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  • 1.
    Arvola, Mattias
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Grading in interaction design education using design practitioners conceptions of process quality2012In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 472-481Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The designed product is often assessed in interaction design education, but there are also courses that focus on learning the design process. It is then necessary to develop criteria for grading in such courses. To make a successful transfer from theory to practice, students also need to learn the criteria practitioners use, rather than the criteria that academically oriented teachers use. To do this, one approach is to align criteria with the conceptions practicing interaction designers have of process quality in design. Therefore, the research questions for this study are what those conceptions are, and how they can be utilized in grading criteria for interaction design projects in education. Interviews were made with 10 interaction designers. The interviews were qualitatively analyzed. The results demonstrate that practicing interaction designers conceptualize the quality of the design process in three ways: it is good if established methods are used and the design is managed within resource constraints, and within organizational and technological limitations, while also meeting stated objectives; it is even better if the design has a thought-through rationale; and ideally, the design should also be inspirational. These conceptions were transferred to points on a criteria-referenced grading scale which was used to develop course specific grading criteria. The criteria were evaluated in terms of comprehensibility and reliability. The evaluation showed that most of the students who also attended lectures understood the criteria. A high and significant covariation and a high level of agreement between the two teachers who graded the projects were shown. Further, the developed criteria should be generalizable to other process-centered interaction design courses and to assessment in other design disciplines.

  • 2.
    Blomkvist, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Åberg, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Holmlid, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Human-Centered systems. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Formative Evaluation of IT-based Services: A Case Study of a Meal Planning Service2014In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 540-556Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    To evaluate and develop a service supported by an IT (information technology) system the intentionto use the future service should be in focus. The technology acceptance model (TAM) and the theoryof planned behaviour (TPB) can both provide knowledge about users’ intention to use a service,making them good models to base formative decisions on. Unlike TAM, TPB is concerned withspecific information related to the service context, and provide knowledge about what makes ITuseable.We used an adapted version of the TPB as the foundation for a formative service evaluationtechnique called F-SET.We applied the F-SET to a case where two subsequent versions of a serviceprototype were evaluated. The first prototype was a description of the service supported by Hi-Fidesign sketches showing what a web-based meal planning tool could look like. The second prototypeconsisted of both service processes and the web-based meal planning tool.To find relevant factors thatinfluence future use of such a service, a survey of 28 informants was conducted with the first prototype.The second prototype involved five families who used the service for two weeks.The feedback providedby the families, based on the factors identified in the pre-test, influenced the future direction of theservice development. Feedback from the informants was distributed between the service and the ITsystem, and the most common factors that influence the intention to use the service were time, price,usefulness and availability. Feedback included both positive and negative comments, as well as bugsand suggestions for improvements.We discuss potential improvements and what kind of informationto expect from the different constructs of the TPB.

  • 3.
    Dinka, David
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, MDALAB - Human Computer Interfaces.
    Nyce, J.M.
    Department of Library and Information Management, Emporia State, Emporia, KS 66801, United States.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, FHVC - Folkhälsovetenskapligt centrum.
    The need for transparency and rationale in automated systems2006In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 18, no 5, p. 1070-1083Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    As medical devices and information systems become increasingly complex, the issue of how to support users becomes more important. However, many current help systems are often ignored or found to be too complicated to use by clinicians. In this article, we suggest an approach that allows designers to think about user support and automating tasks in ways users find more acceptable. The issue we address in particular is the notion of transparency and to what extent it allows the end-user to understand and critique the advice given. We have found that one central problem with existing support systems is that often the end-user does not understand the differences between the automated parts and the parts that have to be done manually. By taking aspects of transparency and control into account when designing an automated tool it seems that some of the more refractory issues that help systems pose for professional users can be addressed. © 2006 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 4.
    Pargman, T.C.
    et al.
    Department of Computer Sciences, DSV, University of Stockholm, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Waern, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    Appropriating the use of a Moo for collaborative learning2003In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 759-781Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study presents an analysis of the activities of professional teachers while they use a text-based computer-mediated communication system called a Moo. The teachers, who are geographically distributed, attend a professional training course in education and information technology. The focus is on the appropriation process with regard to using the artifact within their learning and teaching activity. In order to analyze this process, participants' text-based communication was logged and the data was treated both quantitatively and qualitatively. We found that interaction through the artifact brings a modification in the organization of the classroom discourse and in particular in the teachers' communication schemes. We observed that the teachers-as-students attending the online training used the artifact mainly for the establishment and maintenance of relationships. They appropriated the features of the artifact that allowed them to 'talk' and exchange personal experiences rather easily. They did not however, elaborate online information shared with the others. © 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • 5.
    Rabardel, P.
    et al.
    Department of Psychology, Universite Paris 8, 2 rue de la Liberte, Saint-Denis Cedex 02 93526, France.
    Waern, Yvonne
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    From artefact to instrument2003In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 641-645Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article discusses the user's appropriation of their computers as artefacts. The general trend in developing models concerning human behavior is moving from normative models of rational behavior, through efforts to model the observed less rational behavior. These developments constitute a change from normative models towards descriptive models and further towards 'formative' models that are characterized as approaches, where 'the workers finish the design'.

  • 6.
    Waern, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Communications and Transport Systems.
    Rabardel, P.
    Université Paris 8, CNRS, ESA 7021, Paris, France.
    Interacting with Computers: Editorial2003In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 731-735p. 731-735Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 7.
    Zhai, Shumin
    et al.
    IBM Almaden Research Cente, San Jose, USA.
    Kristensson, Per-Ola
    IBM Almaden Research Cente, San Jose, USA.
    Smith, Barton A.
    IBM Almaden Research Cente, San Jose, USA.
    In search of effective text input interfaces for off the desktop computing2005In: Interacting with computers, ISSN 0953-5438, E-ISSN 1873-7951, Vol. 17, no 3, p. 229-250Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It is generally recognized that today's frontier of HCI research lies beyond the traditional desktop computers whose GUI interfaces were built on the foundation of display—pointing device—full keyboard. Many interface challenges arise without such a physical UI foundation. Text writing—ranging from entering URLs and search queries, filling forms, typing commands, to taking notes and writing emails and chat messages—is one of the hard problems awaiting for solutions in off-desktop computing. This paper summarizes and synthesizes a research program on this topic at the IBM Almaden Research Center. It analyzes various dimensions that constitute a good text input interface; briefly reviews related literature; discusses the evaluation methodology issues of text input; presents the major ideas and results of two systems, ATOMIK and SHARK; and points out current and future directions in the area from our current vantage point.

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