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  • 1.
    Erlingsson, Gissur
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Centre for Municipality Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Ödalen, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Political Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wångmar, Erik
    Linnaeus University, Sweden.
    Understanding Large-Scale Institutional Change: Social Conflicts and the Politics of Swedish Municipal Amalgamations 1952-19742015In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 40, no 2, p. 195-214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A remarkable reform in modern Swedish political history was the transformation of the local government structure between 1952 and 1974. In a mere 22 years, the number of municipalities was reduced from 2,498 to 277. This study aims to answer how such large-scale reforms could come about politically, particularly since much of the literature on institutions and political reform asserts that carrying out large-scale political change should be a difficult task. Two opposing stories of institutional change are presented: evolutionary accounts, which see the amalgamations as rational adaptations to changing circumstances, are contrasted with a social conflict perspective, which explains amalgamations in terms of their distributional consequences. By investigating the processes leading up to this vast restructuring of Swedish local political geography, we demonstrate that an understanding of these reforms as rational adaptations to changing circumstances, made on the basis of consensus among leading political actors, is not accurate. The reforms were not as uncontroversial and non-conflictual as they often have been portrayed. Our results weaken the evolutionary approach to institutional change, whilst supporting the social conflict perspective.

  • 2.
    Förhammar, Staffan
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    SCIENTIFIC PHILANTHROPY AND WELFARE POLITICS OF SOLIDARITY: A discussion of the roots of the Swedish welfare state2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 110-131Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    So far, studies of Swedish 20th-century social policy have emphasized the differences between the voluntary aid common around 1900 and the solidarity of welfare policy at mid-century. Means tests have been described as central instruments in the voluntary social work, while the welfare state was built on general principles of care. The question is, however, if the differences between the earlier and later forms of social policy can be characterized in such simple terms. A comparison has been made of departure points found in the social policies of the two periods. The results confirm that a significantly new way of thinking had taken shape in the years around the Second World War, but the study also shows that that the ideas concerning the welfare state contain threads that can be traced back to the scientific philanthropy of a few years earlier. The idea of social engineering was nothing new, and the idea that rights could be exchanged for duties had still not been deserted in the 1940s. In conclusion it can be said that the welfare state and the welfare politics of solidarity in several respects were built upon the principles of care that were formulated in about 1900.

  • 3.
    Grip, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Nilsson, Hans
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History, Tourism and Media. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    PERSPECTIVES ON THE RISE AND FALL OF SWEDISH CARDIAC EPIDEMICS: The cases of Linköping and Norrköping2016In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 41, no 1, p. 32-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Morbidity and mortality in cardiovascular diseases (CVD) can be described as an ongoing epidemic, although a very protracted one, lasting more than 100 years. Cardiovascular diseasesstill top mortality rates in the world today, accounting for about 30% of all deaths around the globe. But it is in the industrialized world that CVD dominate, although differences are great among various regions. Myocardial infarctions are significantly more common in Sweden than in southern Europe, but less common than in Eastern Europe. The overall question concerns the consequences for health in areas on the road to a post-industrial society. Over the years a clearer link has become visible between lifestyle and health. In Sweden, infectious diseases diminished as result of rising living standards. At the same time cardiovascular diseases were beginning their upward phase, reaching a peak in the 1960s. Deaths due to CVD bring to light significant discrepancies related to socio-economic and cultural factors. A comparison of the Swedish twin cities Linkoping and Norrkoping show considerable differences in death rates in favour of Linkoping, amounting to about 30% fewer in the 1920s with a tendency toward rising differences thereafter. A preliminary investigation of diagnoses has shown that links commonly made between health and socio-economic patterns need revision. The differences in cardiovascular morbidity show another pattern than was expected. It is obvious that the neighbourhood environments themselves have significance, and that the inequalities need additional research based on complementary explanatory models.

  • 4.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Kaivot ja käymälät - A Brief History of Wells and Toilets: the Case of Finland, Petri S. Juuti & Katri J. Wallenius2007In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 32, no 3, p. 312-314Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Hallström, Jonas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Educational Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Educational Science (IUV).
    Petri S. Juuti & Tapio S. Katko (Eds): From a Few to All2006In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 81-83Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 6.
    Kaijser, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Tema Environmental Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Centre for Climate Science and Policy Research, CSPR.
    Larsson Heidenblad, David
    Department of History, Lund University, Lund, Sweden.
    Young activists in muddy boots: Fältbiologerna and the ecological turn in Sweden, 1959–19742018In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 301-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish youth organization Fältbiologerna was founded in 1947 with the mission to inspire learning about nature through outdoor activities. Since then, the members have stayed true to their slogan ‘keep your boots muddy’ through engaging in bird watching and forest excursions; however, in the late 1960s and early 1970s – a period that environmental historians refer to as the ‘ecological turn’ – the organization’s activities were extended to also include political activism. Fältbiologerna increasingly evolved into a fertile terrain for young environmentalists. In this article, we explore how this Swedish branch of modern environmental youth activism came about. Based on a close reading of the members’ journal, Fältbiologen,between 1959 and 1974, we identify four key characteristics that were communicated in the journal during the years of study: adventurous, knowledgeable, influential, and radical. We demonstrate that Fältbiologerna took an increasingly radical position and began to engage in environmental debates and actions, while still holding on to ideals of learning through spending time in nature. Participation in these different activities shaped the young members into environmentalists.

  • 7.
    Nelson, Marie C
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History.
    Rogers, John
    Department of History Uppsala University.
    Cleaning up the cities: The first comprehensive public health law in Sweden1994In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 17-39Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8.
    Petersson, Erik
    Linköping University, Department for Studies of Social Change and Culture, Department of History. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Wounded Veterans and the State: The precursor of the veteran’s home in Sweden (1560–1650)2014In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 185-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this article is to explain the prehistory of the veteran’s home in Sweden. In the 16th century the Swedish army was reorganized and conscripted soldiers became an important part of the army. The conscripted soldiers were peasants, and in 1620 King Gustavus Adolphus reorganized the army so that the peasantry became the major source of soldiers to the army. The system was quite different from others in Europe, most countries having armies based on mercenaries. In 1622, the king started a fund for wounded soldiers and launched a plan for a veteran’s home in the old monastery buildings in Vadstena, which was opened in the years around 1640. The fund and the plans for the veteran’s home can thus be said to have come from the fact that the Swedish king raised his army from the peasants, and this in turn meant that he had a stronger responsibility for them than other kings in Europe. The wounded soldiers therefore became a category of the poor that society thought were qualified for help in 17th-century Sweden.

  • 9.
    Sköld, Johanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sandin, Bengt
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Schiratzki, Johanna
    Ersta Sköndal Bräcke University College.
    Historical Justice through Redress Schemes?: The practice of interpreting the law and physical child abuse in Sweden2018In: Scandinavian Journal of History, ISSN 0346-8755, E-ISSN 1502-7716, p. 1-24Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Redress Scheme intended for victims of historical child abuse inout-of-home care compensated only 46 % of claimants who sought economic compensation for past harms. This article explores the reasons behind this comparatively low validation rate by investigating a) how the eligibilitycriteria of the Redress Act were evaluated by the Redress Board, and b) the justifications and underlying values used when applications were rejected with reference to that the reported abuse was not deemed to be sufficiently severe according to past standards. Victim capital, which determines how vulnerable or credible a victim is perceived to be by others, as well as competence and narration are essential aspects for this type of legal proceeding. The article demonstrates that the claimants had to traverse a complicated web of criteriato be awarded compensation. The outcomes for claimants were affected by how the past was conceptualised in this legal setting, what competences the victims themselves possessed, what competence and resources the administrative system offered, and to the extent to which the decision-making process fragmented victims’ narratives.

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