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  • 1.
    Alexanderson, Kristina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    An assessment protocol for gender analysis of medical literature.2000In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 29, p. 81-98Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Janda, Carolyn
    et al.
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology , Philipps University , Marburg , Germany.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology , Philipps University , Marburg , Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Psychiatry Section, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kleinstäuber, Maria
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps University, Marburg, Germany.
    A symptom diary to assess severe premenstrual syndrome and premenstrual dysphoric disorder2017In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 57, no 7, p. 837-854Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The differentiation between premenstrual syndrome (PMS) and premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD) has been widely discussed. PMDD is listed as a mental disorder in the DSM-5, whereas PMS is not considered as a mental disorder in any diagnostic manual. Consequently, PMS is operationalized in different ways. Keeping a symptom diary is required to diagnose PMDD but is also recommended for PMS. The aim of our study was, therefore, to operationalize PMS and PMDD within a DSM-5-based symptom diary. We developed a symptom-intensity-score (SI-score) and an interference-score (INT-score) to evaluate the symptom diary. Ninety-eight women (aged 20-45 years) completed a symptom diary over two menstrual cycles, a retrospective screening for premenstrual symptoms, and answered additional impairment questionnaires from August 2013 to August 2015. The scores revealed moderate to good reliability (Cronbachs a = 0.83-0.96). Convergent validity was shown by significant correlations with a retrospective screening, the Pain Disability Index, and the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire. Discriminant validity was indicated by low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10. These scores may facilitate the evaluation of prospective symptom ratings in research and clinical practice. Future research should focus on continuing to validate the scores (e.g., in an ambulatory setting).

  • 3.
    Kaiser, Gudrun
    et al.
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Philipps Univ Marburg, Germany.
    Methods for coping with premenstrual change: Development and validation of the German Premenstrual Change Coping Inventory2018In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 58, no 9, p. 1062-1079Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the premenstrual phase, psychological and physiological changes can occur, which are associated with different levels of disability. When they appear with Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder (PMDD), different coping strategies may be used by women to deal with premenstrual changes. Currently no German measure exists for assessing premenstrual symptom-related coping strategies. Therefore, we developed the Premenstrual Change Coping Inventory (PMS-Cope). First, the 33-item questionnaire was tested with an exploratory factor analytic approach (EFA) in a sample of 150 women prospectively diagnosed with PMDD or severe Premenstrual Syndrome from August 2013 until March 2016. The EFA resulted in a 12-item scale with a two-factor structure: "seeking positive affect-inducing activities" and "seeking support"; Cronbach`s alpha of 0.73 and 0.71, respectively, demonstrated good reliability for both factors. Confirmatory factor analysis based on a second sample of 89 women conducted from May 2016 until June 2016 confirmed the two-factor structure. Additionally, a potential third factor "healthcare use behavior" was tested with an EFA. For the three-factor solution, satisfactory Cronbachs alpha values (0.70-0.72) were detected. The PMS-Cope was shown to be a valid, reliable, and economic measure. In future research, cross validations and confirmatory factor analyses with the three-factor solution should be conducted.

  • 4.
    Kues, Johanna N.
    et al.
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Kleinstaeuber, Maria
    University of Marburg, Germany.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. University of Marburg, Germany.
    How to measure the impact of premenstrual symptoms? Development and validation of the German PMS-Impact Questionnaire2016In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 56, no 7, p. 807-826Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    With 75% of women of reproductive age affected, premenstrual symptoms are very common, ranging from emotional and cognitive to physical symptoms. Premenstrual Syndrome and Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder can lead to substantial functional interference and psychological distress comparable to that of dysthymic disorders. The assessment of this impact is required as a part of the diagnostic procedure in the DSM-5. In the absence of a specific measure, the authors developed the PMS-Impact Questionnaire. A sample of 101 women reporting severe premenstrual complaints was assessed with the twenty-two items in the questionnaire during their premenstrual phase in an ongoing intervention study at the Philipps-University Marburg from August 2013 until January 2015. An exploratory factor analysis revealed a two-factor solution (labeled Psychological Impact and Functional Impact) with 18 items. A Cronbachs alpha of 0.90 for Psychological Impact and of 0.90 for Functional Impact indicated good reliability. Convergent construct validity was demonstrated by moderate to high correlations with the Pain Disability Index. Low correlations with the Big Five Inventory-10 indicated good divergent validity. The PMS-Impact Questionnaire was found to be a valid, reliable, and an economic measure to assess the impact of premenstrual symptoms. In future research, cross validations and confirmatory factor analyses should be conducted.

  • 5.
    Kues, Johanna N
    et al.
    Kues Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Janda, Carolyn
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Krzikalla, Clara
    Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Psychiatry Section, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Weise, Cornelia
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Division of Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy, Department of Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany.
    The effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the report of positive and negative premenstrual changes.2018In: Women & health, ISSN 0363-0242, E-ISSN 1541-0331, Vol. 58, no 1, p. 16-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although women predominantly report negative premenstrual changes, a substantial portion of women also reports positive changes. Little is known about factors related to report of positive and negative premenstrual changes. The aim of this experimental study at the Philipps-University of Marburg from January and February 2015 was to investigate the effect of manipulated information about premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of premenstrual changes. A total of 241 healthy women were randomly assigned either to an experimental group (EG) reading: (1) text focusing on negative and positive premenstrual changes (EG1 (+/-)); (2) text focusing on negative changes (EG2 (-)); or (3) control group (CG) text. At least one positive premenstrual change was reported by the majority of the participating women. The results of the MANOVA and discriminant analysis showed that, after having read the text, EG2 (-) reported more negative and fewer positive premenstrual changes in a retrospective screening compared to EG1 (+/-) and CG. No significant difference was observed between EG1 (+/-) and CG. The results show the negative influence of information focusing on negative premenstrual changes on the retrospective report of both negative and positive premenstrual changes.

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