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  • 1.
    Ageberg, Eva
    et al.
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Bunke, Sofia
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Lucander, Karolina
    Lund Univ, Sweden.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Donaldson, Alex
    La Trobe Univ, Australia; Federat Univ Australia, Australia.
    Facilitators to support the implementation of injury prevention training in youth handball: A concept mapping approach2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 275-285Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a need for research to identify effective implementation strategies for injury prevention training within real-world community sports. The aim of this ecological participatory study was to identify facilitators, among stakeholders at multiple levels, that could help injury prevention training become part of regular training routines in youth team handball. Concept mapping, a mixed-method approach for qualitative data collection and quantitative data analysis, was used. Stakeholders (n = 196) of two community team handball clubs (29% players, 13% coaches, 38% caregivers, 11% club, district and national handball administrators, 9% unknown) participated in a brainstorming process. After the research team synthesized the 235 generated statements, 50 stakeholders (34% players, 22% coaches, 24% caregivers, 20% administrators) sorted 89 unique facilitator statements into clusters and rated them for importance and feasibility. Multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis yielded five clusters (stress value 0.231): "Understanding and applying knowledge," "Education, knowledge, and consistency," "Set-up and exercises," "Inspiration, motivation, and routines," and "Club policy and expert collaboration." The cluster "Understanding and applying knowledge" had the highest mean importance (3.17 out of 4) and feasibility (2.93) ratings. The 32 statements rated as both highly important and feasible (Go-zone) indicate action is required at the individual (end-users) and organizational (policymakers) levels to implement injury prevention training. Results suggest that developing evidence-based context-specific injury prevention training, incorporating physiological, biomechanical and psychological components, and an associated context-specific implementation plan in partnership with all stakeholders should be a high priority to facilitate the implementation of injury prevention training in youth team handball.

  • 2.
    Ardern, Clare
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. School of Allied Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Australia, Aspetar Orthopaedic and Sports Medicine Hospital, Doha, Qatar.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Forssblad, M
    Stockholm Sports Trauma Research Center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. Capio Artro Clinic, Sophiahemmet, Stockholm, Sweden..
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Comparison of patient-reported outcomes among those who chose ACL reconstruction or non-surgical treatment.2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 535-544Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of our study was to cross-sectionally compare patient-reported knee function outcomes between people who chose non-surgical treatment for ACL injury and those who chose ACL reconstruction. We extracted Knee Injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS) and EuroQoL-5D data entered into the Swedish National ACL Registry by patients with a non-surgically treated ACL injury within 180 days of injury (n = 306), 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) after injury. These data were compared cross-sectionally to data collected pre-operatively (n = 306) and at 1 (n = 350), 2 (n = 358), and 5 years (n = 114) post-operatively from age- and gender-matched groups of patients with primary ACL reconstruction. At the 1 and 2 year comparisons, patients who chose surgical treatment reported superior quality of life and function in sports (1 year mean difference 12.4 and 13.2 points, respectively; 2 year mean difference 4.5 and 6.9 points, respectively) compared to those who chose non-surgical treatment. Patients who chose ACL reconstruction reported superior outcomes for knee symptoms and function, and in knee-specific and health-related quality of life, compared to patients who chose non-surgical treatment.

  • 3.
    Bak, K
    et al.
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Gentofte Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Jorgensen, U
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Gentofte Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Scavenius, M
    Linkoping Univ Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Gentofte Hosp, Dept Orthopaed Surg, Div Sports Traumatol, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Reconstruction of anterior cruciate ligament deficient knees in soccer players with an iliotibial band autograft - A prospective study of 132 reconstructed knees followed for 4 (2-7) years2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 11, no 1, p. 16-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    One hundred and thirty-two consecutive soccer players (117 males and 15 females, median age 23, range 16-39 years) underwent primary reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) with an iliotibial band (ITB) autograft. AU patients were followed prospectively for a minimum of 2 years. One hundred and eighteen patients (89%) attended an independent observer follow-up after a median of 47 (24-92) months. The time before participating in soccer was a median of 7 (5-24) months. At a median of 4 years, 80 (68%) mere still active soccer players, while 38 had changed activity to a lower level. Twenty-five gave up soccer playing for reasons unrelated to the knee, and 13 (11%) gave up due to problems from the reconstructed knee. The Lysholm score improved from a median of 82 (range 42-99, mean [SD] 80.5 [+/-11.9]) points prior to the operation to a median of 99 (range 57-100, mean [SD] 94.6 [+/-8.5]) at followup. The Tegner score improved from a median of 3.5 (0-7) preoperatively to 9 (1-10), Four patients (3%) sustained a rupture of the graft: three ruptures occurred among the 15 females (20%), and one was seen among the 117 males (0.8%) (P=0.01). Eight per cent had predominantly minor cosmetic complaints from the donor-site hernia, while 51% had temporary discomfort from the staples used for graft fixation. Using the ITB autograft for ACL reconstruction, we found excellent and good results in soccer players with ACL deficiency and high demands for optimal knee function. The failure rate in general was comparable with other methods, and the majority was still active in soccer sports at a median of 4 years after surgery, An unacceptably high rerupture rate was registered in female players.

  • 4. Borjesson, Mats
    et al.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Untitled2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 376-377Other (Other academic)
  • 5.
    Boström, A.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thulin, K.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping.
    Fredriksson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science.
    Reese, D.
    IFK Norrköping, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Rockborn, Peter
    Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences.
    Hammar, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Risk factors for acute and overuse sport injuries in Swedish children 11 to 15 years old: What about resistance training with weights?2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 3, p. 317-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To determine the 1-year self-reported incidence of overuse and traumatic sport injuries and risk factors for injuries in children participating in a summer sports camp representing seven different sports. 4363 children, 11 to 15 years old participating in a summer camp in seven different sports answered a questionnaire. Injury in this cross-sectional study was defined as a sport-related trauma or overload leading to pain and dysfunction preventing the person from participation in training or competition for at least 1 week. A number of risk factors for injury were investigated such as sex, age, number of hours spent on training in general, and on resistance training with weights. Nearly half [49%, 95% confidence interval (CI) 48–51%] of the participants had been injured as a result of participation in a sport during the preceding year, significantly more boys than girls (53%, 95% CI 50–55% vs 46%, 95% CI 43–48%; P < 0.001). Three factors contributed to increased incidence of sport injuries: age, sex, and resistance training with weights. Time spent on resistance training with weights was significantly associated with sport injuries in a logistic regression analysis. In children age 11 to 15 years, the risk of having a sport-related injury increased with age and occurred more often in boys than in girls. Weight training was the only modifiable risk factor that contributed to a significant increase in the incidence of sport injuries.

  • 6.
    Börjesson, Mats
    et al.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Dellborg, Mikael
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Letter: Sports medicine update2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, p. 376-377Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Carlsson, Andreas
    et al.
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    The Swedish School of Sport and Health Sciences, Stockholm, Sweden.
    The Coaching Behaviour Scale for Sport (CBS-S): A psychometric evaluation of the Swedish version2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 1, p. 116-123Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study validated a Swedish version of the 47‐item Coaching Behavior Scale for Sport (CBS‐S). Sample 1 consisted of 506 team sport athletes [262 men and 244 women; mean age: 22.20, standard deviation (SD) = 3.90] distributed across 41 coaches at the two highest national levels of various sports. Athletes completed the CBS‐S and established questionnaires of coaching behaviors (LSS), self‐confidence (CSAI‐2R), and coach–athlete relationship (CART‐Q). An additional sample of 39 basketball players (21 men and 18 women; mean age = 17.40, SD = 2.39) completed the CBS‐S twice, approximately 4 weeks apart. Confirmatory factor analysis showed an acceptable model fit for the seven‐factor version of the CBS‐S, although two items of the negative personal rapport subscale displayed insufficient factor loadings. Correlations between the subscales of the CBS‐S and established instruments were in accordance with theoretical expectations, supporting the concurrent validity. Cronbach's alpha (> 0.82) for all dimensions provided support for the reliability of the CBS‐S, and test‐retest correlations indicated moderate stability over time. Cultural differences in the assessment of coaching behaviors and the usability of the CBS‐S by coaches for self‐reflection and development are discussed.

  • 8.
    Carlsson, E
    et al.
    1The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Ludvigsson, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Huus, K
    CHILD Research Group, Department of Nursing, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    Faresjö, M
    The Biomedical Platform, Department of Natural Science and Biomedicine, School of Health Sciences, Jönköping University, Jönköping.
    High physical activity in young children suggests positive effects by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 4, p. 441-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity in children is associated with several positive health outcomes such as decreased cardiovascular risk factors, improved lung function, enhanced motor skill development, healthier body composition, and also improved defense against inflammatory diseases. We examined how high physical activity vs a sedentary lifestyle in young children influences the immune response with focus on autoimmunity. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells, collected from 55 5-year-old children with either high physical activity (n = 14), average physical activity (n = 27), or low physical activity (n = 14), from the All Babies In Southeast Sweden (ABIS) cohort, were stimulated with antigens (tetanus toxoid and beta-lactoglobulin) and autoantigens (GAD65 , insulin, HSP60, and IA-2). Immune markers (cytokines and chemokines), C-peptide and proinsulin were analyzed. Children with high physical activity showed decreased immune activity toward the autoantigens GAD65 (IL-5, P < 0.05), HSP60 and IA-2 (IL-10, P < 0.05) and also low spontaneous pro-inflammatory immune activity (IL-6, IL-13, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and CCL2 (P < 0.05)) compared with children with an average or low physical activity. High physical activity in young children seems to have positive effects on the immune system by altering autoantigen-induced immune activity.

  • 9.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Center for Public Health.
    Overcoming the organization-practice barrier in sports injury prevention: A nonhierarchical organizational model2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 4, p. e414-e422Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The organization of sports at the national level has seldom been included in scientific discussions of sports injury prevention. The aim of this study was to develop a model for organization of sports that supports prevention of overuse injuries. The quality function deployment technique was applied in seminars over a two-season period to develop a national organizational structure for athletics in Sweden that facilitates prevention of overuse injuries. Three central features of the resulting model for organization of sports at the national level are (a) diminishment of the organizational hierarchy: participatory safety policy design is introduced through annual meetings where actors from different sectors of the sporting community discuss training, injury prevention, and sports safety policy; (b) introduction of a safety surveillance system: a ubiquitous system for routine collection of injury and illness data; and (c) an open forum for discussion of safety issues: maintenance of a safety forum for participants from different sectors of the sport. A nonhierarchical model for organization of sports at the national level - facilitated by modern information technology - adapted for the prevention of overuse injuries has been developed. Further research is warranted to evaluate the new organizational model in prospective effectiveness studies.

  • 10.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Fuller, C.W
    Centre for Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, UK.
    Comparison of injuries sustained on artificial turf and grass by male and female elite football players. 2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 824-832Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to compare incidences and patterns of injury for female and male elite teams when playing football on artificial turf and grass. Twenty teams (15 male, 5 female) playing home matches on third-generation artificial turf were followed prospectively; their injury risk when playing on artificial turf pitches was compared with the risk when playing on grass. Individual exposure, injuries (time loss) and injury severity were recorded by the team medical staff. In total, 2105 injuries were recorded during 246 000 h of exposure to football. Seventy-one percent of the injuries were traumatic and 29% overuse injuries. There were no significant differences in the nature of overuse injuries recorded on artificial turf and grass for either men or women. The incidence (injuries/1000 player-hours) of acute (traumatic) injuries did not differ significantly between artificial turf and grass, for men (match 22.4 v 21.7; RR 1.0 (95% CI 0.9–1.2); training 3.5 v 3.5; RR 1.0 (0.8–1.2)) or women [match 14.9 v 12.5; RR 1.2 (0.8–1.8); training 2.9 v 2.8; RR 1.0 (0.6–1.7)]. During matches, men were less likely to sustain a quadriceps strain (P=0.031) and more likely to sustain an ankle sprain (P=0.040) on artificial turf.

  • 11.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Karlsson, J
    The risk for injury in football. There is a need for a consensus about definition of the injury and the design of studies2003In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 147-149Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 12.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Torstveit, M. K.
    University of Agder.
    Stress fractures in elite male football players2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 22, no 3, p. 341-346Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to investigate the incidence, type and distribution of stress fractures in professional male football players. Fifty-four football teams, comprising 2379 players, were followed prospectively for 189 team seasons during the years 2001–2009. Team medical staff recorded individual player exposure and time-loss injuries. The first team squads of 24 clubs selected by UEFA as belonging to the 50 best European teams, 15 teams of the Swedish Super League and 15 teams playing their home matches on artificial turf pitches were included. In total, 51 stress fractures occurred during 1 180 000 h of exposure, giving an injury incidence of 0.04 injuries/1000 h. A team of 25 players can therefore expect one stress fracture every third season. All fractures affected the lower extremities and 78% the fifth metatarsal bone. Stress fractures to the fifth metatarsal bone, tibia or pelvis caused absences of 3–5 months. Twenty-nine percent of the stress fractures were re-injuries. Players that sustained stress fractures were significantly younger than those that did not. Stress fractures are rare in men's professional football but cause long absences. Younger age and intensive pre-season training appear to be risk factors.

  • 13.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Risk for injury when playing in a national football team.2004In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 14, no 1, p. 34-38Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish male senior national football team was followed prospectively between 1991 and 1997. During these 6 years, the team played 73 official matches and had three training camps. The senior author (J. E.) attended 57 of these matches and the three training camps and these matches and training camps, are included in the present study. Exposure to football was recorded individually for each player. The team physician examined all injuries. Total exposure was 7245 h (6235 training and 1010 match hours) and there were 71 injuries (40 training and 31 match injuries). Five (16%) of the match injuries were major, with more than 4 weeks of absence from football. The injury incidence during training was 6.5/1000 h and the injury risk during matchplay was 30.3/1000 h. A significantly higher injury incidence was found for matches lost compared to matches won or drawn (52.5 vs. 22.7/1000 h, P=0.026). No statistically significant difference for injury was found between competitive matches and friendly matches. No difference was found between home and away matches or matches on neutral ground. The risk for injury when playing in a national team compares with previously reported figures for professional football at a high level.

  • 14.
    Fahlgren, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Chubinskaya, S
    Messner, Karola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    A capsular incision leads to a fast osteoarthritic response, but also elevated levels of activated osteogenic protein-1 in rabbit knee joint cartilage2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 456-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We studied whether a small capsular incision alone, or combined with meniscectomy could induce early osteoarthritic changes in the rabbit knee. Thirty-one rabbits were operated on with a capsular incision in the left knee and meniscectomy in the right knee. Another 12 rabbits were used as controls. The rabbits were killed 3, 6 and 12 weeks after surgery. Osteoarthritic changes in the articular cartilage were evaluated by the modified Mankin score. The subchondral bone was evaluated by scintimetry (99mTc-HDP) and semiquantitative grading of histological changes. Osteogenic protein (OP-1) in its mature and pro-form was examined by immunohistochemistry. Both a capsular incision and meniscectomy induced articular cartilage fibrillation and increased bone metabolic activity during the initial weeks after surgery. Capsular incision led to lesser changes than meniscectomy. Mature OP-1 was elevated, and its pro-form reduced, in meniscectomized knees. A similar pattern was observed in knees with capsular incision. Already 3 weeks after surgery, the articular cartilage and subchondral bone showed typical signs of early osteoarthritis (OA), and a reparative response was suggested by increased intensity of OP-1 staining. As these signs were also found in knees with capsular incision only, it appears that trauma-related factors such as increased bleeding and inflammation are critical for the development of OA. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.

  • 15.
    Fuller, C.W.
    et al.
    Centre for Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, United Kingdom, Centre for Sports Medicine, University of Nottingham, Nottingham NG7 2UH, United Kingdom.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science.
    Junge, A.
    FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Andersen, T.E.
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Bahr, R.
    Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Oslo, Norway.
    Dvorak, J.
    FIFA-Medical Assessment and Research Centre, Schulthess Clinic, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Hagglund, M.
    McCrory, P.
    Centre for Health, Exercise and Sports Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Vic., Australia.
    Meeuwisse, W.H.
    Sport Injury Prevention Research Centre, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alta., Canada.
    Consensus statement on injury definitions and data collection procedures in studies of football (soccer) injuries2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 2, p. 83-92Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Variations in definitions and methodologies have created differences in the results and conclusions obtained from studies of football injuries, this has made inter-study comparisons difficult. An Injury Consensus Group was established under the auspices of FIFA Medical Assessment and Research Centre. Using a nominal group consensus model approach, a working document that identified the key issues related to definitions, methodology and implementation was discussed by members of the group during a 2-day meeting. Following this meeting, iterative draft statements were prepared and circulated to members of the group for comment before the final consensus statement was produced. Definitions of injury, recurrent injury, severity and training and match exposures in football together with criteria for classifying injuries in terms of location, type, diagnosis and causation are proposed. Proforma for recording players' baseline information, injuries and training and match exposures are presented. Recommendations are made on how the incidence of match and training injuries should be reported and a checklist of issues and information that should be included in published reports of studies of football injuries is presented. The definitions and methodology proposed in the consensus statement will ensure that consistent and comparable results will be obtained from studies of football injuries. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2006.

  • 16.
    Fältström, Anne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Factors associated with playing football after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction in female football players.2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1343-1352Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study investigated whether player-related factors (demographic, personality, or psychological factors) or the characteristics of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury were associated with the return to playing football in females after ACL reconstruction (ACLR). We also compared current knee function, knee related quality of life and readiness to return to sport between females who returned to football and those who had not returned. Females who sustained a primary ACL rupture while playing football and underwent ACLR 6-36 months ago were eligible. Of the 460 contacted, 274 (60%) completed a battery of questionnaires, and 182 were included a median of 18 months (IQR 13) after ACLR. Of these, 94 (52%) returned to football and were currently playing, and 88 (48%) had not returned. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified two factors associated with returning to football: short time between injury and ACLR (0-3 months, OR 5.6; 3-12 months OR 4.7 vs reference group > 12 months) and high motivation. Current players showed higher ratings for current knee function, knee-related quality of life, and psychological readiness to return to sport (P < 0.001). Undergoing ACLR sooner after injury and high motivation to return to sports may impact a player's return to football after ACLR.

  • 17.
    Hedman, Kristofer
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Tamás, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Henriksson, J
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Bjarnegård, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Cardiology in Linköping.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. County Hospital Kalmar.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Female athlete's heart: Systolic and diastolic function related to circulatory dimensions2015In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 372-381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There are relatively few studies on female athletes examining cardiac size and function and how these measures relate to maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max ). When determining sports eligibility, it is important to know what physiological adaptations and characteristics may be expected in female athletes, taking body and cardiac size into account. The purposes of this study were (a) to compare right and left heart dimensions and function in female endurance athletes (ATH) and in non-athletic female controls of similar age (CON); and (b) to explore how these measures related to VO2max . Forty-six ATH and 48 CON underwent a maximal bicycle exercise test and an echocardiographic examination at rest, including standard and color tissue Doppler investigation. All heart dimensions indexed for body size were larger in ATH (all P < 0.01). The diastolic mitral E/A ratio was 27% higher in ATH (P < 0.001) while systolic left and right atrio-ventricular longitudinal displacement was 7% (P = 0.002) and 15% (P < 0.001) larger in ATH, respectively. Half (50.3%) of the variability in VO2max could be explained by left ventricular end-diastolic volume. Our results could be useful in evaluating female endurance athletes with suspected cardiac disease and contribute to understanding differences between female athletes and non-athletes.

  • 18. Henriksson, M
    et al.
    Rockborn, P
    Good, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Range of motion training in brace vs. plaster immobilization after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction: A prospective randomized comparison with a 2-year follow-up2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 73-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The purpose of this prospective and randomized study was to compare rehabilitation with early range of motion (ROM) training vs immobilization following anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. Fifty patients, undergoing an ACL reconstruction with a bone-patellar tendon-bone graft, were postoperatively allocated randomly to either a plaster cast or a brace for 5 weeks. The brace group had ROM exercises from post-operative day 7. The commencement of ROM exercises was postponed 4 weeks for the plaster group compared to the brace group, but progressed subsequently with equal speed. There was no difference between the groups in the ROM of flexion or extension 20 weeks after the ACL reconstruction and later. Twenty-four months after surgery, the muscle strength deficit in the hamstring muscles (isokinetic measurements, percent difference, injured vs uninjured) was significantly larger in the brace group (mean +/- SD: 5.9 +/- 7.8%, P < 0.01) than in the plaster group (-0.9 +/- 11.8%, NS) (brace vs plaster group, P <0.05). Furthermore, there was also a tendency in the brace group to a larger strength deficit in the quadriceps muscle (brace: 11.1 +/- 13.2%, P <0.001, plaster: 3.8 +/- 12.9%, NS) (brace vs plaster group, P = 0.07). There was no difference between the groups in the total sagittal knee laxity, as measured with an arthrometer, or in the subjective knee function or activity level (Lysholm score together with the Tegner activity level) between the groups. It is concluded that the postoperative treatment with early range of motion training after ACL reconstruction gave as good ROM, knee stability, subjective knee function and activity level as the treatment with immobilization. It is hypothesized that the larger strength deficit observed after rehabilitation with early range of motion training is secondary to the more intensive training and physical therapist involvement that was demanded in order to achieve full ROM following immobilization.

  • 19. Hernelahti, M
    et al.
    Heinonen, OJ
    Karjalainen, J
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Börjesson, M
    Sudden cardiac death in young athletes: Time for a Nordic approach in screening?2008In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 18, no 2, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2005, the European Society of Cardiology published recommendations for cardiovascular screening in athletes. Discussion on whether screening is beneficial is ongoing. Recently, the first prospective results on effectiveness of screening in preventing sudden deaths were published from Italy. The results were supportive of screening, but did not provide conclusive evidence. Our suggestion for a Nordic approach on this issue is a directed cardiovascular examination initially involving elite athletes, because this is feasible with respect to the Nordic health care systems and the organization and logistics of elite competitive sports, but also because of the negative aspects of screening large populations. This directed cardiovascular examination would include personal and family history, clinical examination, and electrocardiography (ECG). Further examinations should thereafter be carried out in athletes with suggestive findings in the initial evaluation. The directed cardiovascular examination should be voluntary. It should be conducted at least once, with information on alarming symptoms (syncope, chest pain or dizziness during exercise) and heredity (sudden cardiac death or hereditary heart disease in near relatives) stressed to the athlete as indications for necessary check-ups in the future. The examination would also provide the athlete with an ECG recording, which is valuable as a reference at a later time. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  • 20.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Bergin, D.
    Swedish Athlet Assoc, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Nyce, J. M.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Injuries in youth track and field are perceived to have multiple-level causes that call for ecological (holistic-developmental) interventions: A national sporting community perceptions and experiences2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 1, p. 348-355Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Engaging in competitive sports as a youth can have many health benefits, but recent studies also report a high risk for injury. The long-term purpose of this Swedish research program is to develop a framework for safe track and field training for young athletes (aged 12-15years). The aim of this study was to establish what is perceived to contribute and cause injuries in youth track and field by compiling the best available experiential knowledge about the underlying factors and use this knowledge to identify appropriate areas to handle these in practical ways. Nine focus group interviews with in total 74 participants and confirming interviews with five individuals were performed in seven Swedish regions. Qualitative research methods were used for data analysis. Injuries in youth athletes were not considered to be strictly the result of individual factors but rather the result of the interactions between factors at different levels. Three major factors emerged as follows: Insufficient knowledge for athletic development in daily practice; shortsighted communities of practice and sports policies not adjusted to youth; and societal health behaviors. The experiential knowledge in the national sporting community suggests that if effective and sustainable injury prevention processes are to be implemented for youth track and field, an ecological (holistic-developmental) approach to injury prevention is needed. Such an approach allows a longitudinal development-focused strategy for prevention that spans an athletes entire career.

  • 21.
    Kallings, L V
    et al.
    Department of Neurobiologi KI.
    Leijon, Matti
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Hellénius, M L
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Ståhle, A
    Department of Neurobiologi Karolinska Institutet.
    Physical activity on prescription in primary health care: a follow-up of physical activity level and quality of life.2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      

  • 22.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Bjørneboe, John
    Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Waldén, Markus
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Andersen, Thor Einar
    Department of Sports Medicine, Oslo Sports Trauma Research Center, Norwegian School of Sport Sciences, Oslo, Norway.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Football Research Group, Linköping, Sweden.
    Injuries in male professional football: a prospective comparison between individual and team-based exposure registration2016In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 26, no 10, p. 1225-1232Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Methodological considerations of football injury epidemiology have only scarcely been described. The aim of this study was to evaluate the inter-rater agreement in injury capture rate and injury categorisation for data registered in two different prospective injury surveillance audits studying the same two Norwegian male professional football clubs for two consecutive seasons, 2008-2009. One audit used team-based exposure (TBE) recording and the other individual-based exposure (IBE). The number of injuries recorded and corresponding injury rates (injuries/1000 h exposure) were compared between audits. Cohen’s Kappa and Prevalence Adjusted Bias Adjusted Kappa (PABAK) coefficients were calculated for injury variables. Of 323 injuries included, the IBE audit captured 318 (overall capture rate 98.5%, training 98.9%, match 97.8%) and the TBE audit 303 injuries (overall capture rate 93.8%, training 91.4%, match 97.1%). Agreement analysis showed Kappa and PABAK coefficients regarded as almost perfect (> 0.81) for 8 of 9 injury variables, and substantial (ƙ 0.75) for the variable injury severity. In conclusion, the capture rate for training injuries was slightly higher with individual-based exposure recording, and inter-agreement in injury categorisation was very high.

  • 23.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Sagittal tibial translation during exercises in the anterior cruciate ligament-deficient knee2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 148-158Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to describe and compare the sagittal tibial translation and electromyographic activity of muscles v. medialis and lateralis, gastrocnemius and hamstrings, during common rehabilitation exercises, in patients with anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency and non-injured controls. Sagittal tibial translation was registered with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer, in 12 patients and 17 controls, during Lachman test (static translation) and five exercises (dynamic translation). The exercises were grouped according to muscle work and joint compression (active extension, heel raises, cycling, one-legged squat and chair squat). The non-weight-bearing exercise with isolated muscle work (active extension) produced a large amount of tibial translation. During weight bearing, the total anterior-posterior tibial motion was halved compared to the non-weight-bearing exercises, but tibia was anterior positioned. Heel raising resulted in equal translation as the one-legged squat and chair squat, whereas cycling produced the smal-lest amount of tibial translation. The subjects utilized different amounts of their individual joint play (static translation) during the exercises, which may explain why there are no correlation between static translation and the patients functional outcome. These results enhance understanding on tibial translation during activity and gives indications on which exercises can be used early after ACL injury and reconstruction. Copyright © Blackwell Munksgaard 2004.

  • 24.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gillquist, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Sports Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anterior tibial translation during eccentric, isokinetic quadriceps work in healthy subjects1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 9, no 4, p. 189-194Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The effect of increasing isokinetic, eccentric quadriceps torques on sagittal translation of the tibia was examined in six healthy volunteers and compared to the translation at 20° of knee flexion during a drawer test with 90 N force. The tibial translation increased in a linear fashion with a mean of 0.5 mm per 20% torque increase. In 20° of knee flexion, 10% of eccentric quadriceps peak torque consumed 80% of the anterior tibial translation induced by the 90 N Lachman test while eccentric quadriceps peak torque utilized 100% of the translation at the same test. The in vivo relation between muscle force and tibial translation is of importance in the treatment of patients with injury to the cruciate ligaments. The results indicate that an already low eccentric quadriceps torque causes a tibial translation that reaches the limit of the passive knee joint displacement where strain is assumed to develop in the anterior cruciate ligament. Already low eccentric quadriceps torque levels may therefore be harmful during rehabilitation after anterior cruciate ligament surgery.

  • 25.
    Kvist, Joanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Webster, K
    La Trobe University, Australia .
    Ardern, C
    La Trobe University, Australia .
    Translation and measurement properties of the Swedish version of ACL-Return to Sports after Injury questionnaire2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 23, no 5, p. 568-575Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psychological factors may be a hindrance for returning to sport after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The ACL-Return to Sport after Injury scale (ACL-RSI) measures athletes emotions, confidence in performance, and risk appraisal in relation to return to sport. The aim of this study was to translate the ACL-RSI scale from English to Swedish and to examine some of the measurement properties of the Swedish version. The ACL-RSI was translated and culturally adapted. A professional expert group and five patients evaluated face validity. One hundred and eighty-two patients completed the translated ACL-RSI, a project-specific questionnaire, the Tampa Scale of Kinesiophobia (TSK), the Knee-Self-Efficacy Scale (K-SES), the Multidimensional Health Locus of Control (MHLC-C), the Knee injury and Osteoarthritis Outcome Score (KOOS), and the Anterior Cruciate Ligament-Quality of Life (ACL-QoL) questionnaires. Fifty-three patients answered the ACL-RSI twice to examine reproducibility. The ACL-RSI showed good face validity, internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha=0.948), low floor and ceiling effects and high construct validity when evaluated against the TSK, K-SES, MHLC-C, KOOS, and ACL-QoL scales. The reproducibility was also high (intra-class correlation=0.893). Therefore, the ACL-RSI can be used to evaluate psychological factors relevant to returning to sport after ACL reconstruction surgery.

  • 26.
    Leijon, Matti E.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Department of Medical Specialist.
    Nilsen, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Festin, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ståhle, A.
    Karolinska Institutet, Sweden .
    Does a physical activity referral scheme improve the physical activity among routine primary health care patients?2009In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 19, no 5, p. 627-636Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Physical activity referral (PAR) schemes or concepts occur in varying forms. Because few physical activity intervention studies have been carried out in routine health care settings, it is difficult to translate research findings into daily practice. The aim of this study was to analyze the effectiveness of a PAR scheme implemented in routine primary health care. The study did not include a control group and was based on the ordinary staff's work efforts and follow-up measures. During a 2-year period, 6300 PARs were issued. Effectiveness was measured by an increase in self-reported physical activity. Half of the patients reached reported increased physical activity both at 3 months (49%) and at 12 months (52%). The proportion of inactive patients decreased from 33% at baseline to 17% at 3 months and 20% at 12 months. The proportion of patients who were physically active on a regular basis increased from 22% at baseline to 33% at 3 months and 32% at 12 months. Neither the patient's age nor the profession of the prescriber was associated with differences in effectiveness. The patient's activity level at baseline, the type of physical activity as well as the reason for the prescription were associated with increased physical activity.

  • 27.
    Lindblom, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Carlfjord, Siw
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Adoption and use of an injury prevention exercise program in female football: A qualitative study among coaches2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1295-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study focuses on an injury prevention exercise program (IPEP), Knee Control, which has been shown to reduce the incidence of acute knee injury in female adolescent football players. The aim was to explore the factors influencing coaches adoption and use of Knee Control within female football in Sweden. This was a qualitative study involving interviews with 20 strategically selected coaches for female football teams, predominantly adolescent teams. The semi-structured interview guide was influenced by the Health Belief Model, and an ecological perspective was adopted during the interviews. Interviews were analyzed with qualitative content analysis. The results illustrate the different influences that interact on adoption and use of Knee Control by coaches. The coaches described themselves as crucial for Knee Control adoption and use, but external facilitators and barriers such as resources for training, social support from other coaches, clubs and football associations and player buy-in were also described as important. Knee Control characteristics, such as how well the program fit the team, also influenced use of Knee Control. Many coaches modified the program to improve player buy-in and Knee Control fit. Such modifications may risk compromising the preventive effect but may increase feasibility, that is the ease of using Knee Control, and thereby long-term use. These findings may guide the design and delivery of future IPEPs, and improve use of Knee Control, for example, by expanding the program to fit different target groups and supporting coaches and players in the use of Knee Control.

  • 28.
    Lundin, Anna-Carin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Eliasson, Pernilla T.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Trigger finger, tendinosis, and intratendinous gene expression2014In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 24, no 2, p. 363-368Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The pathogenesis of trigger finger has generally been ascribed to primary changes in the first annular ligament. In contrast, we recently found histological changes in the tendons, similar to the findings in Achilles tendinosis or tendinopathy. We therefore hypothesized that trigger finger tendons would show differences in gene expression in comparison to normal tendons in a pattern similar to what is published for Achilles tendinosis. We performed quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction on biopsies from finger flexor tendons, 13 trigger fingers and 13 apparently healthy control tendons, to assess the expression of 10 genes which have been described to be differently expressed in tendinosis (collagen type 1a1, collagen 3a1, MMP-2, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, TIMP-3, aggrecan, biglycan, decorin, and versican). In trigger finger tendons, collagen types 1a1 and 3a1, aggrecan and biglycan were all up-regulated, and MMP-3and TIMP-3 were down-regulated. These changes were statistically significant and have been previously described for Achilles tendinosis. The remaining four genes were not significantly altered. The changes in gene expression support the hypothesis that trigger finger is a form of tendinosis. Because trigger finger is a common condition, often treated surgically, it could provide opportunities for clinical research on tendinosis.

  • 29.
    Lundqvist, Carolina
    et al.
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Kenttä, Göran
    Gymnastik och idrottshögskolan, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Raglin, J.S
    Indiana University‐Bloomington, Bloomington, Indiana, USA.
    Directional anxiety responses in elite and sub-elite young athletes: Intensity of anxiety symptoms matter2011In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 21, no 6, p. 853-862Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective was to examine the differences in anxiety ratings of elite and sub‐elite athletes when the relationship between intensity and direction scores of anxiety ratings is considered in analyses. Participants were 31 junior elite (Mean age: 17.7, SD=1.1) and 53 sub‐elite (Mean age: 17.5, SD=1.1) cross country skiers and swimmers who completed the direction modified CSAI‐2R before important competitions. Results showed that elite athletes rated a higher percent of items as facilitative to their performance whereas sub‐elite athletes rated a higher percent of items as debilitative. No significant differences between the elite and sub‐elite samples were displayed regarding rated direction scores of cognitive or somatic anxiety at moderate to high‐intensity levels. A significant difference in facilitative anxiety ratings was displayed at a low anxiety intensity level (Z=−2.20, P<0.05). Outcome performance data showed no consistent congruence with athletes' anxiety direction ratings. The findings suggest that facilitative direction scores are a consequence of low anxiety intensity, possibly combined with high self‐confidence levels. Directional anxiety researchers analyzing separate total scores of intensity and direction respectively, which is the traditional approach, may draw incorrect conclusions about the importance of facilitative ratings of anxiety symptoms.

  • 30.
    Messner, Karola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Meniscal regeneration or meniscal transplantation?1999In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 9, p. 162-167Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 31.
    Messner, Karola
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Roos, H
    Linkoping Univ, Fac Hlth Sci, Div Sports Med, Dept Neurosci & Locomot, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Helsinborg Hosp, Dept Orthoped Surg, SE-25187 Helsinborg, Sweden.
    Untitled2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 183-185Other (Other academic)
  • 32.
    Meunier, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Odensten, M
    Good, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Long-term results after primary repair or non-surgical treatment of anterior cruciate ligament rupture: A randomized study with a 15-year follow-up2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 230-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the long-term outcome of 100 patients 15 years after having been randomly allocated to primary repair (augmented or non-augmented) or non-surgical treatment of an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) rupture. The subjective outcome was similar between the groups, with no difference regarding activity level and knee-injury and osteoarthritis outcome score but with a slightly lower Lysholm score for the non-surgically treated group. This difference was attributed to more instability symptoms. The radiological osteoarthritis (OA) frequency did not differ between surgically or non-surgically treated patients, but if a meniscectomy was performed, two-thirds of the patients showed OA changes regardless of initial treatment of the ACL. There were significantly more meniscus injuries in patients initially treated non-surgically. One-third of the patients in the non-surgically treated group underwent secondary ACL reconstruction due to instability problems. In this study, ACL repair itself could not reduce the risk of OA nor increase the subjective outcome scores. However, one-third of the non-surgical treated patients were later ACL reconstructed due to instability. The status of the menisci was found to be the most important predictor of developing OA. Early ACL repair and also ACL reconstruction can reduce the risk of secondary meniscus tears. Indirectly this supports the hypothesis that early stabilization of the knee after ACL injury is advantageous for the long-term outcome. © COPYRIGHT © BLACKWELL MUNKSGAARD 2006.

  • 33.
    Migueles, Jairo H.
    et al.
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Cadenas-Sanchez, Cristina
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Tudor-Locke, Catrine
    Univ Massachusetts, MA 01003 USA.
    Löf, Marie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Esteban-Cornejo, Irene
    Univ Granada, Spain; Northeastern Univ, MA 02115 USA.
    Molina-Garcia, Pablo
    Univ Granada, Spain; Univ Leuven, Belgium.
    Mora-Gonzalez, Jose
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Rodriguez-Ayllon, Maria
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Garcia-Marmol, Eduardo
    Univ Granada, Spain.
    Ekelund, Ulf
    Norwegian Sch Sport Sci, Norway.
    Ortega, Francisco B.
    Univ Granada, Spain; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Comparability of published cut-points for the assessment of physical activity: Implications for data harmonization2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 566-574Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study aimed to compare estimations of sedentary time (SED) and time spent in physical activity (PA) intensities in children with overweight/obesity across different age-appropriate cut-points based on different body-worn attachment sites and acceleration metrics. A total of 104 overweight/obese children (10.1 +/- 1.1 years old, 43 girls) concurrently wore ActiGraph GT3X+ accelerometers on their right hip and non-dominant wrist for 7 days (24 hours). Euclidean norm -1 g (ENMO) and activity counts from both vertical axis (VACounts) and vector magnitude (VMCounts) were derived. We calculated estimates of SED and light, moderate, vigorous, and moderate-to-vigorous (MVPA) intensity PA using different published cut-points for children. The prevalence of children meeting the recommended 60 min/d of MVPA was calculated. The time spent in SED and the different PA intensities largely differed across cut-points based on different attachment sites and acceleration metrics (ie, SED = 11-252 min/d; light PA = 10-217 min/d; moderate PA = 1-48 min/d; vigorous PA = 1-35 min/d; MVPA = 4-66 min/d). Consequently, the prevalence of children meeting the recommended 60 min/d of MVPA varied from 8% to 96% of the study sample. The present study provides a comprehensive comparison between available cut-points for different attachment and acceleration metrics in children. Furthermore, our data clearly show that it is not possible (and probably will never be) to know the prevalence of meeting the PA guidelines based on accelerometer data since apparent differences range from almost zero to nearly everyone meeting the guidelines.

  • 34.
    Rodriguez-Serrano, L. I.
    et al.
    Linköping University.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Ekberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Business support and Development, Department of Health and Care Development.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Jacobsson, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Young athletes health knowledge system: Qualitative analysis of health learning processes in adolescent sportspersons2018In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 1272-1280Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Recognized side effects on health associated with sports participation in youth include overtraining, doping, and exposure to harassment and violence. Many of these effects originate in contexts where young athletes are beginning to make decisions about their sports practices on their own. This study sets out to explore knowledge and reasoning about health among adolescent athletes and to describe how health knowledge management structures are associated with different social systems. Qualitative data were collected from focus groups involving 65 young Swedish athletes aged 16-17years. The participants knowledge and reasoning about health were examined using a deductive thematic analysis, categories from Blooms taxonomy of educational objectives, and Luhmanns social systems theory. The meaning of health was found to have a dynamic character for the young athletes, associated with constantly striving to satisfy immediate needs and fulfill short-time life goals. The athletes thinking about health was associated with a pragmatic health-as-a-resource perspective, characterized by group self-comparisons, rapid cognitive processing, and opportunistic substitutions. They expressed a particular interest in experiential learning and personally relevant procedural knowledge, and they perceived that their factual knowledge about health was saturated. The results of this study add emphasis to the importance of involving adolescent sportspersons in the development of health education programs and contextualizing the programs to the athletes specific age and social environment.

  • 35.
    Räsänen, T.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Messner, Karola
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Estrogen-dependent tensile properties of the rabbit knee medial collateral ligament2000In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 20-27Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The influence of oophorectomy or continuous administration of estradiol on the tensile properties of the rabbit knee medial collateral ligament was investigated. Young postpubertal female New Zealand white rabbits were either oophorectomized or underwent a sham operation. The sham-operated animals received in addition a daily dosage of 4 mg 17▀-estradiol. After 5 months the animals were killed, and the material properties of the bone-ligament- bone complex in one knee were determined using a material testing machine and video system, and compared to non-treated control animals. There was no difference in elastic modulus between the groups. However, the ligaments from low-dose estrogen-treated animals had a smaller cross-sectional area and a higher ultimate tensile strength than those from controls or oophorectomized rabbits (P<0.04-0.0003).

  • 36.
    Schepull, Torsten
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Early E-modulus of healing Achilles tendons correlates with late function: Similar results with or without surgery2012In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 22, no 1, p. 18-23Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Non-operative treatment of Achilles tendon ruptures is associated with an increased risk of rerupture. We hypothesized that this is due to inferior mechanical properties during an early phase of healing, and performed a randomized trial, using a new method to measure the mechanical properties. Tantalum markers were inserted in the tendon stumps, and tendon strain at different loadings was measured by stereo-radiography (Roentgen stereophotogrammetric analysis) at 3, 7 and 19 weeks and 18 months after injury. Thirty patients were randomized to operative or non-operative treatment. The primary out-come variable was an estimate for the modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks. Strain per force, cross-sectional area and tendon elongation were also measured. The functional outcome variable was the heel-raise index after 18 months. There was no difference in the mean modulus of elasticity or other mechanical or functional variables between operative and non-operative treatments at any time-point, but strain per force at 7 and 19 weeks had a significantly larger variation in the non-operative group. This group, therefore, might contain more outliers with poor healing. The modulus of elasticity at 7 weeks correlated with the heel-raise index after 18 months in both treatment groups (r2=0.75; P=0.0001). This correlation is an intriguing finding.

  • 37.
    Schilcher, Jörg
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Bernhardsson, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Chronic anterior tibial stress fractures in athletes: No crack but intense remodelling2019In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    PURPOSE: Delayed healing of anterior tibial stress fractures in athletes is related to high tensional forces acting across a putative fracture gap. These forces lead to crack propagation and create strains that exceed tissue differentiation thresholds for new bone to form in the gap. The "dreaded black line" is a radiographic hallmark sign of stress fractures considered to represent a transverse fracture gap. However, whether a fracture gap truly exists at the microscopic level remains unclear. The aim of this study was to describe the area of the "dreaded black line" microscopically and to identify signs of delayed healing.

    METHODS: Between 2011 and 2016 we included seven athletes with chronic anterior mid-shaft tibial stress fractures. The fracture site was excised as a cylindrical biopsy. The biopsy was evaluated with micro-CT and histology. The formation of new bone in the defect was evaluated radiographically.

    RESULTS: The "dreaded black line" seen on preoperative radiographs in all patients could not be seen on the microscopic level. Instead, the area of the putative crack showed widened resorption cavities, lined with active osteoblasts, and surrounded by immature bone. This area of intense remodelling seemed to create a false impression of a fracture line on radiographs. Complete cortical continuity was restored at the biopsy site at median eight months (range six to 13 months).

    CONCLUSION: Tibial stress fractures in athletes normally show no fracture defect, but a region of increased remodelling. The healing process is already ongoing but seems mechanically insufficient. 

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-05-18 11:04
  • 38.
    Skargren, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Effects of an exercise program on musculoskeletal symptoms and physical capacity among nursing staff1996In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 6, p. 122-130Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 39.
    Svernlöv, Birgitta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Adolfsson, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Non-operative treatment regime including eccentric training for lateral humeral epicondylalgia2001In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 11, no 6, p. 328-334Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a pilot study 38 patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia were randomly allocated to two treatment groups. Group S (stretching) was treated with a contract-relax-stretching program while group E (eccentric exercise) underwent an eccentric exercise program. Both groups also received forearm bands and wrist support nightly. The programs were carried out daily at home during 12 weeks. Evaluation before and 3, 6 and 12 months after treatment, included subjective assessment of symptoms using visual analogue scales and grip strength measurements. Thirty-five patients were available for follow-up. Five patients, three in group S and two in group E, did not complete the programs due to increased pain while 30 (86%) reported complete recovery or improvement. Reduced pain and increased grip strength were seen in both treatment groups but 12 out of 17 patients (71%) in group E rated themselves as completely recovered as compared to 7 out of 18 (39%) in group S (P=0.09), and in group E the increase in grip strength after 6 months was statistically significantly larger than in group S. In a second study the eccentric training regime was used in a consecutive series of 129 patients with lateral epicondy lalgia. The patients were divided into two groups with one group consisting of patients with less than one year duration of symtoms and the other comprised patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year. The results of treatment were evaluated in the same way as in the pilot study, and also after 3.4 years using the scoring system by Verhaar et al. At the end of the treatment period statistically significant improvements were seen in all VAS recordings and in grip strength. After 3.4 years 38% had excellent, 28% good, 25% fair and 9% poor results according to the score. In the self-rated outcome 54% regarded themselves as completely recovered, 43% improved, 2% unchanged and 2% worse. No significant differences were seen between patients with a duration of symptoms for more than one year compared to patients with symptoms for less than one year. The eccentric training regime can considerably reduce symptoms in a majority of patients with lateral humeral epicondylalgia, regardless of duration, and is possibly superior to conventional stretching.

  • 40.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Physiotherapy.
    Passive and dynamic translation in the knee is not influenced by knee exercises in healthy individuals2005In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 139-147Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    No evidence exists that repeated isolated quadriceps contractions lead to increased sagittal plane tibial translation. The purpose was to analyze passive and dynamic tibial translation before, during and after a specific exercise session, including cycling and a maximum number of knee extensions and heel-raises, in healthy individuals. Passive and dynamic sagittal tibial translation was measured on 18 healthy individuals (nine men and nine women) before, during and after a specific exercise session with heavy load, including cycling and maximum number of knee extensions and heel-raises. Sagittal tibial translation during the Lachman test, maximal isometric quadriceps contraction, one-legged squat and gait was registered with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer. The electromyographic (EMG) activity of m. vastus medialis and lateralis, m. gastrocnemius and mm. hamstrings was registered. There was no difference in passive or dynamic sagittal tibial translation during or after the exercise session. No difference could be detected in EMG activity during squat after compared with before the exercise session. In conclusion, the knee exercises did not influence the amount of translation in healthy individuals. The findings indicate that isolated strength training of quadriceps may be included in anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs, even if further specific studies on injured individuals most be performed.

  • 41.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Öberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tibial translation and muscle activation during rehabilitation exercises 5 weeks after anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction2010In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 154-164Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: It is unclear which rehabilitation exercises involve adequate muscle activationwithout excessive anterior tibial translation after ACL reconstruction.

    Hypothesis: ACL reconstruction will reduce dynamic tibial translation to the level observedin the uninjured knee. The muscle recruitment pattern will be altered 5 weeks after ACLreconstruction, and some rehabilitation exercises will be more beneficial than others due tovarying amounts of dynamic tibial translation and muscle activation.

    Study Design: Descriptive Laboratory Study.

    Methods: Sagittal tibial translation and muscle activation were measured with the Lachmantest (static translation) and 7 rehabilitation exercises (dynamic translation) in 19 patients.Results obtained 5 weeks after ACL reconstruction were compared to those obtained beforethe injury (ACL-deficient knee) and in the uninjured knee.

    Results: Five weeks after ACL reconstruction the seated knee extension producedsignificantly more anterior tibial translation than the straight leg raise and standing on one leg.The static and dynamic tibial translations measured in ACL reconstructed knees were similarto those measured in uninjured knees. After ACL reconstruction, the patients used a jointstiffening strategy that employed more hamstring activation and reduced the dynamic tibialtranslation.

    Conclusions: ACL reconstruction reduced dynamic tibial translation compared to thatobserved before treatment. The muscle recruitment pattern in exercises was altered after ACLreconstruction.

  • 42.
    Thelin, Nils
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Holmberg, S.
    Kronoberg County Council.
    Thelin, A.
    Uppsala University.
    Knee injuries account for the sports-related increased risk of knee osteoarthritis2006In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 329-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Increased risk of osteoarthritis has been found among athletes active in different kinds of sports. Knee injury is an established risk factor for knee osteoarthritis. In this population-based case-control study we investigated the risk of knee osteoarthritis with respect to sports activity and previous knee injuries. A total of 825 cases with x-ray-verified femorotibial osteoarthritis were identified at six hospitals in southern Sweden. The cases were matched (age, sex and residential area) with 825 controls from the general population. Mailed questionnaire data on sports activity for more than 1 year after the age of 16, knee injuries and confounding variables (weight, height, heredity, smoking and occupation) were collected and analyzed using logistic regression models. The response frequency was 89%. Among men knee osteoarthritis was related to soccer (odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-2.2), ice hockey (OR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.0) and tennis (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.1-3.8) but not to track and field sports, cross-country skiing, and orienteering. After adjustment for confounding variables soccer and ice hockey remained significantly related to knee osteoarthritis, but after adjustment for knee injuries no significant relation remained. The sports-related increased risk for knee osteoarthritis was explained by knee injuries.

  • 43.
    Tigerstrand Grevnerts, Hanna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Gravare Silbernagel, K.
    University of Delaware, DE USA.
    Tagesson (Sonesson), Sofi
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Department of Activity and Health.
    Ardern, Clare
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Aspetar Orthopaed and Sports Medical Hospital, Qatar.
    Österberg, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gauffin, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Orthopaedics in Linköping.
    Kvist, Joanna
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Translation and testing of measurement properties of the Swedish version of the IKDC subjective knee form2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 554-562Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To translate to Swedish language and cross-culturally adapt the IKDC-SKF and to test the measurement properties of the Swedish version of IKDC-SKF in ACL-injured patients undergoing reconstruction surgery.The translation and cross-cultural adaption was performed according to guidelines. Seventy-six patients with an ACL injury filled out the IKDC-SKF and other questionnaires before ACL reconstruction and at 4, 6, and 12months after surgery. A total of 203 patients from the Swedish ACL Registry participated at 8months post-operative. Measurement properties were tested according to the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health Measurement INstruments (COSMIN) guidelines.The Swedish IKDC-SKF had high internal consistency (Cronbachs alpha=0.90) and test-retest reliability (ICC2,1=0.92, CI 95%: 0.81-0.97, Pamp;lt;.001). A single factor solution accounted for 46.1% of the variance in IKDC-SKF scores. Criterion validity was moderate to high. All ten predefined hypotheses for hypothesis testing were confirmed. The six hypotheses for responsiveness testing were confirmed. The effect size was 1.8, the standardized response mean was 1.9, the and minimal clinically important difference was 13.9 points.The Swedish version of the IKDC-SKF had good measurement properties and can be recommended for use in a population of ACL-deficient patients undergoing ACL reconstruction.

  • 44.
    Timpka, Toomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Department of Health and Society, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Public Health Sciences, Centre for Public Health Sciences.
    Risto, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Orthopaedic Centre, Department of Orthopaedics Linköping.
    Borg, K
    Johansson, J
    Injury incidence in a men's elite bandy league: An epidemiological study of a full regular season2007In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 17, no 6, p. 636-640Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Bandy is a popular European winter team-sport. The best bandy teams participate in semi-professional leagues, where the play-off games attract more than 10 000 spectators. Injury patterns in elite bandy have not been investigated previously. The aim of this study is to examine the incidence and types of injuries sustained during elite bandy games for men. Twelve of the 16 teams in the Swedish elite bandy league during the 2002 season participated in the study. In total, 36 injuries were recorded, corresponding to 7.3 injuries/1000 player game hours and 5.7 injuries/1000 athlete exposures. Collision was the most common injury cause (47%), while contusion was the most common injury type (25%), followed by fracture (22%) and ligament rupture (19%). The study showed that the injury incidence in elite bandy is low, but also that the injuries that are still sustained are relatively severe. This pattern can be explained by the fact that even though bandy rules do not allow body checks, collisions between skaters moving at high speeds still cause the majority of injuries. Further studies of the injury rehabilitation practices, and the implementation and evaluation of safety programs in elite bandy are warranted. © 2007 Blackwell Munksgaard.

  • 45.
    Tranaeus, U.
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Heintz, Emelie
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Swedish Council Health Technology Assessment, Sweden.
    Johnson, U.
    Halmstad University, Sweden.
    Forssblad, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Werner, S.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Injuries in Swedish floorball: a cost analysis2017In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 508-513Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The epidemiology of sport injuries is well documented. However, the costs are rarely discussed. Previous studies have presented such costs in specific sports or localization. No study has investigated the costs related to injuries in elite floorball. Thus, the aim of this study was to estimate cost of injuries in Swedish elite floorball players. During 1year, 346 floorball players were prospectively followed. All time-loss injures were recorded. The injured players were asked to complete a questionnaire regarding their costs tied to the injury. Mean costs were calculated by multiplying the total resource use with the collected unit costs and dividing these total costs with the number of injuries as well as players. The results showed that the average cost per injury increased with the level of severity and ranged from 332 to 2358 Euros. The mild and moderate overuse injuries were costlier than the corresponding traumatic injuries. However, the severe traumatic injuries were associated with higher costs than overuse injuries. Knee injuries were the costliest. Our results indicate that there are costs to be saved, if floorball injuries can be avoided. They should be of interest to decision makers deciding whether to invest in preventive interventions.

  • 46.
    Vergis, Anil
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Hammerby, S
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Radiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology UHL.
    Gillquist, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Neuroscience and Locomotion, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine.
    Fluoroscopic validation of electrogoniometrically measured femorotibial translation in healthy and ACL deficient subjects2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 12, no 4, p. 223-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Equipment which measure femorotibial motions indirectly by using a patellar pad are reported to have errors caused by deformation of soft tissues and slippage of the device. For the purpose of validation, the tibial translation in relation to the femur per degree of knee extension was estimated from the slope coefficients of the flexion-displacement curve, obtained by both fluoroscopic and electrogoniometric tests, in the knee of the dominant limb in healthy subjects and in both knees of patients with unilateral anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) deficiency. In addition, the anterior and posterior static knee laxity limits and the tibial resting position were evaluated. Within all knee groups, the tibia moved posteriorly in relation to the femur during extension. The measured movement was similar both with the electrogoniometer and with fluoroscopy thereby indicating that sagittal plane knee translation measurements with the CA-4000 electrogoniometer are reliable and in good agreement with the X-ray measurements, even though the measurements were made separately. The ACL injured knees showed approximately 20% smaller posterior movement of tibia in relation to femur per degree change of knee extension than the non-injured or control knees (p < 0.05) and a more anterior resting position of the tibia relative to femur as compared to the contralateral healthy knee during knee laxity testing (p = 0.002).

  • 47.
    Waldén, Markus
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hägglund, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Orchard, J
    University of Sydney, Australia.
    Kristenson, Karolina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekstrand, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Regional differences in injury incidence in European professional football2013In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 424-430Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The objective of this study was to investigate regional differences in injury incidence in men's professional football in Europe. A nine-season prospective cohort study was carried out between 2001–2002 and 2009–2010 involving 1357 players in 25 teams from nine countries. Teams were categorized into different regions according to the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system. Teams from the northern parts of Europe (n = 20) had higher incidences of injury overall [rate ratio 1.12, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.06 to 1.20], training injury (rate ratio 1.16, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.27), and severe injury (rate ratio 1.29, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.52), all statistically significant, compared to teams from more southern parts (n  = 5). In contrast, the anterior cruciate ligament injury incidence was lower in the northern European teams with a statistically significant difference (rate ratio 0.43, 95% CI 0.25 to 0.77), especially for noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury (rate ratio 0.19, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.39). In conclusion, this study suggests that there are regional differences in injury incidence of European professional football. However, further studies are needed to identify the underlying causes.

  • 48.
    Wernstedt, Pernilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Sjöstedt, Camilla
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Ekman, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Du, Hongkai
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Thuomas, Karl Åke
    Sabbatsberg.
    Areskog, Nils Holger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology.
    Nylander, Eva
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Clinical Physiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology.
    Adaptation of cardiac morphology and function to endurance and strength training: A comparative study using MR imaging and echocardiography in males and females2002In: Scandinavian Journal of Medicine and Science in Sports, ISSN 0905-7188, E-ISSN 1600-0838, Vol. 12, no 1, p. 17-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Left ventricular (LV) dimensions and function and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max) were measured in endurance-trained (10 male, m, 10 female, f), strength-trained athletes (8 m, 10 f) and untrained subjects (9 m, 10 f). LV dimensions were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and echocardiography and the results were equal irrespective of method. Endurance-trained m and f had significantly higher LV volumes and mass than both strength-trained and controls. No VO2 max or dimensional differences were seen between strength-trained and untrained subjects. In endurance-trained males, LV volumes and mass/kg bw were higher than in endurancetrained females. There was no significant gender difference for strength-trained or untrained subjects regarding body weight-related heart dimensions. It is concluded that LV dimensions and volumes are strongly dependent on oxygen transport capacity in normal subjects practising different modes of training, and that the gender differences, if LV dimensions are related to aerobic work capacity, are smaller than previously reported.

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