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  • 1. arman, maria
    et al.
    Rehnsfeldt, Arne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies.
    The hidden suffering among breast cancer patients - a qualitative metasynthesis2003In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 510-527Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 2.
    Asbring, P.
    et al.
    Åsbring, P., Stockholm Center of Public Health, Department of Public Health Sciences, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity .
    Patient power and control: A study of women with uncertain illness trajectories2004In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 226-240Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The authors interviewed 12 women diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome and 13 with fibromyalgia with the aim of determining the strategies they perceive themselves as using to gain control over their situation during the health care process. The results highlight various strategies that the women report applying to find a way of managing the illness and to influence caregivers. They describe, for example, how they try to gain control over their situation by acquiring knowledge about the illness. The women also describe various power strategies they use in their interaction with the caregivers to take command of their situation, namely exiting, noncompliance, confrontation, persuasion/insistence, making demands, and demonstrative distancing. © 2004 Sage Publications.

  • 3.
    Bielsten, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lasrado, Reena
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Keady, John
    Univ Manchester, England.
    Kullberg, Agneta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in East Östergötland.
    Living Life and Doing Things Together: Collaborative Research With Couples Where One Partner Has a Diagnosis of Dementia2018In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 28, no 11, p. 1719-1734Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to identify relevant content for a self-management guide by using the outcomes of previous research in combination with knowledge and experiences from couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia. The study was carried out in three phases: (a) literature search of previous research related to well-being and couplehood in dementia; (b) interviews with couples with dementia based on the findings of the literature search; and (c) further authentication of the findings within expert groups of people with dementia and carers. For analysis of data, we used a hybrid approach of thematic analysis with combined deductive and inductive approaches. The findings of this study indicated that the four main themes Home and Neighborhood, Meaningful Activities and Relationships, Approach and Empowerment, and Couplehood with related subthemes could be appropriate targets for a self-management guide for couples where one partner has a diagnosis of dementia.

  • 4.
    Carlander, Ida
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Ternestedt, Britt-Marie
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Sahlberg-Blom, Eva
    Örebro University, Örebro, Sweden.
    Hellström, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandberg, Jonas
    Ersta Sköndal University College, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Being Me and Being Us in a Family Living Close to Death at Home2011In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 21, no 5, p. 683-695Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We used interpretive description to describe how everyday life close to death was experienced and dealt with in families with one member who had a life-threatening illness. We performed 28 individual, couple, and group interviews with five families. We found two patterns, namely, “being me in a family living close to death” and “being us in a family living close to death.” “Being me” meant that every individual in the family had to deal with the impending death, regardless of whether or not he or she was the person with the life-threatening illness. This was linked to ways of promoting the individual’s self-image, or “me-ness.” This pattern was present at the same time as the pattern of “being us,” or in other words, being a family, and dealing with impending death and a new “we-ness” as a group. “Striving for the optimal way of living close to death” was the core theme.

  • 5. Fredelius, G
    et al.
    Sandell, Rolf
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Lindqvist, C
    Who should receive subsidized psychotherapy?: Analysis of decision makers' think-aloud protocols2002In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 640-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three groups of judges representing clinical, political, and laypersons' perspectives were given the task of prioritizing patients for subsidized psychotherapy within the Swedish health care system. The authors documented the judges' decision-making processes in think-aloud protocols and analyzed them qualitatively, focusing on the conflict between the urgency of a case and its suitability for treatment. In an earlier statistical analysis of the same material, clinicians had seemed to pay more attention to suitability criteria, whereas health care officials and laypersons prioritized based oil urgency. The qualitative findings confirmed the centrality of this conflict and contributed to a deeper understanding of decision makers' ways of coping with it. Their conceptions of suitability and urgency were also elucidated by analysis of the think-aloud protocols.

  • 6.
    Klaeson, Kicki
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandell, Kerstin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Berterö, Carina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Losing the Elixir of Life: Sexuality in the Context of Prostate Cancer Narratives2012In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 22, no 9, p. 1184-1194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this phenomenological paper we explored how men diagnosed with prostate cancer experienced their sexuality from a lifeworld perspective. One essential meaning was identified: “having the elixir of life stolen”. This essential meaning had four constituents: “something that no longer exists”, “the threat to manhood”, “intimacy” and “staged manhood”. The lifeworld for these men comprised the dynamic interaction between being deprived of their “life’s elixir” and their ability to have and experience intimacy. The men were preoccupied with embodied experiences unfamiliar to them. They mourned the loss of sexuality in connection with their new life situation which threatened their identity. Their female partner was a great support, and with her the man could picture himself and at best renegotiate his sexuality. In the future, cancer care should be organized so as to enable all aspects of sexuality to be acknowledged and discussed.

  • 7.
    Marie, Ockander
    et al.
    IHS Linköpings universitet.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Society, Diversity, Identity .
    Comments on the Brad Triology2001In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 725-727Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

       

  • 8.
    Ockander, Marlene
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Östlund, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Comments on the Brad trilogy2001In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 725-727p. 725-727Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reflections on deconstructing Harry or when is good art bad science?

  • 9.
    Rytterström, Partrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Arman, Maria
    Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Division of Nursing, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Unosson, Mitra
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Care culture as a meaning-making process: a study of a mistreatment investigation2013In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 23, no 9, p. 1179-1187Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Culture might offer significant insights into the circumstances under which mistreatment occurs. Our aim with this study was to understand and explore institutional mistreatment from a care culture perspective. We used a case study with a triangulating methodology. It involved 12 individual interviews, one focus group interview with four people, a 2-day field study, and a document study. The case was a mistreatment situation that had occurred in municipal care, in which residents had been locked in their rooms at night. Two different care cultures were identified that could give a richer contextual understanding of the motives behind the institutional mistreatment. The service culture was need-oriented and emphasized freedom in care provision. The motherhood culture was characterized by protection and safeguarding of the vulnerable residents. Both cultures showed traces of caring values, but when important caring values were absent, this created a seedbed for mistreatment.

  • 10.
    Stanton, Josephine
    et al.
    Auckland City Hospital, New Zealand.
    Lahdenperä, Viktor
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Divison of Neurobiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Braun, Virginia
    University of Auckland, New Zealand.
    Referral to an Acute Child and Adolescent Inpatient Unit: The Experiences and Views of Community Mental Health Referrers2017In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 27, no 11, p. 1664-1674Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Admission to an acute mental health inpatient unit is a significant event for a young person. The interface between inpatient and community teams negotiating the admission and later discharge can be fraught. To understand how to improve the transition between inpatient and community care, we interviewed 48 community clinicians about their experiences of engaging with an acute child and adolescent mental health inpatient unit. Through thematic analysis, we identified management of risk was a central issue. Participants wanted more time in hospital, and more communication and collaboration. They expressed appreciation, but some gave intense descriptions of dissatisfaction. The analysis suggests avenues to improve communication and experience, recognizing the (felt) power differential between inpatient and referring community clinicians. Managing the power dynamics requires inpatient clinicians to use active inquiry to bring forward community clinicians views and be mindful of the risk of community clinicians experiencing communication as criticism.

  • 11. Tishelman, Carol
    et al.
    Forss, Anette
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Lundgren, Eva-Lisa
    Widmark, Catarina
    Tornberg, Sven
    Research on Risk and Risk in Research: Theoretical and Practical Experiences From a Multidisciplinary Study on Cervix Cancer Screening in Urban Sweden1999In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 9, no 1, p. 45-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12. Tishelman, Carol
    et al.
    Sachs, Lisbeth
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    The diagnostic process and the boundaries of normality1998In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 8, no 1, p. 48-60Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Wiggins, Sally
    et al.
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    McQuade, Robert
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Rasmussen, Susan
    University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, United Kingdom.
    Stepping back from crisis points: The provision and acknowledgement of support in an online suicide discussion forum.2016In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 26, no 9, p. 1240-1251Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Suicide is a global health concern, though little is known about the social practices that might support those who are contemplating suicide. Online forums provide a unique insight into the anonymous discussion of suicide, including sociocultural norms about suicide and the delicate management of online interaction. In this article, we examine the provision and acknowledgment of support in an online discussion forum about suicide, using discursive psychology to analyze the textual interaction. The analysis illustrates how forum threads function as case studies and enable members to gain support on numerous occasions. In this way, members can gain help at crisis points as and when these occur, while still maintaining authenticity as a valid forum member. The analysis also provides additional evidence for models of suicide which highlight the fluid nature of suicidality and contributes to the preventative work on suicide by demonstrating how support can be provided at crisis points.

  • 14.
    Åsbring, Pia
    et al.
    Centre for Development of Health Services, Department of Public Health Sciences at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden.
    Närvänen, Anna-Liisa
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies. Linköping University, NISAL - National Institute for the Study of Ageing and Later Life.
    Women's experiences of stigma in relation to chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia2002In: Qualitative Health Research, ISSN 1049-7323, E-ISSN 1552-7557, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 148-160Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia are characterized by being difficidt to diagnose and having an elusive etiology and no clear-cut treatment strategy. The question of whether these illnesses are stigmatizing was investigated through interviews with 25 women with these illnesses. The women experienced stigmatization primarily before receiving a diagnosis, and the diffuse symptomatology associated with the illnesses were significant for stigmatization. Stigma consisted of questioning the veracity, morality, and accuracy of patient symptom descriptions and of psychologizing symptoms. Coping with stigma was also explored and found to comprise both withdrawal and approach strategies, depending on the individual's circumstances and goals.

1 - 14 of 14
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