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  • 1.
    Carter, Josh
    et al.
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia.
    Marshall, Nick
    Surflife Physio, Miami, Australia.
    Abbott, Allan
    Bond Institute of Health and Sport, Faculty of Health Science and Medicine, Bond University, Australia / Division of Physiotherapy, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden / Department of Physiotherapy, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Shoulder Pain and Dysfunction in Young Surf Lifesavers2015In: Physical Therapy in Sport, ISSN 1466-853X, E-ISSN 1873-1600, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 162-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    To determine the incidence and prevalence of significantly interrupting shoulder pain (SIP) in young surf lifesavers and to determine association with training dosage and the ‘combined elevation test’.

    Participants

    54 surf lifesavers aged 10 – 18 from the Gold Coast, Australia.

    Methods and Outcome Measures

    Retrospective survey of SIP and training dosage. Cross-sectional measures of the combined elevation test.

    Design

    Retrospective.

    Results

    56.5% of female surf lifesavers reported a history of SIP compared to males with 48.5%. Females had a higher combined elevation score compared to males, 28.32±SD8.52cm and 26.09±SD6.64cm, respectively. Young surf lifesavers had an incidence rate of 2.1 SIP episodes per thousand hours of training, an incidence proportion of 51.9% and prevalence of 18.5%. Combined elevation had low level positive trends with training dosages and statistically significant negative correlation with board paddling sessions per week (r= -0.287, p=<0.05). Those with a history of SIP had a statistically significant higher number of sessions (p=0.008), duration (p=0.015) and distance (p=0.005) swimming per week.

    Conclusion

    Young surf lifesavers with a history of SIP have greater swimming dosage not associated with decrease in combined elevation score. More board paddling sessions per week decreased the combined elevation score of young surf lifesavers.

  • 2.
    Edouard, Pascal
    et al.
    University Hospital St Etienne, France; University of Lyon, France; French Athlet Federat FFA, France.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Alonso, Juan-Manuel
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Monaco; Qatar Orthoped and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Kowalski, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Sverker
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Karlsson, David
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Depiesse, Frederic
    French Athlet Federat FFA, France; Larrey Hospital University, France; European Athlet Assoc, Switzerland.
    Branco, Pedro
    Int Assoc Athlet Federat, Monaco; European Athlet Assoc, Switzerland.
    Extending in-competition Athletics injury and illness surveillance with pre-participation risk factor screening: A pilot study2015In: Physical Therapy in Sport, ISSN 1466-853X, E-ISSN 1873-1600, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 98-106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To explore the performance of retrospective health data collected from athletes before Athletics championships for the analysis of risk factors for in-competition injury and illness (IandI). Methods: For the 2013 European Athletics Indoor Championships, a self-report questionnaire (PHQ) was developed to record the health status of 127 athletes during the 4 weeks prior to the championship. Physician-based surveillance of in-competition IandI among all 577 athletes registered to compete was pursued during the championships. Results: 74 athletes (58.3%) from the sample submitted a complete PHQ, 21 (28%) of these athletes sustained at least one injury and/or illness during the championships. Training more than 12 h/week predisposed for sustaining an in-competition injury, and a recent health problem for in-competition illness. Among the 577 registered athletes, 60 injuries (104/1000 registered athletes) were reported. 31% of injuries were caused by the track, and 29% by overuse. 29 illnesses were reported (50/1000 registered athletes); upper respiratory tract infection and gastro-enteritis/diarrhoea were the most reported diagnoses. Conclusions: Pre-participation screening using athletes self-report PHQ showed promising results with regard to identification of individuals at risk. Indoor injury types could be attributed to extrinsic factors, such as small track size, track inclination, and race tactics. (C) 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Furness, James
    et al.
    Bond University. Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Climstein, Mike
    Bond University. Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia; The University of Sydney, Lidcombe, NSW, Australia.
    Sheppard, Jeremy M
    Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Australia; Hurley Surfing Australia High Performance Centre, Casuarina Beach, Australia.
    Abbott, Allan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Bond University. Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Hing, Wayne
    Bond University. Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia.
    Clinical methods to quantify trunk mobility in an elite male surfing population2016In: Physical Therapy in Sport, ISSN 1466-853X, E-ISSN 1873-1600, Vol. 19, p. 28-35Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    High numbers of acute shoulder and chronic lumbar injuries have been identified in a surfing population. A simple screening tool could be used to determine whether thoracic spine dysfunction is a possible contributor to shoulder or lumbar injuries. Importantly, thoracic mobility in the sagittal and horizontal planes are key requirements in the sport of surfing; however to date the normal values of these movements have not yet been quantified in a surfing population.

    Objectives

    To develop a reliable method to quantify thoracic mobility in the sagittal plane; to assess the reliability of a thoracic rotation method, and quantify thoracic mobility in an elite male surfing population.

    Design

    Clinical Measurement, reliability (repeated measures) and comparative study. Methods: 27 subjects were used to determine the reliability of a new method to assess thoracic mobility in the sagittal plane and 30 subjects were used to confirm the reliability of an existing thoracic rotation method. A total of 15 elite surfers were used as part of a comparative analysis with age and gender matched controls. Results: Intra-rater reliability (within and between session) intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) values ranged between 0.95 - 0.99 for both thoracic methods in the sagittal plane and between 0.95 – 0.98 for the rotation method. There was no significant difference in the amount of thoracic mobility in the sagittal plane between groups; however the elite surfing group had significantly (p ≤ 0.05) greater rotation than the comparative group (mean rotation 63.57° versus 40.80° respectively). Symmetry was also confirmed between left and right thoracic rotation in the elite surfing group (63.06 versus 64.01). Conclusion: This study has illustrated reliable methods to assess the thoracic spine in the sagittal and horizontal planes. It has also quantified ROM in a surfing cohort; identifying thoracic rotation as a key movement. This information may provide clinicians, coaches and athletic trainers with imperative information regarding the importance of maintaining adequate thoracic rotation and symmetry. From a screening perspective thoracic rotation should be assessed for performance purposes and to limit the potential for injury in the thoracic spine or in surrounding regions.

  • 4.
    Levinger, Pazit
    et al.
    Victoria University, Australia; Australian Institute Musculoskeletal Science AIMSS, Australia.
    Hallam, Karen
    Victoria University, Australia.
    Fraser, Darren
    Western Hospital, Australia.
    Pile, Rebecca
    Western Hospital, Australia.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. La Trobe University, Australia.
    Moreira, Brett
    Western Hospital, Australia.
    Talbot, Simon
    Western Hospital, Australia.
    A novel web-support intervention to promote recovery following Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction: A pilot randomised controlled trial2017In: Physical Therapy in Sport, ISSN 1466-853X, E-ISSN 1873-1600, Vol. 27, p. 29-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Self-efficacy is positively associated with adherence behaviours and rehabilitation outcomes following Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstruction. An internet resource can be an effective way to provide information, goal setting, patient monitoring and hence support overall self management. Purpose: This study examined the feasibility of a three month Internet-based intervention (mobile oriented site) to enhance recovery for patients, following ACL reconstruction. The potential effect of the internet-based intervention on knee pain, function, self-efficacy and fear of pain were also assessed. Method: This was a pilot randomised controlled trial (RCT) with pre and post intervention design (assessments at one week and three months following ACL reconstruction) comparing: (1) a control group and (2) an intervention group (internet-based intervention). A set of qualitative and quantitative assessments were included to evaluate potential improvements in self-efficacy, pain and function and perception of the internet intervention. Results and conclusion: Seventeen participants were available for analysis (n =10 intervention and n = 7 control group). Participants reported the internet-based intervention to be a useful tool for information, reminder and reinforcement for performing their exercise rehabilitation with 30.3% ( 35.3%) adherence to the internet-based intervention. No differences were observed between the groups over time on the outcome questionnaires (p amp;gt; 0.05). Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ANZCTR): ACTRN12616001379404. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

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