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  • 1.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar; La Trobe University, Australia; Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Peterson, Gunnel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Landén Ludvigsson, Maria
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Department of Rehabilitation in Motala. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Satisfaction With the Outcome of Physical Therapist-Prescribed Exercise in Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorders: Secondary Analysis of a Randomized Clinical Trial2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 8, p. 640-+Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Secondary analysis of a randomized clinical trial. BACKGROUND: Patient perception of the benefits gained from treatment is important, yet satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic whiplash-associated disorders (WADs) has not been investigated. OBJECTIVES: To investigate whether satisfaction with the outcome of treatment for chronic WAD changed over time, and whether there were group differences. METHODS: Two hundred sixteen people with chronic WAD (66% women; mean age, 40.4 years) participated in a 3-month program of physical therapist-led neck-specific exercises with or without a behavioral approach, or received a prescription of general physical activity. The main outcome was satisfaction with the outcome of treatment, assessed at baseline and 3, 6, and 12 months later. Additional outcomes were enablement and expectation fulfillment. RESULTS: Satisfaction improved over time in the 3 groups (odds ratio = 1.15; 95% confidence interval: 1.10, 1.20; P amp;lt; .001). There was a significant group-by-time interaction (P amp;lt; 001), with increased odds of being satisfied in the groups receiving neck-specific exercises compared to general physical activity. Enablement increased after completion of the intervention in all groups (P amp;lt; .001). People who received neck-specific exercises reported greater enablement and expectation fulfillment than people prescribed general physical activity (P amp;lt; .01). CONCLUSION: Exercise interventions for chronic WAD led to increased satisfaction for 12 months following treatment that was unrelated to the type of exercise intervention received.

  • 2.
    Arundale, Amelia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Univ Delaware, DE 19716 USA.
    Bizzini, Mario
    Schulthess Clin, Switzerland.
    Giordano, Airelle
    Univ Delaware, DE USA.
    Hewett, Timothy E.
    Mayo Clin, MN USA.
    Logerstedt, David S.
    Univ Sci, PA USA.
    Mandelbaum, Bert
    Santa Monica Orthopaed and Sports Med Grp, CA USA.
    Scalzitti, David A.
    George Washington Univ, DC USA.
    Silvers-Granelli, Holly
    Univ Delaware, DE 19716 USA; Veloc Phys Therapy, CA USA.
    Snyder-Mackler, Lynn
    Univ Delaware, DE USA.
    Exercise-Based Knee and Anterior Cruciate Ligament Injury Prevention2018In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 48, no 9, p. A1-A42Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3. Beynnon, Bruce D
    et al.
    Good, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Risberg, May Arna
    The effect of bracing on proprioception of knees with anterior cruciate ligament injury2002In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 32, p. 11-15Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Karlsson, Anette
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Åslund, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    West, Janne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Romu, Thobias
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Smedby, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). KTH Royal Institute Technology, Sweden.
    Zsigmond, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Neurosurgery.
    Peolsson, Anneli
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    An Investigation of Fat Infiltration of the Multifidus Muscle in Patients With Severe Neck Symptoms Associated With Chronic Whiplash-Associated Disorder2016In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 46, no 10, p. 886-893Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. BACKGROUND: Findings of fat infiltration in cervical spine multifidus, as a sign of degenerative morphometric changes due to whiplash injury, need to be verified. OBJECTIVES: To develop a method using water/fat magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to investigate fat infiltration and cross-sectional area of multifidus muscle in individuals with whiplash associated disorders (WADS) compared to healthy controls. METHODS: Fat infiltration and cross-sectional area in the multifidus muscles spanning the C4 to C7 segmental levels were investigated by manual segmentation using water/fat-separated MRI in 31 participants with WAD and 31 controls, matched for age and sex. RESULTS: Based on average values for data spanning C4 to C7, participants with severe disability related to WAD had 38% greater muscular fat infiltration compared to healthy controls (P = .03) and 45% greater fat infiltration compared to those with mild to moderate disability related to WAD (P = .02). There were no significant differences between those with mild to moderate disability and healthy controls. No significant differences between groups were found for multifidus cross-sectional area. Significant differences were observed for both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration between segmental levels. CONCLUSION: Participants with severe disability after a whiplash injury had higher fat infiltration in the multifidus compared to controls and to those with mild/moderate disability secondary to WAD. Earlier reported findings using T1-weighted MRI were reproduced using refined imaging technology. The results of the study also indicate a risk when segmenting single cross-sectional slices, as both cross-sectional area and fat infiltration differ between cervical levels.

  • 5.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Sagittal plane knee motion in the ACL-deficient knee during body weight shift exercises on different support surfaces2006In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 36, no 12, p. 954-962Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study design: Experimental design with group comparisons. Objectives: To compare anterior tibial translation and muscle activity among different exercises for early weight-bearing and neuromuscular training in individuals with a unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury and in uninjured controls. Background: The effects of exercise and activity on tibial translation must be taken into consideration during rehabilitation after ACL injury. Methods and Measures: Twelve patients with an ACL-deficient knee and 12 age- and gender-matched controls participated in the study. Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activity were registered during the Lachman test (static translation) and 4 body weight shift exercises (dynamic translation). A Student t test with Bonferroni correction and analysis of variance were used for the statistical analysis. Results: Forward-backward body weight shift exercise resulted in smaller anterior tibial translation compared to body weight shift from side to side. Analysis of EMG activity could not explain this difference in anterior tibial translation. The amount of anterior tibial translation or EMG activity did not change when the exercises were performed on a trampoline compared to a firm surface. Conclusions: Forward-backward weight shifting may be preferable in initial rehabilitation after ACL injury compared to body weight shift from side to side.

  • 6.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Karlberg, Christian
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gerdle, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gillquist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anterior tibial translation during different isokinetic quadriceps torque in anterior cruciate ligament deficient and nonimpaired individuals2001In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 31, no 1, p. 4-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Study Design: Factorial quasi-experimental design.

    Objectives: To quantify the effect of different levels of isokinetic concentric and eccentric knee extensor torques on the anterior tibial translation in subjects with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. Electromyogram (EMG) activity of 4 leg muscles was recorded in order to detect any co-activation of extensors and flexors.

    Background: The rehabilitation after an ACL injury is of importance for the functional outcome of the patient. In order to construct a rehabilitation program after that injury, it is important to understand the in vivo relationships between muscle force and tibial translation.

    Methods and Measures: Twelve patients with unilateral ACL injury and 11 uninjured volunteers performed 36 repetitions of a quadriceps contraction at different isokinetic concentric and eccentric torque levels, on a KinCom machine (60°•s-1), with simultaneous recordings of tibial translation (CA-4000) and EMG activity from quadriceps and hamstrings muscles. Tibial translations and EMG levels were normalized to the maximum of each subject.

    Results: The individual anterior tibial translation increased with increased quadriceps torque in a similar manner in both quadriceps contraction modes in all legs tested. During concentric mode, translation was similar in all groups, but during eccentric mode, the mean translation was 38% larger in the ACL injured knees. No quadriceps-hamstrings co-activation occurred in any test or group.

    Conclusions: An ACL deficient knee can limit the translation within a normal space during concentric muscle activity but not during eccentric activity. That limitation depends on other mechanisms than hamstrings co-activation.

  • 7.
    Österberg, Annika
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Abrandt Dahlgren, Madeleine
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Medical Pedagogics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ways of experiencing participation and factors affecting the activity level after nonreconstructed anterior cruciate ligament injury: a qualitative study2013In: Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy, ISSN 0190-6011, E-ISSN 1938-1344, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 172-183Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    STUDY DESIGN: Phenomenographic, cross-sectional. OBJECTIVES: To describe ways of experiencing participation in activities of individuals with a nonreconstructed anterior cruciate ligament injury and to describe the emotional aspects related to participation. Further, the objective was to explore factors affecting the activity level. BACKGROUND: The importance of assessing different factors (knee status, muscle performance, psychological factors, performance-based tests, and subjective rating of knee function) after an anterior cruciate ligament injury has been emphasized. However, the results of these assessments do not answer the question of how the individuals themselves experience their participation in activities. METHODS: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 19 strategically selected informants (age range, 18-43 years) who had sustained an anterior cruciate ligament injury 18 to 67 months previously. A phenomenographic approach, which describes individuals' ways of experiencing a phenomenon, was used. RESULTS: Five qualitatively different categories were identified: (A) unconditioned participation, (B) participation as conditioned by risk appraisal, (C) participation as conditioned by experienced control of the knee, (D) participation as conditioned by experienced knee impairment, and (E) participation as conditioned by neglecting the knee injury. Within each category, 5 interrelated aspects were discerned: focus, level of performance, activities, strategies, and feelings. Categories A, C, and E reflected experiences of full participation, whereas categories B and D reflected experiences of modified participation. There were mostly positive feelings regarding participation. Negative feelings were expressed in category D. Factors affecting the activity level were grouped according to the framework of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health and described as facilitating or hindering the activity level. Facilitating factors included regaining and maintaining physical function, regaining confidence in knee function, and learning/relearning movement patterns. Hindering factors included fear of injury/reinjury, uncontrollable giving way, and loss of motivation. CONCLUSION: With different strategies, most of the informants achieved a satisfactory activity level, despite impairments and decreased activity level. Both physical and psychological factors were described to affect the activity level, as well as time since injury.

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