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  • 1.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    et al.
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Qatar Orthoped & Sports Med Hosp, Sports Med Dept, Aspetar, Doha, Qatar.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Aker Solut, Lysaker, Norway.
    Kajenienne, Alma
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Med & Antidoping Commiss, Monaco, Monaco; Lithuanian Univ Hlth Sci, Inst Sport, Kaunas, Lithuania.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Spreco, Armin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Edouard, Pascal
    Univ Hosp St Etienne, Fac Med, Sports Med Unity, Dept Clin & Exercise Physiol, St Etienne, France; Univ Lyon, Exercise Physiol Lab, LPE EA 4338, St Etienne, France; French Athlet Federat, Med Commiss, Paris, France.
    Preparticipation injury complaint is a risk factor for injury: a prospective study of the Moscow 2013 IAAF Championships.2015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 17, p. 1118-U45Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: To determine the health status of athletes before the start of an international athletics championship and to determine whether preparticipation risk factors predicted in-championship injuries.

    METHODS: At the beginning of the 2013 International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) World Championships, all registered athletes (n=1784) were invited to complete a preparticipation health questionnaire (PHQ) on health status during the month preceding the championships. New injuries that occurred at the championships were prospectively recorded.

    RESULTS: The PHQ was completed by 698 (39%) athletes; 204 (29.2%) reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships. The most common mode of onset of preparticipation injury complaints was gradual (43.6%). Forty-nine athletes in the study reported at least one injury during the championships. Athletes who reported a preparticipation injury complaint were at twofold increased risk for an in-championship injury (OR=2.09; 95% CI 1.16 to 3.77); p=0.014). Those who reported a preparticipation gradual-onset injury complaint were at an almost fourfold increased risk for an in-championship time-loss injury (OR=3.92; 95% CI 1.69 to 9.08); p=0.001). Importantly, the preparticipation injury complaint severity score was associated with the risk of sustaining an in-championship injury (OR=1.14; 95% CI 1.06 to 1.22); p=0.001).

    SUMMARY AND CONCLUSIONS: About one-third of the athletes participating in the study reported an injury complaint during the month before the championships, which represented a risk factor for sustaining an injury during the championship. This study emphasises the importance of the PHQ as a screening tool to identify athletes at risk of injuries before international championships.

  • 2.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Editorial Material: Systematic review hacks for the sports and exercise clinician: five essential methodological elements in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 8, pp 447-4492016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 8, p. 447-449Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Serving the clinician and the patient: three ways that quality clinical guidelines can build on expert consensus statements and systematic reviews2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 557-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    Bahr, Roald
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway.
    Editorial Material: It is time for consensus on return to play after injury: five key questions in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 9, pp 506-5082016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 506-508Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 5.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Ekas, Guri Ranum
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Grindem, Hege
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Moksnes, Havard
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Anderson, Allen F.
    Tennessee Orthopaed Alliance, TN USA.
    Chotel, Franck
    Hop Femme Mere Enfant, France.
    Cohen, Moises
    Univ Fed Sao Paulo, Brazil.
    Forssblad, Magnus
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Ganley, Theodore J.
    Childrens Hosp Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA.
    Feller, Julian A.
    Epworth Healthcare, Australia; La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Univ Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Kocher, Minider S.
    Boston Childrens Hosp, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA USA.
    LaPrade, Robert F.
    Steadman Philippon Res Inst, CO USA; Steadman Clin, CO USA.
    McNamee, Michael
    Swansea Univ, Wales.
    Mandelbaum, Bert
    Santa Monica Orthopaed and Sports Med Grp, CA USA.
    Micheli, Lyle
    Boston Childrens Hosp, MA USA; Harvard Med Sch, MA USA; Micheli Ctr Sports Injury Prevent, MA USA.
    Mohtadi, Nicholas
    Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Reider, Bruce
    Univ Chicago, IL 60637 USA.
    Roe, Justin
    North Sydney Orthopaed and Sports Med Ctr, Australia.
    Seil, Romain
    Ctr Hosp Luxembourg, Luxembourg; Luxembourg Inst Hlth, Luxembourg.
    Siebold, Rainer
    Ruprecht Karls Univ Heidelberg, Germany; ATOS Klin, Germany.
    Silvers-Granelli, Holly J.
    FIFA Med Ctr Excellence Veloc Phys Therapy, CA USA.
    Soligard, Torbjorn
    Int Olymp Comm, Switzerland; Univ Calgary, Canada.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    Univ Ghent, Belgium.
    Engebretsen, Lars
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway; Int Olymp Comm, Switzerland.
    2018 International Olympic Committee consensus statement on prevention, diagnosis and management of paediatric anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 422-438Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In October 2017, the International Olympic Committee hosted an international expert group of physiotherapists and orthopaedic surgeons who specialise in treating and researching paediatric ACL injuries. Representatives from the American Orthopaedic Society for Sports Medicine, European Paediatric Orthopaedic Society, European Society for Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery amp; Arthroscopy, International Society of Arthroscopy Knee Surgery and Orthopaedic Sports Medicine, Pediatric Orthopaedic Society of North America and Sociedad Latinoamericana de Artroscopia, Rodilla y Deporte attended. Physiotherapists and orthopaedic surgeons with clinical and research experience in the field, and an ethics expert with substantial experience in the area of sports injuries also participated. Injury management is challenging in the current landscape of clinical uncertainty and limited scientific knowledge. Injury management decisions also occur against the backdrop of the complexity of shared decision-making with children and the potential long-term ramifications of the injury. This consensus statement addresses six fundamental clinical questions regarding the prevention, diagnosis and management of paediatric ACL injuries. The aim of this consensus statement is to provide a comprehensive, evidence-informed summary to support the clinician, and help children with ACL injury and their parents/ guardians make the best possible decisions.

  • 6.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia.
    Glasgow, Philip
    Sports Medicine, Sports Institute of Northern Ireland, Newtownabbey, UK.
    Schneiders, Anthony G
    School of Human, Health and Social Sciences, Central Queensland University, Branyan, Australia.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Clarsen, Benjamin
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Cools, Ann Mj
    Department of Rehabilitation Sciences and Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, Ghent University, Ghent, Belgium.
    Gojanovic, Boris
    Swiss Olympic Medical Center, Hopital de la Tour, Meyrin, Switzerland; Sports Medicine, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Vaudois, Lausanne, Switzerland.
    Griffin, Steffan
    College of Medical and Dental Sciences, University of Birmingham, Birmingham, UK.
    Khan, Karim
    Department of Family Practice, The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada; Centre for Hip Health and Mobility, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada.
    Moksnes, Håvard
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Mutch, Stephen
    SPACE Clinics, Edinburgh, UK; Scottish Rugby, Edinburgh, UK.
    Phillips, Nicola
    Postgraduate Healthcare Studies, Cardiff University, Cardiff, UK.
    Reurink, Guus
    Sports Medicine, Sports Physicians Group, Amsterdam, The Netherlands.
    Sadler, Robin
    Sports Medicine, Manchester City Football Club Ltd, Manchester, UK; Derby County FC, Derby, UK.
    Gravare Silbernagel, Karin
    Department of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware, Newark, USA.
    Thorborg, Kristian
    Sports Orthopaedic Research Center Copenhagen (SORC-C), Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark; Department of Orthopaedic Surgery and Physical Therapy, Amager-Hvidovre Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wangensteen, Arnlaug
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway; Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Wilk, Kevin
    Champion Sports Medicine, Birmingham, USA.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clinic, Zürich, Switzerland.
    Infographic: 2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 13, p. 995-995Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 7.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Glasgow, Philip
    Sport Northern Ireland Sports Institute, North Ireland; University of Ulster, North Ireland.
    Schneiders, Anthony
    Central Queensland University, Australia.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Clarsen, Benjamin
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Cools, Ann
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Gojanovic, Boris
    Hop La Tour, Switzerland; Lausanne University of and Hospital, Switzerland.
    Griffin, Steffan
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Khan, Karim M.
    University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Moksnes, Havard
    Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway; Olymp Elite Sports Program Olympiatoppen, Norway.
    Mutch, Stephen A.
    SPACE Clin, Scotland; Murrayfield Stadium, Scotland.
    Phillips, Nicola
    Cardiff University, Wales.
    Reurink, Gustaaf
    Sports Phys Grp, Netherlands.
    Sadler, Robin
    Manchester City Football Club, England.
    Gravare Silbernagel, Karin
    University of Delaware, DE USA.
    Thorborg, Kristian
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Wangensteen, Arnlaug
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Norwegian School Sports Science, Norway.
    Wilk, Kevin E.
    Champ Sports Med, AL USA.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    2016 Consensus statement on return to sport from the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy, Bern2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 14, p. 853-864Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Deciding when to return to sport after injury is complex and multifactorial-an exercise in risk management. Return to sport decisions are made every day by clinicians, athletes and coaches, ideally in a collaborative way. The purpose of this consensus statement was to present and synthesise current evidence to make recommendations for return to sport decision-making, clinical practice and future research directions related to returning athletes to sport. A half day meeting was held in Bern, Switzerland, after the First World Congress in Sports Physical Therapy. 17 expert clinicians participated. 4 main sections were initially agreed upon, then participants elected to join 1 of the 4 groups-each group focused on 1 section of the consensus statement. Participants in each group discussed and summarised the key issues for their section before the 17-member group met again for discussion to reach consensus on the content of the 4 sections. Return to sport is not a decision taken in isolation at the end of the recovery and rehabilitation process. Instead, return to sport should be viewed as a continuum, paralleled with recovery and rehabilitation. Biopsychosocial models may help the clinician make sense of individual factors that may influence the athletes return to sport, and the Strategic Assessment of Risk and Risk Tolerance framework may help decision-makers synthesise information to make an optimal return to sport decision. Research evidence to support return to sport decisions in clinical practice is scarce. Future research should focus on a standardised approach to defining, measuring and reporting return to sport outcomes, and identifying valuable prognostic factors for returning to sport.

  • 8.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Khan, Karim M.
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; University of British Columbia, Canada.
    Editorial Material: The old knee in the young athlete: knowns and unknowns in the return to play conversation in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 9, pp 505-U892016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 9, p. 505-U89Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 9.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Winters, Marinus
    Aalborg Univ, Denmark.
    Synthesising best evidence in systematic reviews when randomised controlled trials are absent: three tips for authors to add value for clinician readers2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 15, p. 948-+Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Ctr Clin Res Sormland, Eskilstuna, Sweden.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The impact of psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activities after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 22, p. 1613-U50Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to examine whether appraisal of knee function, psychological and demographic factors were related to returning to the preinjury sport and recreational activity following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Method 164 participants completed a questionnaire battery at 1-7 years after primary ACL reconstruction. The battery included questionnaires evaluating knee self-efficacy, health locus of control, psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, and fear of reinjury; and self-reported knee function in sport-specific tasks, knee-related quality of life and satisfaction with knee function. The primary outcome was returning to the preinjury sport or recreational activity. Results At follow-up, 40% (66/164) had returned to their preinjury activity. Those who returned had more positive psychological responses, reported better knee function in sport and recreational activities, perceived a higher knee-related quality of life and were more satisfied with their current knee function. The main reasons for not returning were not trusting the knee (28%), fear of a new injury (24%) and poor knee function (22%). Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreational activity, measured with the ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (was most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity). Age, sex and preinjury activity level were not related. Conclusions Less than 50% returned to their preinjury sport or recreational activity after ACL reconstruction. Psychological readiness to return to sport and recreation was the factor most strongly associated with returning to the preinjury activity. Including interventions aimed at improving this in postoperative rehabilitation programmes could be warranted to improve the rate of return to sport and recreational activities.

  • 11.
    Bahr, Roald
    et al.
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway; Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Thorborg, Kristian
    Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark; Copenhagen University Hospital, Denmark.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence-based hamstring injury prevention is not adopted by the majority of Champions League or Norwegian Premier League football teams: the Nordic Hamstring survey2015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The Nordic hamstring (NH) exercise programme was introduced in 2001 and has been shown to reduce the risk of acute hamstring injuries in football by at least 50%. Despite this, the rate of hamstring injuries has not decreased over the past decade in male elite football. Aim To examine the implementation of the NH exercise programme at the highest level of male football in Europe, the UEFA Champions League (UCL), and to compare this to the Norwegian Premier League, Tippeligaen, where the pioneer research on the NH programme was conducted. Design Retrospective survey. Setting/participants 50 professional football teams, 32 from the UCL and 18 from Tippeligaen. Methods A questionnaire, based on the Reach, Efficacy, Adoption, Implementation and Maintenance framework, addressing key issues related to the implementation of the NH programme during three seasons from 2012 through 2014, was distributed to team medical staff using electronic survey software. Results The response rate was 100%. Of the 150 club-seasons covered by the study, the NH programme was completed in full in 16 (10.7%) and in part in an additional 9 (6%) seasons. Consequently, 125 (83.3%) club-seasons were classified as non-compliant. There was no difference in compliance between the UCL and Tippeligaen in any season (chi(2): 0.41 to 0.52). Conclusions Adoption and implementation of the NH exercise programme at the highest levels of male football in Europe is low; too low to expect any overall effect on acute hamstring injury rates.

  • 12.
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Muscle injury rates in professional football increase with fixture congestion: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 743-747Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The influence of fixture congestion on injury rates and team performance has only been scarcely investigated.

    Aim To study associations between recovery time and match load and injury rates and team performance in professional football.

    Methods Exposure and time loss injuries were registered prospectively from 27 teams over 11 seasons. Matches were grouped according to recovery days before each match (≤3 vs >3 days, and ≤4 vs ≥6 days). Injury rates and team performance were compared between groups. Match load in match sequences containing five consecutive matches was determined by the number of days separating the first match and the last training session during that match sequence. Linear regression was used to study associations between match load and injury rates and team performance.

    Results Team performance showed no association with match load, or recovery days prior to matches, except for Europa League matches that indicated more matches lost with short recovery (≤3 days) (p=0.048). Total injury rates and muscle injury rates were increased in league matches with ≤4 days compared with ≥6 days’ recovery (RR 1.09, 95% CI 1.00 to 1.18, and RR 1.32, 95% CI 1.15 to 1.51, respectively), specifically hamstring and quadriceps injuries. High match load was associated with increase in muscle injury rate in matches in the same match sequence (p=0.012), and increase in ligament injury rate in training in the subsequent match sequence (p=0.003).

    Conclusions Fixture congestion was associated with increased muscle injury rates but had no, or very limited, influence on team performance.

  • 13.
    Bjorneboe, John
    et al.
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Kristensson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ronsen, Ola
    Aker Solut, Norway.
    Einar Andersen, Thor
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Role of illness in male professional football: not a major contributor to time loss2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 11, p. 699-702Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There are limited data on the nature, type and incidence of illness in football. Previous studies indicate that gastrointestinal and respiratory tract illnesses are most common. Aim To describe the incidence and burden of illness in male professional football. Methods Over the 4-year study period, 2011-2014, 73 professional football teams in Europe participated, with a total of 1 261 367 player-days recorded. All time-loss illnesses were recorded by the medical staff of each club. A recordable illness episode was any physical or psychological symptom (not related to injury) that resulted in the player being unable to participate fully in training or match play. Results A total of 1914 illness episodes were recorded. The illness incidence was 1.5 per 1000 player-days, meaning that, on average, a player experienced an illness episode every second season, with a median of 3 days absence per illness episode. Severe illness (absence amp;gt;4 weeks) constituted 2% of all illnesses. Respiratory tract illness was the most common (58%), followed by gastrointestinal illness (38%). Respiratory tract illness, gastrointestinal illness and cardiovascular illness caused the highest illness burden. Conclusions The illness incidence among male professional football players is low compared with the injury incidence. We found that the highest illness burden was caused by illness to the respiratory tract, gastrointestinal tract and cardiovascular system.

  • 14.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    A specific exercise strategy reduced the need for surgery in subacromial pain patients2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, p. 1431-1436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background and purpose A programme based on eccentric exercises for treating subacromial pain was in a previous study found effective at 3-month follow-up. The purposes of the present study were to investigate whether the results were maintained after 1 year and whether the baseline Constant-Murley score, rotator cuff status and radiological findings influenced the outcome. Patients and methods 97 patients on the waiting list for arthroscopic subacromial decompression had been randomised to a specific exercise programme or unspecific exercises (controls). After 3 months of exercises, the patients were asked whether they still wanted surgery and this option was available until a 1-year follow-up. 1 year after inclusion or 1 year after surgery, the number of patients who decided to have surgery in each group was compared. The choice of surgery was related to the baseline Constant-Murley score, ultrasound and radiographs taken at inclusion. Results All patients had improved significantly (pless than0.0001) in the Constant-Murley score at the 1-year follow-up. Significantly more patients in the control group decided to have surgery (63%) than those in the specific exercise group (24%; pless than0.0001). Patients who decided to have surgery had a significantly lower baseline Constant-Murley score and more often a full-thickness tear. Patients with partial tears did not differ from those with intact tendons. Interpretation The positive short-term results of specific exercises were maintained after 1 year, and this exercise strategy reduces the need for surgery. Full-thickness tear and a low baseline Constant-Murley score appear to be a predictive marker for a less good outcome.

  • 15.
    Ekas, Guri Ranum
    et al.
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe Univ, Australia.
    Grindem, Hege
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Engebretsen, Lars
    Oslo Univ Hosp, Norway; Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway; Univ Oslo, Norway.
    New meniscal tears after ACL injury: what is the risk? A systematic review protocol2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 6, article id 386Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Secondary meniscal tears after ACL injuries increase the risk of knee osteoarthritis. The current literature on secondary meniscal injuries after ACL injury is not consistent and may have methodological shortcomings. This protocol describes the methods of a systematic review investigating the rate of secondary meniscal injuries in children and adults after treatment (operative or non-operative) for ACL injury. Methods We will search electronic databases (Embase, Ovid Medline, Cochrane, CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature), SPORTDiscus, PEDro and Google Scholar) from database inception. Extracted data will include demographic data, methodology, intervention details and patient outcomes. Risk of bias will be assessed using the Newcastle Ottawa checklist for cohort studies. Article screening, eligibility assessment, risk of bias assessment and data extraction will be performed in duplicate by independent reviewers. A proportion meta-analysis will be performed if studies are homogeneous (I-2 amp;lt; 75%). If meta-analysis is precluded, data will be synthesised descriptively using best-evidence synthesis. The strength of recommendations and quality of evidence will be assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment Development and Evaluation working group methodology. Ethics and dissemination This protocol is written according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses, and was registered in the International Prospective Register of Systematic Reviews on 22 March 2016.

  • 16.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Injury Study Lead Expert, Linkoping, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Preventing injuries in professional football: thinking bigger and working together in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 12, pp 709-+2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 709-710Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 17.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Keeping your top players on the pitch: the key to football medicine at a professional level2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 723-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Askling, Carl
    Swedish School Sport and Health Science, Sweden .
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mithoefer, Kai
    Harvard University, MA USA .
    Return to play after thigh muscle injury in elite football players: implementation and validation of the Munich muscle injury classification2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 769-774Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Owing to the complexity and heterogeneity of muscle injuries, a generally accepted classification system is still lacking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims To prospectively implement and validate a novel muscle injury classification and to evaluate its predictive value for return to professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods The recently described Munich muscle injury classification was prospectively evaluated in 31 European professional male football teams during the 2011/2012 season. Thigh muscle injury types were recorded by team medical staff and correlated to individual player exposure and resultant time-loss. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 393 thigh muscle injuries occurred. The muscle classification system was well received with a 100% response rate. Two-thirds of thigh muscle injuries were classified as structural and were associated with longer lay-off times compared to functional muscle disorders (pandlt;0.001). Significant differences were observed between structural injury subgroups (minor partial, moderate partial and complete injuries) with increasing lay-off time associated with more severe structural injury. Median lay-off time of functional disorders was 5-8 days without significant differences between subgroups. There was no significant difference in the absence time between anterior and posterior thigh injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions The Munich muscle classification demonstrates a positive prognostic validity for return to play after thigh muscle injury in professional male football players. Structural injuries are associated with longer average lay-off times than functional muscle disorders. Subclassification of structural injuries correlates with return to play, while subgrouping of functional disorders shows less prognostic relevance. Functional disorders are often underestimated clinically and require further systematic study.

  • 19.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Healy, Jeremiah C
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lee, Justin C
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med.
    English, Bryan
    University of London.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Hamstring muscle injuries in professional football: the correlation of MRI findings with return to play2012In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 46, no 2, p. 112-117Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Hamstring injury is the single most common injury in professional football. MRI is commonly used to confirm the diagnosis and provide a prognosis of lay-off time. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective To evaluate the use of MRI as a prognostic tool for lay-off after hamstring injuries in professional football players and to study the association between MRI findings and injury circumstances. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Prospective cohort study where 23 European professional teams, were followed between 2007 and 2011. Team medical staffs recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. Radiological grading was performed using a modified Peetrons classification into four grades where grades 2 and 3 represent fibre disruption. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In total, 516 hamstring injuries occurred and 58% of these were examined by MRI. Thirteen per cent were grade 0 injuries, 57% grade 1, 27% of grade 2 and 3% of grade 3. Grade 0 and 1 injuries accounted for 56% (2141/3830 days) of the total lay-off. The layoff time differed between all four radiological grades of injury (8 +/- 3, 17 +/- 10, 22 +/- 11 and 73 +/- 60 days, p andlt; 0.0001). Eighty-three per cent of injuries affected the biceps femoris while 11% and 5% occurred to the semimembranosus and semitendinosus, respectively. Re-injuries (N=34/207) constituted 16% of injuries. All re-injuries occurred to the biceps femoris. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion MRI can be helpful in verifying the diagnosis of a hamstring injury and to prognosticate layoff time. Radiological grading is associated with lay-off times after injury. Seventy per cent of hamstring injuries seen in professional football are of radiological grade 0 or 1, meaning no signs of fibre disruption on MRI, but still cause the majority of absence days.

  • 20.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fewer ligament injuries but no preventive effect on muscle injuries and severe injuries: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 732-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanLimited information is available on the variation in injury rates over multiple seasons of professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo analyse time-trends in injury characteristics of male professional football players over 11 consecutive seasons. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 1743 players comprising 27 teams from 10 countries were followed prospectively between 2001 and 2012. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time loss injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanA total of 8029 time loss injuries were recorded. The match unavailability due to injury was 14% and constant over the study period. On average, a player sustained two injuries per season, resulting in approximately 50 injuries per team and season. The ligament injury rate decreased during the study period (R-2=0.608, b=-0.040, 95% CI -0.065 to -0.016, p=0.005), whereas the rate of muscle injury (R-2=0.228, b=-0.013, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.005, p=0.138) and severe injury (R-2=0.141, b=0.015, 95% CI -0.013 to 0.043, p=0.255) did not change over the study period. In addition, no changes in injury rates over the 11-year period were found for either training (R-2=0.000, b=0.000, 95% CI -0.035 to 0.034, p=0.988) or match play (R-2=0.282, b=-0.015, 95% CI -0.032 to 0.003, p=0.093). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe injury rate has decreased for ligament injuries over the last 11years, but overall training, match injury rates and the rates of muscle injury and severe injury remain high.

  • 21.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lee, Justin C.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Healy, Jeremiah C.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    MRI findings and return to play in football: a prospective analysis of 255 hamstring injuries in the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 738-743Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The present study evaluated whether the MRI parameters of hamstring injuries in male professional football players correlate with time to return to play (RTP). Methods 46 elite European football teams were followed prospectively for hamstring injuries between 2007 and 2014. Club medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss after hamstring injury. MRI parameters were evaluated by two independent radiologists and correlated with the RTP data. Results A total of 255 grade 1 and 2 injuries were evaluated in this study. RTP was longer for grade 2 than grade 1 injuries (24 +/- 13, 95% CI 21 to 26 days vs 18 +/- 15, 95% CI 16 to 20 days; mean difference: 6, 95% CI 2 to 9 days, p=0.004, d=0.39). 84% of injuries affected the biceps femoris (BF) muscle, whereas 12% and 4% affected the semimembranosus (SM) and semitendinosus (ST), respectively. No difference in lay-off time was found for injuries to the three different muscles (BF 20 +/- 15 days, SM 18 +/- 11 days, ST 23 +/- 14 days; p=0.83). The recurrence rate was higher for BF injuries than for SM and ST injuries combined (18% vs 2%, p=0.009). The size of the oedema weakly correlated with time to RTP (r(2)=6-12%). No correlation was found between location of injury and time to RTP. The majority of the intramuscular injuries affected the MT junction (56% in grade 1 and 2 injuries), but no difference in lay-off time was found between the different types of injuries. Conclusions The radiological grade and size of the oedema correlate with time to RTP for both, grade 1 and 2 injuries. No correlations were found between time to RTP and the location and type of injury.

  • 22.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lundqvist, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Education and Sociology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lagerbäck, Lars
    Linköping University.
    Vouillamoz, Marc
    UEFA, Switzerland.
    Papadimitiou, Niki
    UEFA, Switzerland.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Linköping University. Gothenburg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Is there a correlation between coaches leadership styles and injuries in elite football teams?: A study of 36 elite teams in 17 countries2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 8, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Do coaches’ leadership styles affect injury rates and the availability of players in professional football? Certain types of leadership behaviour may cause stress and have a negative impact on players’ health and well-being.

    Aim To investigate the transformational leadership styles of head coaches in elite men’s football and to evaluate the correlation between leadership styles, injury rates and players’ availability.

    Methods Medical staff from 36 elite football clubs in 17 European countries produced 77 reports at four postseason meetings with a view to assessing their perception of the type of leadership exhibited by the head coaches of their respective teams using the Global Transformational Leadership scale. At the same time, they also recorded details of individual players’ exposure to football and time-loss injuries.

    Results There was a negative correlation between the overall level of transformational leadership and the incidence of severe injuries (rho=−0.248; n=77; p=0.030); high levels of transformational leadership were associated with smaller numbers of severe injuries. Global Transformational Leadership only explained 6% of variation in the incidence of severe injuries (r2=0.062). The incidence of severe injuries was lower at clubs where coaches communicated a clear and positive vision, supported staff members and gave players encouragement and recognition. Players’ attendance rates at training were higher in teams where coaches gave encouragement and recognition to staff members, encouraged innovative thinking, fostered trust and cooperation and acted as role models.

    Conclusions There is an association between injury rates and players’ availability and the leadership style of the head coach.

  • 23.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    van Dijk, Niek C.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Fifth metatarsal fractures among male professional footballers: a potential career-ending disease2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 754-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThere is little information about Metatarsal Five (MT-5) fractures for specific sports. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanObjective less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanTo study the occurrence, the imaging characteristics, the lay-off times and healing problems of MT-5 fractures among male footballers. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSixty-four European elite teams were monitored from 2001 to 2012. x-Rays were collected and classified by the Torg criteria. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanOf 13754 injuries, 0.5% (67) proved to be MT-5 fractures. Their incidence was 0.04 injuries/1000h of exposure. A team of 25 players might thus expect an MT-5 fracture every fifth season. Of these fractures, 67% (38) were primary and 33% were refractures. One of the 38 primary fractures was an avulsion of the tuberosity; all the others (97%) located towards the base. In total, 32% of the players with MT-5 fracture were younger than 21years, 40% of the fractures occurred during the preseason and 45% of the players had prodromal symptoms. In total, 54% of the initial x-rays were classified as Torg type II (stress fractures), and 46% were classified as Torg type I (acute type). After surgical treatment the fractures healed faster, compared with conservative treatment (75% vs 33%, pandlt;0.05). There was no significant difference in lay-off days between players that had been operated, and those that had not (80 vs 74days, p=0.67). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe majority of MT-5 fractures are stress fractures, and mainly occur among young players. There are frequent healing problems, which might be explained by the stress nature of the injury. After surgery there are less healing problems, compared with those in conservative treatment.

  • 24.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A congested football calendar and the wellbeing of players: The correlation between exposure to match play for football players in European clubs during the months prior to the World Cup 2002 and the injuries and performance of these players during the World Cup2004In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 38, p. 493-497Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract

    Objectives: To investigate the correlation between exposure to match play for football players in European clubs during the months prior to the World Cup 2002 and the injuries and performance of these players during the World Cup.

    Methods: The team doctors at eleven of the best football clubs in Europe prospectively recorded player’s exposure and injuries during the 2001-2002 season (July 2001-May 2002). Sixty-five  players  participated in the World Cup in Korea/Japan (June 2002). During the World Cup, the clubs reported injuries sustained by these players, and their performance was evaluated by three international experts.

    Results: The number of  team matches during the season varied between 40 and 76 for the different countries involved. The individual player had a mean of 36 matches during the season. Top players played more matches, especially during the final period of the season. Players that participated in the World Cup (WC players) played more matches during the season compared to players who did not participate in the World Cup (46 vs 33 matches).

    WC players did not show an increased risk for injury during the season. Twenty-nine per cent of the WC players incurred injuries during the World Cup and 32% performed below their normal standard. The players who under-performed in the World Cup played more matches during the 10 weeks prior to the World Cup compared to those who performed better than expected (12.5 vs 9, p< 0.05). Twenty-three (60%) of the 38 players who had played more than 1 match/week prior to the World Cup incurred injuries or underperformed during the World Cup.

    Conclusions: There is a considerable variation in the number of matches played per season in European professional leagues. Top-level players are obliged to play many matches especially during the final period of the season.

  • 25.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Medical Comm, Switzerland.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hamstring injuries have increased by 4% annually in mens professional football, since 2001: a 13-year longitudinal analysis of the UEFA Elite Club injury study2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 731-737Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There are limited data on hamstring injury rates over time in football. Aim To analyse time trends in hamstring injury rates in male professional footballers over 13 consecutive seasons and to distinguish the relative contribution of training and match injuries. Methods 36 clubs from 12 European countries were followed between 2001 and 2014. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. Injuries per 1000 h were compared as a rate ratio (RR) with 95% CI. Injury burden was the number of lay off days per 1000 h. Seasonal trend for injury was analysed using linear regression. Results A total of 1614 hamstring injuries were recorded; 22% of players sustained at least one hamstring injury during a season. The overall hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period was 1.20 injuries per 1000 h; the match injury rate (4.77) being 9 times higher than the training injury rate (0.51; RR 9.4; 95% CI 8.5 to 10.4). The time-trend analysis showed an annual average 2.3% year on year increase in the total hamstring injury rate over the 13-year period (R-2=0.431, b=0.023, 95% CI 0.006 to 0.041, p=0.015). This increase over time was most pronounced for training injuries-these increased by 4.0% per year (R-2=0.450, b=0.040, 95% CI 0.011 to 0.070, p=0.012). The average hamstring injury burden was 19.7 days per 1000 h (annual average increase 4.1%) (R-2=0.437, b=0.041, 95% CI 0.010 to 0.072, p=0.014). Conclusions Training-related hamstring injury rates have increased substantially since 2001 but match-related injury rates have remained stable. The challenge is for clubs to reduce training-related hamstring injury rates without impairing match performance.

  • 26.
    Forsdyke, Dale
    et al.
    York St John University, England.
    Gledhill, Adam
    Leeds Beckett University, England.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; Trobe University, Australia.
    Psychological readiness to return to sport: three key elements to help the practitioner decide whether the athlete is REALLY ready?2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 7, p. 555-556Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 27.
    Fuller, C.W.
    et al.
    Centre for Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, United Kingdom.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Junge, A.
    FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Andersen, T.E.
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Bahr, R.
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Dvorak, J.
    FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Hagglund, M.
    McCrory, P.
    Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Meeuwisse, W.H.
    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., Canada.
    Consensus statement on injury definitions and data collection procedures in studies of football (soccer) injuries2006In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 40, no 3, p. 193-201Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variations in definitions and methodologies have created differences in the results and conclusions obtained from studies of football (soccer) injuries, making interstudy comparisons difficult. Therefore an Injury Consensus Group was established under the auspices of Federation Internationale de Football Association Medical Assessment and Research Centre. A nominal group consensus model approach was used. A working document on definitions, methodology, and implementation was discussed by the group. Iterative draft statements were prepared and circulated to members of the group for comment before the final consensus statement was produced. Definitions of injury, recurrent injury, severity, and training and match exposures in football together with criteria for classifying injuries in terms of location, type, diagnosis, and causation are proposed. Proforma for recording players' baseline information, injuries, and training and match exposures are presented. Recommendations are made on how the incidence of match and training injuries should be reported and a checklist of issues and information that should be included in published reports of studies of football injuries is presented.

  • 28.
    Fältström, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Jönköping County, Rehabilitation Centre, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    One ACL injury is enough! Focus on female football players: PhD Academy Award2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 16, p. 1235-1236Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 29.
    Gabbett, Tim J.
    et al.
    University of Queensland, Australia; Australian Catholic University, Australia.
    Kennelly, Steve
    New York Football Giants, NJ USA.
    Sheehan, Joe
    Cleveland Browns, OH USA.
    Hawkins, Richard
    Manchester United Football Club, England.
    Milsom, Jordan
    Liverpool Football Club, England.
    King, Enda
    University of Roehampton, England; Sports Surg Clin, Ireland.
    Whiteley, Rod
    Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Medical Comm, Switzerland.
    If overuse injury is a "training load error, should undertraining be viewed the same way? in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 50, issue 17, pp 1017-10182016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 17, p. 1017-1018Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 30.
    Gajhede-Knudsen, Mariann
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Maffulli, Nicola
    University of Salerno, Italy .
    Recurrence of Achilles tendon injuries in elite male football players is more common after early return to play: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 763-768Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background There is limited information about Achilles tendon disorders in professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAims To investigate the incidence, injury circumstances, lay-off times and reinjury rates of Achilles tendon disorders in male professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods A total of 27 clubs from 10 countries and 1743 players have been followed prospectively during 11 seasons between 2001 and 2012. The team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults A total of 203 (2.5% of all injuries) Achilles tendon disorders were registered. A majority (96%) of the disorders were tendinopathies, and nine were partial or total ruptures. A higher injury rate was found during the preseason compared with the competitive season, 0.25 vs 0.18/1000 h (rate ratio (RR) 1.4, 95% CI 1.1 to 2.0; p=0.027). The mean lay-off time for Achilles tendinopathies was 23 +/- 37 (median=10, Q(1)=4 and Q(3)=24) days, while a rupture of the Achilles tendon, on average, caused 161 +/- 65 (median=169, Q(1)=110 and Q(3)=189) days of absence. Players with Achilles tendon disorders were significantly older than the rest of the cohort, with a mean age of 27.2 +/- 4 years vs 25.6 +/- 4.6 years (pandlt;0.001). 27% of all Achilles tendinopathies were reinjuries. A higher reinjury risk was found after short recovery periods (31%) compared with longer recovery periods (13%) (RR 2.4, 95% CI 2.1 to 2.8; pandlt;0.001). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions Achilles tendon disorders account for 3.8% of the total lay-off time and are more common in older players. Recurrence is common after Achilles tendinopathies and the reinjury risk is higher after short recovery periods.

  • 31.
    Grassi, Alberto
    et al.
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Marcheggiani Muccioli, Giulio Maria
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Neri, Maria Pia
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Marcacci, Maurilio
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Zaffagnini, Stefano
    Ist Ortoped Rizzoli, Italy.
    Does revision ACL reconstruction measure up to primary surgery? A meta-analysis comparing patient-reported and clinician-reported outcomes, and radiographic results2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 716-724Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose To compare patient-reported and clinician-reported outcomes, and radiographic results between patients who had had revision ACL reconstruction and those who had had primary ACL reconstruction. Design Systematic review and meta-analysis Data sources The MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE and SPORTDiscus electronic databases were searched on 6 August 2015, using 3 main concepts: (1) revision ACL reconstruction, (2) primary ACL reconstruction and (3) treatment outcomes. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Articles that compared patient-reported or clinician-reported outcomes or radiographic results between patients who had had revision ACL reconstruction and those who had had primary surgery with a minimum of 2 years follow-up were included. The outcomes evaluated were the Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale, objective International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC) classification, Tegner Activity Scale, side-to-side difference in anterior tibial translation measured with KT-1000/2000 arthrometer, pivot shift test, tibiofemoral osteoarthritis grading on plain radiographs and subsequent knee surgeries. Results 8 studies (300 revision ACL reconstructions and 413 primary ACL reconstructions) were included in the meta-analysis. Patients who had had revision surgery reported inferior Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale scores (mean difference: 7.8 points), had inferior clinician-reported knee function as assessed with the objective IKDC classification (IKDC category A: 27% vs 57%; IKDC category C or D: 22% vs 8%) and pivot shift test (grade II or III: 7% vs 2%), and more radiographic evidence of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis (50% vs 25%) compared with patients who had had primary surgery. Conclusions Revision ACL reconstruction restored similar anterior-posterior knee laxity compared with primary ACL reconstruction. Patients who had had revision surgery reported inferior Lysholm Knee Scoring Scale scores, had inferior clinician-reported knee function and more radiographic signs of tibiofemoral osteoarthritis compared with patients with primary ACL reconstruction.

  • 32.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Republished research: Effect of specific exercise strategy on need for surgery in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: randomised controlled study2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, p. 1456-1457Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY QUESTION Can a specific exercise strategy improve shoulder function and pain in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, thereby decreasing the need for arthroscopic subacromial decompression? SUMMARY ANSWER Compared with a control exercise group, patients in the specific exercise group had significantly greater improvements in shoulder function and pain and fewer patients needed surgery at the three month assessment. WHAT IS KNOWN AND WHAT THIS PAPER ADDS Different exercise programmes are used as first line treatment in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, but conclusive evidence to support the efficacy for these programmes is lacking. This specific exercise strategy proved effective in improving shoulder function and pain in patients in whom earlier conservative treatment had failed.

  • 33.
    Holmgren, Theresa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Björnsson Hallgren, Hanna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Republished research: Effect of specific exercise strategy on need for surgery in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome: randomised controlled study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 14, p. 908-908Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Study question

    Can a specific exercise strategy improve shoulder function and pain in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, thereby decreasing the need for arthroscopic subacromial decompression?

    Summary answer

    Compared with a control exercise group, patients in the specific exercise group had significantly greater improvements in shoulder function and pain and fewer patients needed surgery at the three month assessment.

    What is known and what this paper adds

    Different exercise programmes are used as first line treatment in patients with subacromial impingement syndrome, but conclusive evidence to support the efficacy for these programmes is lacking. This specific exercise strategy proved effective in improving shoulder function and pain in patients in whom earlier conservative treatment had failed.

  • 34.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Atroshi, Isam
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Wagner, Philippe
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Walden, Markus
    Hassleholm Kristianstad Ystad Hospital, Sweden.
    Superior compliance with a neuromuscular training programme is associated with fewer ACL injuries and fewer acute knee injuries in female adolescent football players: secondary analysis of an RCT2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 15, p. 974-979Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Little is known about the influence of compliance with neuromuscular training (NMT) on the knee injury rate in football.

    Aim To evaluate team and player compliance with an NMT programme in adolescent female football and to study the association between compliance and acute knee injury rates.

    Methods Prospective cohort study based on a cluster randomised controlled trial on players aged 12–17 years with 184 intervention teams (2471 players) and 157 control teams (2085 players). Exposure and acute time loss knee injuries were recorded. Team and player compliance was recorded by the coaches on a player attendance form. The intervention group was divided into tertiles of compliance. Injury rates were compared by calculating rate ratios (RRs) and 95% CIs using exact Poisson tests with the low-compliance tertile as reference. Seasonal compliance trends were analysed using linear regression.

    Results Players in the high-compliance tertile had an 88% reduction in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rate (RR 0.12, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.85), whereas the rate in the control group players was not significantly different from those in the low-compliance tertile (RR 0.77, 95% CI 0.27 to 2.21). A significant deterioration occurred in team (b=−3.0% per month, 95% CI −5.2 to −0.8) and player (b=−5.0% per month, 95% CI −7.1 to −2.9) compliance over the season.

    Conclusions Players with high compliance with the NMT programme had significantly reduced ACL injury rate compared with players with low compliance. Significant deterioration in team and player compliance occurred over the season.

  • 35.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Hakan
    Football Research Group, Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Injuries affect team performance negatively in professional football: an 11-year follow-up of the UEFA Champions League injury study2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 738-742Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background The influence of injuries on team performance in football has only been scarcely investigated.

    Aim To study the association between injury rates and team performance in the domestic league play, and in European cups, in male professional football.

    Methods 24 football teams from nine European countries were followed prospectively for 11 seasons (2001–2012), including 155 team-seasons. Individual training and match exposure and time-loss injuries were registered. To analyse the effect of injury rates on performance, a Generalised Estimating Equation was used to fit a linear regression on team-level data. Each team's season injury rate and performance were evaluated using its own preceding season data for comparison in the analyses.

    Results 7792 injuries were reported during 1 026 104 exposure hours. The total injury incidence was 7.7 injuries/1000 h, injury burden 130 injury days lost/1000 h and player match availability 86%. Lower injury burden (p=0.011) and higher match availability (p=0.031) were associated with higher final league ranking. Similarly, lower injury incidence (p=0.035), lower injury burden (p<0.001) and higher match availability (p<0.001) were associated with increased points per league match. Finally, lower injury burden (p=0.043) and higher match availability (p=0.048) were associated with an increase in the Union of European Football Association (UEFA) Season Club Coefficient, reflecting success in the UEFA Champions League or Europa League.

    Conclusions Injuries had a significant influence on performance in the league play and in European cups in male professional football. The findings stress the importance of injury prevention to increase a team's chances of success.

  • 36.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Bahr, R
    Sports and psysical education Norwegian university, Oslo.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Methods for epidemiological study of injuries to prfessional football players: developing the UEFA model2005In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 39, p. 340-346Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 37.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Injury recurrence is lower at the highest professional football level than at national and amateur levels: does sports medicine and sports physiotherapy deliver?2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 751-758Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previous injury is a well-documented risk factor for football injury. The time trends and patterns of recurrent injuries at different playing levels are not clear. Aim To compare recurrent injury proportions, incidences and patterns between different football playing levels, and to study time trends in recurrent injury incidence. Methods Time-loss injuries were collected from injury surveillance of 43 top-level European professional teams (240 team-seasons), 19 Swedish premier division teams (82 team-seasons) and 10 Swedish amateur teams (10 team-seasons). Recurrent injury was defined as an injury of the same type and at the same site as an index injury within the preceding year, with injury amp;lt;2 months defined as an early recurrence, and amp;gt;2 months as a delayed recurrence. Seasonal trend for recurrent injury incidence, expressed as the average annual percentage of change, was analysed using linear regression. Results 13 050 injuries were included, 2449 (18.8%) being recurrent injuries, with 1944 early (14.9%) and 505 delayed recurrences (3.9%). Recurrence proportions were highest in the second half of the competitive season for all cohorts. Recurrence proportions differed between playing levels, with 35.1% in the amateur cohort, 25.0% in the Swedish elite cohort and 16.6% in the European cohort (chi(2) overall effect, pamp;lt;0.001). A decreasing trend was observed in recurrent injury incidence in the European cohort, a -2.9% average annual change over the 14-year study period (95% CI -5.4% to -0.4%, p=0.026). Similarly, a decreasing tendency was also seen in the Swedish premier division. Conclusions Recurrence proportions showed an inverse relationship with playing level, and recurrent injury incidence has decreased over the past decade.

  • 38.
    Hägglund, Martin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thomee, R.
    Gothenburg University, Sweden.
    Editorial Material: Should patients reach certain knee function benchmarks before anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction? Does intense prehabilitation before anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction influence outcome and return to sports? in BRITISH JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, vol 49, issue 22, pp 1423-14242015In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 49, no 22, p. 1423-1424Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 39.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Renström, Per
    Karolinska Institutet, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Injury patterns in Swedish elite athletics – part 1: annual incidence and injury types2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To estimate the incidence, type and severity of musculoskeletal injuries in youth and adult elite athletics athletes and to explore risk factors for sustaining injuries. Design Prospective cohort study conducted during a 52-week period. Setting Male and female youth and adult athletics athletes ranked in the top 10 in Sweden (n=292). Results 199 (68%) athletes reported an injury during the study season. Ninety-six per cent of the reported injuries were non-traumatic (associated with overuse). Most injuries (51%) were severe, causing a period of absence from normal training exceeding 3 weeks. Log-rank tests revealed risk differences with regard to athlete category (p=0.046), recent previous injury (>3 weeks time-loss; p=0.039) and training load rank index (TLRI; p=0.019). Cox proportional hazards regression analyses showed that athletes in the third (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.54 to 2.78) and fourth TLRI quartiles (HR 1.79; 95% CI 1.16 to 2.74) had almost a twofold increased risk of injury compared with their peers in the first quartile and interaction effects between athlete category and previous injury; youth male athletes with a previous serious injury had more than a fourfold increased risk of injury (HR=4.39; 95% CI 2.20 to 8.77) compared with youth females with no previous injury. Conclusions The injury incidence among both youth and adult elite athletics athletes is high. A training load index combing hours and intensity and a history of severe injury the previous year were predictors for injury. Further studies on measures to quantify training content and protocols for safe return to athletics are warranted.

  • 40.
    Johansson, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Multidirectional instability of the glenohumeral joint: an unstable classification resulting in uncertain evidence-based practice2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 18, p. 1105-1106Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 41.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bjørneboe, John
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersen, Thor Einar
    Norwegian School Sport Science, Norway.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Nordic Football Injury Audit: higher injury rates for professional football clubs with third-generation artificial turf at their home venue2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 775-781Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Previously, no difference in acute injury rate has been found when playing football on artificial turf (AT) compared with natural grass (NG).

    Aim To compare acute injury rates in professional football played on AT and NG at the individual player level; and to compare, at club level, acute and overuse injury rates between clubs that have AT at their home venue (AT clubs) and clubs that have NG (NG clubs).

    Methods 32 clubs (AT, n=11; NG, n=21) in the male Swedish and Norwegian premier leagues were followed prospectively during the 2010 and 2011 seasons. Injury rate was expressed as the number of time loss injuries/1000 h and compared with rate ratio (RR) and 99% CI.

    Results No statistically significant differences were found in acute injury rates on AT compared with NG during match play (RR 0.98, 99% CI 0.79 to 1.22) or training (RR 1.14, 99% CI 0.86 to 1.50) when analysing at the individual player level. When analysing at the club level, however, AT clubs had a significantly higher acute training injury rate (RR 1.31, 99% CI 1.04 to 1.63) and overuse injury rate (RR 1.38, 99% CI 1.14 to 1.65) compared with NG clubs.

    Conclusions At the individual player level, no significant differences were found in acute injury rates when playing on AT compared with NG. However, clubs with AT at their home venue had higher rates of acute training injuries and overuse injuries compared with clubs that played home matches on NG.

  • 42.
    Lai, Courtney C. H.
    et al.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe University, Australia; Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Feller, Julian A.
    OrthoSport Victoria, Australia.
    Webster, Kate E.
    La Trobe University, Australia.
    Eighty-three per cent of elite athletes return to preinjury sport after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: a systematic review with meta-analysis of return to sport rates, graft rupture rates and performance outcomes2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 2, p. 128-138Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives The primary objective was to calculate the rate of return to sport (RTS) following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction in elite athletes. Secondary objectives were to estimate the time taken to RTS, calculate rates of ACL graft rupture, evaluate postsurgical athletic performance and identify determinants of RTS. Design Pooled RTS and graft rupture rates were calculated using random effects proportion meta-analysis. Time to RTS, performance data and determinants of RTS were synthesised descriptively. Data sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, AMED, CINAHL, AMI, PEDro, SPORTDiscus and The Cochrane Library were searched from inception to 19 January 2016. Hand searching of 10 sports medicine journals and reference checking were also performed. Eligibility criteria for selecting studies Studies were included if they reported the ratio of elite athletes who returned to their preinjury level of sport following ACL reconstruction. Twenty-four studies were included. Results The pooled RTS rate was 83% (95% CI 77% to 88%). The mean time to RTS ranged from 6 to 13 months. The pooled graft rupture rate was 5.2% (95% CI 2.8% to 8.3%). Six out of nine studies that included a noninjured control group found no significant deterioration in athletic performance following ACL reconstruction. Indicators of greater athletic skill or value to the team were associated with RTS. Summary and conclusions Eighty-three per cent of elite athletes returned to sport following ACL reconstruction, while 5.2% sustained a graft rupture. Most athletes who returned to sport performed comparably with matched, uninjured controls. This information may assist in guiding expectations of athletes and clinicians following ACL reconstruction.

  • 43.
    Larsson, David
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Magnus K.
    Skåne University Hospital, Lund University Malmö, Malmö, Skåne, Sweden.
    Fracture epidemiology in male elite football players from 2001 to 2013: How long will this fracture keep me out?2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 759-763Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Determining fracture risk and rehabilitation periods after specific fractures in professional football is essential for team planning. Aim To identify fracture epidemiology and absences after different types of fractures in male professional football players. Methods 2439 players from 41 professional male teams in 10 countries were followed prospectively from 2001 to 2013. Team medical staff registered fractures, absences after fractures and player exposure. Results 364 fractures were recorded, with an incidence of 0.27/1000 h of exposure (95% CI 0.25 to 0.30). The incidence of traumatic fractures was 0.25 (0.22 to 0.27) and that of stress fractures was 0.03 (0.02 to 0.04). 45% of traumatic fractures and 86% of stress fractures affected the lower extremities. Absence after a fracture was 32 days (1-278) (median (range)), compared to that after a traumatic fracture of 30 days (1-278) and a stress fracture of 65 days (6-168) (pamp;lt;0.001). Annual fracture incidence was stable during the study period (R-2=0.051, b=-0.011 (95% CI -0.043 to 0.021)). Young players had a relative risk of 10.9 (3.3 to 35.6) of sustaining stress fractures compared to old players (pamp;lt;0.01). The fracture incidence did not differ between individuals in different playing positions (p=0.10). Summary A male professional football team can expect 1 to 2 fractures per season. There are more traumatic fractures than stress fractures; while most fractures affect the lower extremities, stress fractures yield longer absences than traumatic fractures and young players have more stress fractures than old players. There is no difference in risk among players at different playing positions.

  • 44.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Implementation of a neuromuscular training programme in female adolescent football: 3-year follow-up study after a randomised controlled trial2014In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 48, no 19, p. 1425-1430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Neuromuscular training (NMT) has been shown to reduce anterior cruciate ligament injury rates in highly structured clinical trials. However, there is a paucity of studies that evaluate implementation of NMT programmes in sports.

    AIM: To evaluate the implementation of an NMT programme in female adolescent football 3 years after a randomised controlled trial (RCT).

    METHODS: Cross-sectional follow-up after an RCT using the Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance Sports Setting Matrix (RE-AIM SSM) framework. Questionnaires were sent to the Swedish Football Association (FA), to eight district FAs and coaches (n=303) that participated in the RCT in 2009, and coaches who did not participate in the RCT but were coaching female adolescent football teams during the 2012 season (n=496).

    RESULTS: Response rates were 100% among the FAs, 57% among trial coaches and 36% among currently active coaches. The reach of the intervention was high, 99% of trial coaches (control group) and 91% of current coaches were familiar with the programme. The adoption rate was 74% among current coaches, but programme modifications were common among coaches. No district FA had formal policies regarding implementation, and 87% of current coaches reported no club routines for programme use. Maintenance was fairly high; 82% of trial coaches from the intervention group and 68% from the control group still used the programme.

    CONCLUSIONS: Reach and adoption of the programme was high among coaches. However, this study identified low programme fidelity and lack of formal policies for its implementation and use in clubs and district FAs.

  • 45.
    Lundblad, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Walden, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Magnusson, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlsson, Jon
    Sahlgrenska University, Sweden .
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The UEFA injury study: 11-year data concerning 346 MCL injuries and time to return to play2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 12, p. 759-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Medial collateral ligament (MCL) injury is the most common knee ligament injury in professional football. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanAim To investigate the rate and circumstances of MCL injuries and development over the past decade. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Prospective cohort study, in which 27 professional European teams were followed over 11 seasons (2001/2002 to 2011/2012). Team medical staffs recorded player exposure and time loss injuries. MCL injuries were classified into four severity categories. Injury rate was defined as the number of injuries per 1000 player-hours. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults 346 MCL injuries occurred during 1057 201 h (rate 0.33/1000 h). The match injury rate was nine times higher than the training injury rate (1.31 vs 0.14/1000 h, rate ratio 9.3, 95% CI 7.5 to 11.6, pandlt;0.001). There was a significant average annual decrease of approximately 7% (p=0.023). The average lay-off was 23 days, and there was no difference in median lay-off between index injuries and reinjuries (18 vs 13, p=0.20). Almost 70% of all MCL injuries were contact-related, and there was no difference in median lay-off between contact and non-contact injuries (16 vs 16, p=0.74). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions This largest series of MCL injuries in professional football suggests that the time loss from football for MCL injury is 23 days. Also, the MCL injury rate decreased significantly during the 11-year study period.

  • 46.
    McCall, Alan
    et al.
    University of Edinburgh Napier, Scotland.
    Dupont, Gregory
    University of Edinburgh Napier, Scotland; University of Lille Nordic France, France.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. UEFA Medical Comm, Switzerland.
    Injury prevention strategies, coach compliance and player adherence of 33 of the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study teams: a survey of teams head medical officers2016In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 50, no 12, p. 725-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Purpose (1) To quantify current practice at the most elite level of professional club football in Europe with regard to injury prevention strategy; (2) to describe player adherence and coach compliance to the overall injury prevention programme. Methods A structured online survey was administered to the Head medical officers of 34 elite European teams currently participating in the UEFA Elite Club Injury Study. The survey had 4 sections; (1) risk factors for injury, (2) assessment and monitoring of injury risk, (3) prevention strategies and (4) coach compliance and player adherence to the injury prevention process. Results 33 (97%) Medical officers of the teams responded. The most important perceived injury risk factor was previous injury. Four of the top 6 risk factors physical fitness, accumulated fatigue, reduced recovery time between matches and training load-were related to player workload. The top 3 preventative exercises were eccentric, balance/proprioception and core training. Regarding monitoring, the top 3 tools implemented were measurement of workload, subjective wellness and a general medical screen. The subjectively rated level of coach compliance in UEFA teams was perceived as high, while the player adherence varied from none at all to perfect. Summary and conclusion Medical officers place importance on workload-related variables as risk factors for injury in elite European football players. A lack of consistently high player adherence may limit the effects of contemporary injury prevention programmes in elite European footballers.

  • 47.
    McCall, Alan
    et al.
    Arsenal Football Club, England; Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland.
    Lewin, Colin
    Arsenal Football Club, England.
    ODriscoll, Gary
    Arsenal Football Club, England.
    Witvrouw, Erik
    University of Ghent, Belgium.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia.
    Return to play: the challenge of balancing research and practice2017In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 51, no 9, p. 702-703Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 48.
    McClean, Gavin
    et al.
    Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
    Riding, Nathan R.
    Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia .
    Farooq, Abdulaziz
    Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Pieles, Guido E.
    National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Cardiovascular Biomedical Research Unit, Congenital Heart Unit, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children and Bristol Heart Institute, Bristol, UK; School of Clinical Sciences, University of Bristol, Bristol, UK.
    Watt, Victoria
    Department of Sports Medicine, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Adamuz, Carmen
    Department of Sports Medicine, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    George, Keith P.
    Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
    Oxborough, David
    Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK.
    Wilson, Mathew G.
    Athlete Health and Performance Research Centre, ASPETAR Qatar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar; Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Science, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool, UK; Research Institute of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Canberra, Australia.
    Electrical and structural adaptations of the paediatric athletes heart: a systematic review with meta-analysis2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 4, article id 230Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To describe the electrocardiographic (ECG) and echocardiographic manifestations of the paediatric athletes heart, and examine the impact of age, race and sex on cardiac remodelling responses to competitive sport.

  • 49.
    Mohtadi, Nicholas
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, University of Calgary Sport Medicine Centre, Calgary, Alberta, Canada.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Engebretsen, Lars
    Division of Orthopaedic Surgery, Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway.
    Why all the fuss about paediatric ACL rupture: isnt the meniscus much more important?2018In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 52, no 7, p. 417-418Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 50.
    Mueller-Wohlfahrt, Hans-Wilhelm
    et al.
    Munich and Football Club FC Bayern Munich, Germany .
    Haensel, Lutz
    Munich and Football Club FC Bayern Munich, Germany .
    Mithoefer, Kai
    Harvard University, MA USA .
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    English, Bryan
    Football Club Chelsea, England .
    McNally, Steven
    Football Club Manchester United, England .
    Orchard, John
    University of Sydney, Australia .
    van Dijk, C Niek
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Kerkhoffs, Gino M.
    University of Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Schamasch, Patrick
    Int Olymp Comm, Switzerland .
    Blottner, Dieter
    Charite, Germany .
    Swaerd, Leif
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden .
    Goedhart, Edwin
    Football Club Ajax Amsterdam, Netherlands .
    Ueblacker, Peter
    Munich and Football Club FC Bayern Munich, Germany .
    Terminology and classification of muscle injuries in sport: The Munich consensus statement2013In: British Journal of Sports Medicine, ISSN 0306-3674, E-ISSN 1473-0480, Vol. 47, no 6, p. 342-U17Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective To provide a clear terminology and classification of muscle injuries in order to facilitate effective communication among medical practitioners and development of systematic treatment strategies. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods Thirty native English-speaking scientists and team doctors of national and first division professional sports teams were asked to complete a questionnaire on muscle injuries to evaluate the currently used terminology of athletic muscle injury. In addition, a consensus meeting of international sports medicine experts was established to develop practical and scientific definitions of muscle injuries as well as a new and comprehensive classification system. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults The response rate of the survey was 63%. The responses confirmed the marked variability in the use of the terminology relating to muscle injury, with the most obvious inconsistencies for the term strain. In the consensus meeting, practical and systematic terms were defined and established. In addition, a new comprehensive classification system was developed, which differentiates between four types: functional muscle disorders (type 1: overexertion-related and type 2: neuromuscular muscle disorders) describing disorders without macroscopic evidence of fibre tear and structural muscle injuries (type 3: partial tears and type 4: (sub) total tears/tendinous avulsions) with macroscopic evidence of fibre tear, that is, structural damage. Subclassifications are presented for each type. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions A consistent English terminology as well as a comprehensive classification system for athletic muscle injuries which is proven in the daily practice are presented. This will help to improve clarity of communication for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes and can serve as the basis for future comparative studies to address the continued lack of systematic information on muscle injuries in the literature. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanWhat are the new things Consensus definitions of the terminology which is used in the field of muscle injuries as well as a new comprehensive classification system which clearly defines types of athletic muscle injuries.

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