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  • 1.
    Areschoug, Judith
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences.
    Att skriva problembarnens historia2004In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Engstrand, Åsa-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Business Administration. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society.
    En öppen affär: Konsumenten och den handelsarbetande i ett intersektionellt perspektiv2010In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 76, no 1, p. 129-156Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of the article is to analyse what new insights into the twentieth-century debate on retail opening hours an intersectional perspective with a discourse analysis can offer us. In focus is the use of categorisations in the meeting between people, and the reduction of the complexity this entails. An analysis of intersectionality amounts to a problematisation of this practice and its consequences. The sociologist Leslie McCall points out that there has been surprisingly little discussion of how to go about an intersectional study of a phenomenon, and argues that different methods produce different kinds of knowledge.

    The source material used here consists of official publications in the form of official inquiry reports and parliamentary reports. By using anticategorical complexity, and the term social divisions in particular, predefined interpretations in the study of constructions of gender, class, and ethnicity are avoided, while taking a conflict perspective on the debate makes possible an analysis of the discursive struggle between free and regulated opening hours. With the help of intersectionality, two social positions are identified, consumers and retail workers, along with the social divisions that were used in their creation - indeed, it is by means of such creations that political change comes about. The long historical perspective reveals that many divisions can be important, and that the categorizations are continuously changing.

    It is at the point of intersection between the social divisions constituted by gender (woman), sexuality (housewife, married woman), parenthood (mother), family, and space (Stockholm, the household) that the position occupied by consumers who need liberal opening hours is created. Age too plays a role, given that consumers need to consume at a specific period in their lives (mothers who have both waged work and small children). The position occupied by retail worker is for its part defined by divisions such as gender (man, woman), family (woman unable to work far from home), sexuality (parent, housewife), and age (parent with young children or schoolchildren).

    The study shows that the same divisions are used over time, but they are used in different ways according to the discourse of which they are part or the position in question. It also shows that divisions and categorizations can act both inclusively and exclusively, depending on the period and whichever discourse happens to be in the ascendant. The retail workers were thus prioritized when the regulation discourse was hegemonic, whereas consumers were privileged once the discourse of liberal opening hours had taken over. Divisions and categorizations are always the objects of renegotiation, however; open deals indeed.

  • 3.
    Förhammar, Staffan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History.
    Organiserad filantropi i Sverige under 1800-taleta senare del: exemplet hjälp till handikappade1995In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, no 2, p. 159-196Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Förhammar, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recension av Anders Berge, Sjukvårdens underklass: Sjukvården i den kommunala fattigvården 1910-19502008In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 74, no 2, p. 152-153Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Henry Nygård, Bara ett ringa obehag? Avfall och renhållning i de finländska städernas profylaktiska strategier 1830-19302005In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 71, no 2, p. 305-307Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kylhammar, Martin
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of Culture Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Debate: Torsten Fogelqvist, Dagens Nyheter and the method of intellectual biography2007In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 73, no 3, p. 113-128Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The attraction of writing biography for me has always been that it so clearly demands analysis of the fields of action and discourse, the boundaries between these fields and their variation over time. There is, of course, always a limit to what may be said or done at any given moment. There are restrictive factors of which the good biographer must always be aware, and which are, from the existentialist point of view, instructive not only for the biographer but hopefully for his readers as well: that is, how the subject has made use of his limited scope of action. Within that field of action and discourse the subject has wrestled with strong and persistent dilemmas that the biographer must possess the imagination and power of insight to distinguish among all other relevant and time-specific events. In this way, a biography deals with man's struggle with and against structures he does not fully control. The amateur biographer's most common characteristic is that he writes his biography because he loves or dislikes his object. This means that he lacks ambitions of historical theory and believes that writing a biography is about handing out medals or red cards. The good biographer, on the other hand, I argue, looks at the subject as an empirical example that can be used to solve a problem or answer a question. The subject thus becomes a prism which reflects a more general historical dilemma. In a biography it is not the subject's, but the biographer's voice I primarily want to hear. This line of argument will not be developed further here, but may be studied further in my book Den tidlose modernisten (in French, Le moderniste atemporel, Paris, 2008) where questions of this kind are discussed in theoretical and practical terms. This article sheds light on the advantages of such a problem-oriented and interdisciplinary biography writing with the help of a concrete example - Ingmar Lundquist's fine dissertation Kulturposten: Torsten Fogelqvist som DN-publicist och folkbildare (Stockholm,2005). [The cultural dean: Torsten Fogelqvist as a publicist for the newspaper Dagens Nyheter and as a general educater].

  • 7.
    Lind, Judith
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute.
    Att skriva problembarnens historia2004In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 8.
    Lind, Judith
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recension av "I problembarnens tid : förnuftets moraliska ordning"2004In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 70, no 1, p. 133-164Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Lindgren, Anne-Li
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Stat och kommuner. Kollektiv och enskilda. 1930-talets skyddshemsdebatt och folkhemspolitiken2001In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 67, no 2, p. 239-267Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Lindgren, Cecilia
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recension: Att plantera ett barn. Internationella adoptioner och assisterad befruktning i svensk reproduktionspolitik2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 149-151Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Lindström, Dag
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History.
    Från lokal konfliktlösare till administrativ stab. Råd och kämnärsrätt i Karlstad under 1600-talet2003In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 69, no 1Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 12.
    Ludvigsson, David
    Historiska institutionen, Uppsala universitet, Uppsala.
    Historien är nu. En introduktion till historiedidaktiken2005In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 72, no 2, p. 290-292Article, book review (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 13.
    Ludvigsson, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nordgren, Kenneth
    Karlstads universitet, Karlstad, Sweden.
    Karlsson, Klas-Göran
    Lunds universitet, Luleå, Sweden.
    Ahonen, Sirkka
    Helsingfors universitet, Helsingfors, Finland.
    Kvande, Lise
    Norges teknisk-naturvitenskapelige universitet, Trondheim, Norge.
    Nielsen, Carsten Tage
    Roskilde universitet, Roskilde, Danmark.
    Rundabordsdiskussion: Var står historiedidaktiken idag?: Ett rundabordssamtal fört i samband med den Nionde årliga konferensen inom det nationella nätverket för historiedidaktik, Karlstads universitet den 28 april 20152015In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 81, no 2, p. 14-35Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [sv]

    Diskussion om den historiedidaktiska forskningens tillstånd ur ett nordiskt perspektiv. Historiedidaktikens styrkor och svagheter berörs, liksom en analys av metodologiska och teoretiska utmaningar.

  • 14.
    Nyblom, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jarlbrink, Johan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aviatik och journalistik: Andreas Nyblom, ”Aviatik och journalistik: Flygbaronen2012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 13-39Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the first years of the twentieth century, numerous attempts were made at powered flight. What is commonly labelled 'the pioneer era' (1900-1914) covers the unsteady beginnings of the motorized airplane as well as its large-scale introduction in warfare and for the transportation of goods and passengers. Initially regarded as a foolish toy for hazardous adventure, the airplane rapidly became a favoured symbol of modernity, and the engineers, pilots, and entrepreneurs involved were celebrated as the heroes of progress. However, the quick change in opinion regarding the use and benefit of airplanes was not only prompted by the technical skill of the inventors or the bravery of the flyers. The aim of this paper is to shed light on the media history of early aviation, including the celebrity pilot as an important means by which aviation was publicly experienced and popularized. Through a case study of the mediatization of the first Swedish aviator, Carl Cederstrom (1867-1918), the article explores the interplay of the press, other kinds of media, and advertising in the introduction of the motorized airplane in Sweden in around 1910. At this time, air shows and competitions were being arranged all over the world. The media coverage was massive, and the aviators were frequently interviewed and celebrated. The press, however, did not only report on the events. By offering prizes and arranging competitions, individual newspapers played an active role in the introduction of powered flight. When the Stockholm Air Show was held in 1910 and 1911, one of the Stockholm dailies, Dagens Nyheter, was among the main organizers. The relation between the air show and the press coverage can be interpreted in terms of a feedback loop: the reporting drew attention to the show; the show became a mass attraction; and the papers reported it even more. At the centre of attention was always the aviator Cederstrom himself, popularly known as 'The Flying Baron'. The status of this persona and the participation of the press, the cinema, and postcard publishers also made the air shows attractive for sponsors such as champagne houses, patent medicine companies, and manufacturers of fire equipment. It was this joint attention that quickly transformed a limited concern into national awareness. When the Swedish armed forces in 1912 sought funding for its first aircraft, the politicians were easily convinced of the benefits of aviation.

  • 15.
    Petersson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Quality Technology and Management. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The commons and the state of representation, influence, and the legislative process2013In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 79, no 2, p. 154-155Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Sköld, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ingrid, Söderlind
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Finska barn i svenska hem: Om mobiliseringen av familjer att ta emot främmande barn under andra världskriget2016In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 35-65Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the Second World War, some 70,000 Finnish children were evacuated to Sweden. Most of the children were placed in foster care, although a large number of temporary children’s homes were also opened in response to the influx. This mass evacuation would not have been possible without the support of the Swedish public. This article highlights how families rallied to invite Finnish children into their homes, almost always without any financial reward, and considers the reasons, including altruism and a sense of duty, that prompted them to welcome foreign children.

    Drawing on archival material from the two organizations in charge of the evacuations (Centrala Finlandshjälpen during the Winter War and Hjälpkommittén för Finlands barn during the Continuation War) and from two newspapers, the study shows that existing local associations had a significant impact on the rapid recruitment of foster parents and the placement of a very large number of children. The study demonstrates that individuals could recruit large numbers of fosterers in small towns and villages, which suggests the significance of neighbours and social pressure. However, the willingness to accept Finnish children should not be understood as an expression of boundless solidarity, for where the literature on the Second World War tends to highlight Sweden’s sense of solidarity linked to notions of ethnicity, which led it to adopt relatively generous refugee policies towards its Nordic neighbours, we find that the solidarity shown Finnish children was conditional.

    Swedes’ solidarity and altruism were governed by their own needs as much as their impression of the recipients’ needs, as evidenced by applications where the children’s age and sex were mentioned. Girls were in greater demand than boys; younger children in far greater demand than adolescents. Moreover, solidarity was founded on notions of a close relationship, be it a common professional background with the children’s parents, membership of similar associations (sport clubs, for example), or a common religious background. Ultimately, solidarity and altruism were considered to be somewhat fragile—it was thought that too much control of foster homes would risk people’s willingness to help.

    All this raises the questions of the nature of volunteer work, solidarity, and altruism. How voluntary is voluntary work if it is guided by duty? Can altruists act in solidarity, and at the same time satisfy their own interests?

  • 17.
    Söderlind, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Social Work. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    The baby time. Perspective on children in history2017In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 83, no 2, p. 124-126Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Ullgren, Peter
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Recension av Jonas Nordins bok: Versailles, Slottet, parken, livet, Norstedts 20132014In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 141-142Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 19.
    Zetterqvist Nelson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Från samhällets barn till egna individer: Barnpsykiatrisk behandlingsideologi 1945-19852012In: Scandia, ISSN 0036-5483, Vol. 78, no 2, p. 40-67Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article the changing development of treatment ideology and policy in Swedish child psychiatry for the period 1945 to 1985 is discussed. Psychoanalytical ideas had been a source of inspiration in the development of municipal child guidance services in the interwar period. From 1945 and onwards Swedish child psychiatric clinics were introduced as a part of the medical health services within the realm of the county councils. The aim of this article is to examine the role played by psychoanalytic and psychodynamic thinking in this development of Swedish child psychiatry as a medical specialty. A rhetorical analysis of official government reports and policy documents dealing with the child psychiatric services in Sweden has been carried out. The analysis has specifically focused intellectual knowledge traditions underpinning the evolving treatment ideologies, including ways of defining problematic children and diagnostic categories. When mental health services for children were introduced in the mid-1940s, psychoanalytic thinking was intertwined with the social democratic vision of the future Swedish welfare state in which children were symbolizing the future. In practice, however, treatment ideas during the first years were on the whole sparse and psychiatric treatment for children was not yet developed in this context. The child guidance tradition of testing children and guiding parents appeared to be the usual way of addressing parents and children. From the early 1960s, child psychiatric services expanded and the number of units increased immensely. By now a treatment ideology based on psychodynamic theories began to evolve and child therapy became more and more common treatment approach. In the 1970s this treatment ideology actually gained hegemonic status, only challenged by family therapy ideas.  The conclusion is that psychoanalytical ideas have been influential for child psychiatry as an institutional practice for the whole period of time. Even if psychoanalysis was less influential in treatment arenas in the beginning years, the way it was intertwined with political visions of welfare and health care for all children, paved the way for the coming years development psychodynamic treatment ideology. The treatment ideological development however led to a change in how children were perceived. In the first decades of child psychiatry children were defined as society's children, a notion which emphasized social factors as critical to children's well-being and mental health. The coming decades the image of the child changed and was increasingly individualized and children's mental health became rhetorically more and more tied to relational circumstances in early childhood.

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