AGE Platform Europe, Belgium.
    Pastorino, M.
    University of Politecn Madrid, Spain.
    Robalo-Cordeiro, C.
    Coimbra University Hospital, Portugal.
    Samolinski, B.
    Medical University of Warsaw, Poland.
    Siciliano, P.
    CNR, Italy; INNOVAAL, Italy.
    Teixeira, A. M.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Tsartara, S. I.
    South East Europe Healthcare Integrated Care and Sr, Greece.
    Valiulis, A.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania; European Academic Paediat EAP UEMS SP, Belgium; European Academic Paediat, Belgium.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Vasankari, T.
    Finnish Lung Assoc, Finland.
    Vellas, B.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Vollenbroek-Hutten, M.
    Telemed Grp, Netherlands; University of Twente, Netherlands.
    Wickman, M.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Yorgancioglu, A.
    A Celal Bayar University, Turkey; GARD Execut Comm, Turkey.
    Zuberbier, T.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Barbagallo, M.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Canonica, G. W.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Klimek, L.
    KLIMEK, Germany.
    Maggi, S.
    CNR Aging Branch, Italy.
    Aberer, W.
    Medical University of Graz, Austria.
    Akdis, C.
    University of Zurich, Switzerland.
    Adcock, I. M.
    Imperial Coll London, England; Royal Brompton and Harefield NHS Trust, England.
    Agache, I.
    Transylvania University of Brasov, Romania.
    Albera, C.
    University of Turin, Italy.
    Alonso-Trujillo, F.
    Andalusian Agency Social Serv and Dependency, Spain.
    Angel Guarcia, M.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Annesi-Maesano, I.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Apostolo, J.
    Coimbra School Nursing, Portugal.
    Arshad, S. H.
    David Hide Asthma and Allergy Research Centre, England.
    Attalin, V.
    Aviitam, France.
    Avignon, A.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Bachert, C.
    Ghent University Hospital, Belgium.
    Baroni, I.
    Telbios, Italy.
    Bel, E.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Benson, Mikael
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Children's and Women's health. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Allergy Center.
    Bescos, C.
    Phillips Research Institute, Netherlands.
    Blasi, F.
    University of Milan, Italy.
    Barbara, C.
    Portuguese National Programme Resp Disease, Portugal.
    Bergmann, K. C.
    Charite, Germany; Global Allergy and Asthma European Network, Germany.
    Bernard, P. L.
    University of Montpellier, France.
    Bonini, S.
    University of Naples 2, Italy; Italian National Research Council, Italy.
    Bousquet, P. J.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France.
    Branchini, B.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Brightling, C. E.
    University Hospital Leicester NHS Trust, England; University of Leicester, England.
    Bruguiere, V.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Bunu, C.
    University of Medical and Farm Timisoara, Romania.
    Bush, A.
    Bush A Imperial Coll, England; Royal Brompton Hospital, England.
    Caimmi, D. P.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Calderon, M. A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Canovas, G.
    Maire, France.
    Cardona, V.
    Hospital Valle De Hebron, Spain.
    Carlsen, K. H.
    Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway; Oslo University Hospital, Norway; University of Oslo, Norway.
    Cesario, A.
    IRCCS Azienda Osped Santa Maria Nuova, Italy.
    Chkhartishvili, E.
    Grigol Robakidze University, Rep of Georgia.
    Chiron, R.
    Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Chivato, T.
    University of CEU San Pablo, Spain.
    Chung, K. F.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    DAngelantonio, M.
    Health Informat Management SA, Belgium.
    De Carlo, G.
    EFA European Federat Allergy and Airways Disease Patien, Belgium.
    Cholley, D.
    Direct Regional Serv Med, France.
    Chorin, F.
    CIU Sante, France.
    Combe, B.
    University Hospital, France.
    Compas, B.
    Conseil Dep Herault, France.
    Costa, D. J.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France.
    Costa, E.
    University of Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Coste, O.
    Direct Regional Jeunesse Sports and Cohes Sociale, France.
    Coupet, A. -L.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Crepaldi, G.
    CNR, Italy.
    Custovic, A.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Dahl, R.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Dahlen, S. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Demoly, P.
    INSERM, France; UPMC, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Devillier, P.
    Suresnes University of Versailles St Quentin, France.
    Didier, A.
    Rangueil Larrey Hospital, France.
    Dinh-Xuan, A. T.
    University of Paris 05, France.
    Djukanovic, R.
    University of Southampton, England; NIHR Southampton Resp Biomed Research Unit, England.
    Dokic, D.
    University of Clin Pulmol and Allergy, Macedonia.
    Du Toit, G.
    Kings Coll London, England.
    Dubakiene, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Dupeyron, A.
    University of Montpellier, France; University of Nimes Hospital, France.
    Emuzyte, R.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Fiocchi, A.
    Bambino Gesu Childrens Research Hospital, Italy.
    Wagner, A.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Fletcher, M.
    Educ Heatlh, England.
    Fonseca, J.
    Institute CUF Porto Hospital CUF Porto, Portugal; University of Porto, Portugal.
    Fougere, B.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Gamkrelidze, A.
    National Centre Disease Control and Public Health Georgia, Rep of Georgia.
    Garces, G.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Garcia-Aymeric, J.
    ISGLoBAL, Spain.
    Garcia-Zapirain, B.
    University of Deusto, Spain.
    Gemicioglu, B.
    Istanbul University, Turkey.
    Gouder, C.
    Resident Medical Specialist Medical Mater Dei Hospital, Malta.
    Hellquist-Dahl, B.
    Odense University Hospital, Denmark.
    Hermosilla-Gimeno, I.
    Institute Salud Carlos III, Spain.
    Heve, D.
    Agence Regional Sante, France.
    Holland, C.
    Aston University, England.
    Humbert, M.
    University of Paris 11, France.
    Hyland, M.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Johnston, S. L.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; MRC and Asthma UK Centre Allerg Mech Asthma, England.
    Just, J.
    University of Paris 06, France.
    Jutel, M.
    Wroclaw Medical University, Poland.
    Kaidashev, I. P.
    Ukrainina Medical Stomatol Acad, Ukraine.
    Khaitov, M.
    National Research Centre, Russia.
    Kalayci, O.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Kalyoncu, A. F.
    Hacettepe University, Turkey.
    Keijser, W.
    University of Twente, Netherlands; Health Informat Management Spain SL, Spain.
    Kerstjens, H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Knezovic, J.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kowalski, M.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland; HARC, Poland.
    Koppelman, G. H.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Kotska, T.
    Medical University of Lodz, Poland.
    Kovac, M.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Kull, I.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Kuna, P.
    Barlicki University Hospital, Poland.
    Kvedariene, V.
    Vilnius University, Lithuania.
    Lepore, V.
    AReS Puglia, Italy.
    Macnee, W.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Maggio, M.
    University of Parma, Italy.
    Magnan, A.
    University of Nantes, France; Institute Thorax, France.
    Majer, I.
    University of Bratislava, Slovakia.
    Manning, P.
    Bon Secours Hospital, Ireland.
    Marcucci, M.
    University of Milan, Italy; University of Milan, Italy.
    Marti, T.
    Generalitat Catalunya, Spain.
    Masoli, M.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Melen, E.
    Stockholm County Council, Sweden.
    Miculinic, N.
    Croatian Pulm Soc, Croatia.
    Mihaltan, F.
    National Institute Pneumol M Nasta, Romania.
    Milenkovic, B.
    University of Belgrade, Serbia.
    Millot-Keurinck, J.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Mlinaric, H.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Momas, I.
    Paris Descartes University, France; Paris Municipal Department Social Act Childhood and Heatlh, France.
    Montefort, S.
    University of Malta, Malta.
    Morais-Almeida, M.
    Hospital CUF Descobertas, Portugal; Soc Portuguesa Alergol and Imunol Clin, Portugal.
    Moreno-Casbas, T.
    Institute Health Carlos III, Spain.
    Moesges, R.
    University of Cologne, Germany.
    Mullol, J.
    CIBERES, Spain; CIBERES, Spain.
    Nadif, R.
    INSERM, France; University of Versailles St Quentin En Yvelines, France.
    Nalin, M.
    Telbios, Italy.
    Navarro-Pardo, E.
    University of Valencia, Spain; University of Valencia, Spain.
    Nekam, K.
    Hospital Hospitaller Brothers Buda, Hungary.
    Ninot, G.
    University of Montpellier I, France.
    Paccard, D.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Pais, S.
    University of Algarve, Portugal.
    Palummeri, E.
    Gakkiera Hospital, Italy.
    Panzner, P.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic; Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic.
    Papadopoulos, N. K.
    University of Manchester, England; University of Athens, Greece.
    Papanikolaou, C.
    Laikon Gen Hospital Athens, Greece.
    Passalacqua, G.
    University of Genoa, Italy.
    Pastor, E.
    LETAPE, France; Conseil Regional Ordre Masseurs Kinesitherapeutes, France.
    Perrot, M.
    Regime Social Independants, France.
    Plavec, D.
    University of JJ Strossmayer, Croatia.
    Popov, T. A.
    Alexanders University Hospital, Bulgaria.
    Postma, D. S.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Price, D.
    Optimum Patient Care, England; University of Aberdeen, Scotland.
    Raffort, N.
    Soc Public Locale Exploitat Balaruc Les Bains, France.
    Reuzeau, J. C.
    Caisse Assurance Retraite and Sante Travail Langued, France.
    Robine, J. M.
    INSERM, France; INSERM, France; Ecole Prat Hautes Etud, France.
    Rodenas, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Robusto, F.
    AReS Puglia, Italy.
    Roche, N.
    Hop University of Paris, India.
    Romano, A.
    Complesso Integrato Columbus, Italy.
    Romano, V.
    Piedmonte Reference Site, Italy.
    Rosado-Pinto, J.
    Serv Imunoalergol Hospital Luz Lisboa, Portugal.
    Roubille, F.
    European Innovat Partnership Act and Health Ageing Re, France; Montpellier University Hospital, France.
    Ruiz, F.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Ryan, D.
    Woodbrook Medical Centre, England; University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Salcedo, T.
    University of Politecn Valencia, Spain.
    Schmid-Grendelmeier, P.
    University of Zurich Hospital, Switzerland.
    Schulz, H.
    Helmholtz Zentrum Munchen, Germany.
    Schunemann, H. J.
    University of Freiburg, Germany.
    Serrano, E.
    CHU Rangueil Larrey, France.
    Sheikh, A.
    University of Edinburgh, Scotland.
    Shields, M.
    Queens University of Belfast, North Ireland; Royal Belfast Hospital Sick Children, North Ireland.
    Siafakas, N.
    University Hospital Heraklion, Greece.
    Scichilone, N.
    University of Palermo, Italy.
    Siciliano, P.
    CNR, Italy; INNOVAAL, Italy.
    Skrindo, I.
    Akershun University Hospital, Norway.
    Smit, H. A.
    University of Utrecht, Netherlands.
    Sourdet, S.
    Gerontopole Toulouse, France.
    Sousa-Costa, E.
    University of Porto, Portugal.
    Spranger, O.
    Global Allergy and Asthma Platform GAAPP, Austria.
    Sooronbaev, T.
    Euro Asian Resp Soc, Kyrgyzstan.
    Sruk, V.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Sterk, P. J.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands.
    Todo-Bom, A.
    University of Coimbra, Portugal.
    Touchon, J.
    University Hospital Montpellier, France.
    Tramontano, D.
    University of Naples Federico II, Italy; GENS Fdn, Italy.
    Triggiani, M.
    University of Salerno, Italy.
    Tsartara, S. I.
    South East Europe Healthcare Integrated Care and Sr, Greece.
    Valero, A. L.
    IDIBAPS, Spain.
    Valovirta, E.
    University of Turku, Finland.
    Van Ganse, E.
    University of Lyon 1, France.
    Van Hage, M.
    Karolinska Institute and University Hospital, Sweden.
    Van den Berge, M.
    University of Groningen, Netherlands.
    Vandenplas, O.
    Catholic University of Louvain, Belgium.
    Ventura, M. T.
    University of Bari, Italy.
    Vergara, I.
    VERGARA Itziar Kronikgune, Spain.
    Vezzani, G.
    Research Hospital, Italy; Regional Agency Health and Social Care, Italy.
    Vidal, D.
    University of Valencia, Spain.
    Viegi, G.
    CNR, Italy.
    Wagemann, M.
    University of Klinikum Dusseldorf, Germany.
    Whalley, B.
    University of Plymouth, England.
    Wickman, M.
    Soder Sjukhuset, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Wilson, N.
    North England EU Health Partnership, Australia.
    Yiallouros, P. K.
    Cyprus University of Technology, Cyprus; Hospital Archbishop Makarios III, Cyprus.
    Zagar, M.
    University of Zagreb, Croatia.
    Zaidi, A.
    University of Southampton, England.
    Zidarn, M.
    University of Clin Resp and Allerg Disease, Slovenia.
    Hoogerwerf, E. J.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Usero, J.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Zuffada, R.
    Funka, Sweden.
    Senn, A.
    European Commiss, Belgium.
    De Oliveira-Alves, B.
    European Commiss, Belgium.
    BUILDING BRIDGES FOR INNOVATION IN AGEING: SYNERGIES BETWEEN ACTION GROUPS OF THE EIP ON AHA2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 92-104Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Strategic Implementation Plan of the European Innovation Partnership on Active and Healthy Ageing (EIP on AHA) proposed six Action Groups. After almost three years of activity, many achievements have been obtained through commitments or collaborative work of the Action Groups. However, they have often worked in silos and, consequently, synergies between Action Groups have been proposed to strengthen the triple win of the EIP on AHA. The paper presents the methodology and current status of the Task Force on EIP on AHA synergies. Synergies are in line with the Action Groups new Renovated Action Plan (2016-2018) to ensure that their future objectives are coherent and fully connected. The outcomes and impact of synergies are using the Monitoring and Assessment Framework for the EIP on AHA (MAFEIP). Eight proposals for synergies have been approved by the Task Force: Five cross-cutting synergies which can be used for all current and future synergies as they consider overarching domains (appropriate polypharmacy, citizen empowerment, teaching and coaching on AHA, deployment of synergies to EU regions, Responsible Research and Innovation), and three cross-cutting synergies focussing on current Action Group activities (falls, frailty, integrated care and chronic respiratory diseases).

  • 2.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Malnutrition in elderly people newly admitted to a community resident home1999In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 3, no 3, p. 133-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was to assess nutritional status in elderly people, newly admitted to a community resident home, and to describe the characteristics of residents with protein-energy malnutrition (PEM). The participants were 261 people, 65 to 103 years of age (M= 84.8+/-7.1 in women, 82.5+/-6.4 in men) who during one year entered special types of housing for the elderly in a municipality in the south of Sweden. During the first two weeks after admission nutritional status was assessed using weight index, triceps skinfold thickness, arm muscle circumference, serum albumin and transthyretin. Demographic and sociomedical data and eating-related factors were collected by using structured interviews and studying residents records. PEM was found in 29% of the residents who entered municipal care from their own homes, 33% among those moving within municipal care and 43% of the residents who entered from hospital care. Pressure sores or leg ulcers, psychological stress or acute disease in the previous 3 months, reduced fluid intake, deteriorated appetite, reduced mobility, need of help during meals and gastrointestinal symptoms were factors associated with PEM.

  • 3.
    Christensson, Lennart
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unossoon, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Measurement of perceived health problems as a means of detecting elderly people at risk of malnutrition2003In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 7, no 4, p. 257-262Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND:

    As nutritional preventative measures are more effective in elderly people assessed as non protein-energy malnourished (non-PEM) than such interventions are in those who are malnourished, early detection of those at risk of malnutrition is important.

    OBJECTIVE:

    This study tests the hypothesis that health problems measured by the Nottingham Health Profile (NHP) can predict residents at risk of malnutrition.

    DESIGN:

    Nutritional status was assessed in 261 residents newly admitted to municipal care using a combination of anthropometry and serum protein measurements. From this sample, 20 non-PEM residents, simultaneously assessed as moderately malnourished according to a subjective method, were consecutively included. Using a paired matched design, 20 other non-PEM residents, who were simultaneously subjectively assessed as well nourished, completed the pairs.

    RESULTS:

    Univariate logistic regression analyses showed that the dimensions of emotional reactions, energy, pain, physical mobility and sleep had significant power to predict residents at risk of malnutrition. In the multiple logistic regression analysis, energy had the highest explanatory power.

    CONCLUSION:

    Non-PEM residents, assessed as moderately malnourished according to the Subjective Global Assessment, perceived significantly greater health problems than non-PEM residents subjectively assessed as well nourished. Measurement of health problems adds important information to that used in early detection of residents at risk of malnutrition.

  • 4.
    Dong, Huan-Ji
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Marcusson, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Wressle, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Geriatric Medicine in Linköping.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Obese very old women have low relative handgrip strength, poor physical function, and difficulty in daily living2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 20-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate how anthropometric and body composition variables, and handgrip strength (HS) affect physical function and independent daily living in 88-year-old Swedish women.

    Participants: A cross-sectional analysis of 83 community-dwelling women, who were 88 years old with normal weight (n=30), overweight (n=29), and obesity (n=24) in Linköping, Sweden, was performed.

    Measures: Assessments of body weight (Wt), height, waist circumference (WC), and arm circumference were performed by using an electronic scale and measuring tape. Tricep skinfold thickness was measured by a skinfold calliper. Fat mass (FM) and fat-free mass (FFM) were measured by bioelectrical impedance analysis, and HS was recorded with an electronic grip force instrument. Linear regression was used to determine the contributions of parameters as a single predictor or as a ratio with HS to physical function (Short Form-36, SF-36PF) and instrumental activities of daily living (IADL).

    Results: Obese women had greater absolute FM and FFM, and lower HS corrected for FFM and HS-based ratios (i.e., HS/Wt, HS/body mass index [BMI]) than their normal weight and overweight counterparts. After adjusting for physical activity levels and the number of chronic diseases, HS-based ratios explained more variance in SF-36PF scoring (R2: 0.52–0.54) than single anthropometric and body composition variables (R2: 0.45–0.51). WC, HS, and HS-based ratios (HS/Wt and HS/FFM) were also associated with the number of IADL with no difficulty.

    Conclusion: Obese very old women have a high WC, but their HS is relatively low in relation to their Wt and FFM. These parameters are better than BMI for predicting physical function and independent daily living.

  • 5.
    Ekdahl, A. W.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Odzakovic, Elzana
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    LIVING UNNOTICED: COGNITIVE IMPAIRMENT IN OLDER PEOPLE WITH MULTIMORBIDITY2016In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 275-279Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation between MMSE <= 23 and the presence of a diagnosis of dementia in the medical record in a population with multimorbidity. Design, setting, and participants: This cross-sectional study was part of the Ambulatory Geriatric Assessment - a Frailty Intervention Trial (AGe-FIT; N = 382). Participants were community dwelling, aged >= 75 years, had received inpatient hospital care at least three times during the past 12 months, and had three or more concomitant diagnoses according to the International Classification of Diseases, 10th revision. Measurements: The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) was administered at baseline. Medical records of participants with MMSE scores < 24 were examined for the presence of dementia diagnoses and two years ahead. Results: Fifty-three (16%) of 337 participants with a measure of MMSE had a MMSE scores < 24. Six of these 53 (11%) participants had diagnoses of dementia (vascular dementia, n = 4; unspecified dementia, n = 1; Alzheimers disease, n = 1) according to medical records; 89% did not. Conclusions: A MMSE-score < 24 is not well correlated to a diagnosis of dementia in the medical record in a population of elderly with multimorbidity. This could imply that cognitive decline and the diagnosis of dementia remain undetected in older people with multimorbidity. Proactive care of older people with multimorbidity should focus on cognitive decline to detect cognitive impairment and to provide necessary help and support to this very vulnerable group.

  • 6.
    Johansson, Peter
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Dahlström, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Alehagen, Urban
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Improved health-related quality of life, and more days out of hospital with supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 combined. Results from a double blind, placebo-controlled prospective study2015In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 19, no 9, p. 870-877Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The impact of supplementation with selenium and coenzyme Q10 (CoQ10) on health-care usage and health-related quality of life (Hr-QoL) in community-dwelling elderly people has, to our knowledge, not previously been investigated. To investigate the effect of 48 months supplementation with CoQ10 and selenium on community-dwelling elderly as regards: (I) the number of days out of hospital, and (II) the effect on Hr-QoL. A 48-month double-blind randomized placebo-controlled trial was carried out. A total of 443 participants were given CoQ10 and organic selenium yeast combined, or a placebo. All admissions to the Department of Internal Medicine or Cardiology were evaluated. Hr-QoL were measured with the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Cardiac Health Profile (CHP) and one item overall-quality of life (overall-QoL). A total of 206 participants were evaluated after 48 months. No changes were found in the number of days out of hospital or Hr-QoL. A sub-analysis of participants matched for age, gender and baseline cardiac wall tension as measured by NT-proBNP was performed. The mean number of days out of hospital was 1779 for those taking the active substance compared to 1533 for those taking the placebo (p=0.03). Those with active substance declined significantly less in the HR-QoL domains of physical role performance (p=0.001), vitality (p=0.001), physical component score (p=0.001), overall QoL (p=0.001), somatic dimension (p=0.001), conative dimension (p=0.001) and global function (p=0.001). In a match-group analysis selenium and CoQ10 increased the number of days out of hospital and slowed the deterioration in Hr-QoL.

  • 7.
    Lorefelt, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Wilhelmsson, Susan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nutritional status and health care costs for the elderly living in municipal residential homes — An intervention study2011In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 15, no 2, p. 92-97Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE:

    The aim was to study the effect of individualised meals on nutritional status among older people living in municipal residential homes and to compare the results with a control group. An additional aim was to estimate direct health care costs for both groups.

    SETTING:

    Six different municipal residential homes in the south-east of Sweden.

    PARTICIPANTS:

    Older people living in three residential homes constituted the intervention group n=42 and the rest constituted the control group n=67.

    INTERVENTION:

    A multifaceted intervention design was used. Based on an interview with staff a tailored education programme about nutritional care, including both theoretical and practical issues, was carried through to staff in the intervention group. Nutritional status among the elderly was measured by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), individualised meals were offered to the residents based on the results of the MNA. Staff in the control group only received education on how to measure MNA and the residents followed the usual meal routines.

    MEASUREMENTS:

    Nutritional status was measured by MNA at baseline and after 3 months. Cost data on health care visits during 2007 were collected from the Cost Per Patient database.

    RESULTS:

    Nutritional status improved and body weight increased after 3 months in the intervention group. Thus, primary health care costs constituted about 80% of the total median cost in the intervention group and about 55% in the control group.

    CONCLUSION:

    With improved knowledge the staff could offer the elderly more individualised meals. One of their future challenges is to recognise and assess nutritional status among this group. If malnutrition could be prevented health care costs should be reduced.

  • 8.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Wilhelmsson, Susan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A multifaceted intervention model can give a lasting improvement of older peoples nutritional status2012In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 16, no 4, p. 378-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this study was with a multifaceted intervention model improve the nutritional status of elderly people living in residential homes to increase their energy intake and to maintain improvements over time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThree different municipal residential homes in the south-east of Sweden. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe study population consisted of 67 elderly people. A within-subjects design was used which means that the participants were their own controls. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA multifaceted intervention model was chosen, which included education on both theoretical and practical issues, training and support for staff, and individualized snacks to the residents. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanNutritional status was measured by Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA), the consumption of food was recorded by the staff using a food record method for 3 consecutive days. The length of night-time fasting has been calculated from the food records. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanNutritional status improved after 3 months of intervention and was maintained after 9 months. Weight increased during the whole study period. Night-time fasting decreased but not to the recommended level. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThis study shows that it is possible by a multifaceted intervention model to increase energy intake including expanding snacks and thereby improve and maintain nutritional status over a longer period in the elderly living in residential homes. This result was possible to achieve because staff received education and training in nutritional issues and by provision of support during a period when new routines were introduced.

  • 9.
    Lorefält, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Wissing, Ulla
    Stockholm.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science.
    Smaller but energy and protein-enriched meals improve energy and nutrient intakes in elderly patients2005In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 243-247Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate if smaller but energy and protein enriched meals could improve energy and nutrient intakes in elderly geriatric patients. Ten patients, between 77 and 87 years of age were included in the study, performed at a Geriatric rehabilitation ward. The first week after inclusion, the patients were offered a three days' standard hospital menu and the second week, a three days' energy and protein-enriched menu. The consumption of food and the fluid intake were recorded using a pre-coded food record book during both the menus and analysed by the Swedish National Food Administration. The patients' energy requirements were calculated according to the Nordic Nutrition Recommendation for elderly subjects. When the standard hospital menu was offered, six patients had lower energy intake, -67 to -674 kcal/day, than the calculated energy requirements. The daily energy intake increased by 37 %, with the energy and protein-enriched menu compared with the standard hospital menu. Furthermore, the daily intake of protein, fat, carbohydrate, certain vitamins and minerals was significantly higher with the energy and protein-enriched menu compared with the standard hospital menu. Conclusion: This study showed that the intake of energy and nutrients increased with the energy and protein-enriched menu in elderly patients on a geriatric rehabilitation ward. © The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging 2005.

  • 10.
    Wissing, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ek, Anna-Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A follow-up study of ulcer healing, nutrition, and life-situation in elderly patients with leg ulcer2001In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 37-42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study was undertaken in order to follow up ulcer healing, ulcer recurrence, nutritional status and life-situation in elderly patients with leg ulcers. Of 70 patients assessed previously in 1996, 43 (61%) were still alive in 2000 and, of these, 38 (88%) participated in the follow-up. Rate of healing, recurrence and amputation were obtained from medical records and interviews with the patients. The Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA) was used to assess their nutritional status and the Philadelphia Geriatric Center Multilevel Assessment Instrument was used for assessment of their life-situation. Nineteen patients (50%), mean age 82+/-4.6 years, had healed ulcers. Two (5%) patients, mean age 86+/-2.8, had required amputation and had no ulceration after surgery. Seventeen patients (45%), mean age 80.3+/-6 years, had open ulcers, six had their original ulcers still unhealed, and 11 had open recurrent ulcers. Decreased mean MNA scores, as well as decreased mean scores in ADL and mobility, were seen over time in patients with open ulcers but not in those who were healed. Patients with healed ulcers had significantly higher mean scores in social interaction than those with open ulcers and significantly increased mean scores in environmental quality over time. The results indicate that nutrition and the life-situation might be related to leg ulcer healing. The nutritional situation and the whole life-situation should be observed and taken into consideration when care is planned. Additional research is needed to increase the understanding of the relationship between nutrition, life-situation and ulcer healing.

  • 11.
    Wleklik, Marta
    et al.
    Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Uchmanowicz, Izabella
    Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Jankovska-Polanska, Beata
    Wroclaw Medical University, Wroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    Andreae, Christina
    Wroclaw Medical UniversityWroclaw, Lower Silesia, Poland.
    The role of nutritional status in elderly patients with heart failure2017In: The Journal of Nutrition, Health & Aging, ISSN 1279-7707, E-ISSN 1760-4788, Vol. 22, no 5, p. 581-588Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Evidence indicates that malnutrition very frequently co-occurs with chronic heart failure (HF) and leads to a range of negative consequences. Studies show associations between malnutrition and wound healing disorders, an increased rate of postoperative complications, and mortality. In addition, considering the increasing age of patients with HF, a specific approach to their treatment is required. Guidelines proposed by the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) for treating acute and chronic HF refer to the need to monitor and prevent malnutrition in HF patients. However, the guidelines feature no strict nutritional recommendations for HF patients, who are at high nutritional risk as a group, nor do they offer any such recommendations for the poor nutritional status subgroup, for which high morbidity and mortality rates have been observed. In the context of multidisciplinary healthcare, recommended by the ESC and proven by research to offer multifaceted benefits, nutritional status should be systematically assessed in HF patients. Malnutrition has become a challenge within healthcare systems and day-to-day clinical practice, especially in developed countries, where it affects the course of disease and patients' prognosis.

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