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  • 1.
    Ahualli, S.
    et al.
    Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Delgado, A.V.
    Department of Applied Physics, University of Granada, 18071 Granada, Spain.
    Miklavcic, Stan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    White, L.R.
    Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, United States.
    Use of a cell model for the evaluation of the dynamic mobility of spherical silica suspensions2007In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 309, no 2, p. 342-349Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper we evaluate the validity of a cell model for the calculation of the dynamic mobility of concentrated suspensions of spheres. The key point is the consideration of the boundary conditions (electrical and hydrodynamic) at the boundary of the fluid cell surrounding a single probe particle. The model proposed is based on a universal criterion for the averages of fluid velocity, electric potential, pressure field or electrochemical properties in the cell. The calculations are checked against a wide set of experimental data on the dynamic mobility of silica suspensions with two different radii, several ionic strengths, and two particle concentrations. The comparison reveals an excellent agreement between theory and experiment, and the model appears to be extremely suitable for correctly predicting the behavior of the dynamic mobility, including the changes in the zeta potential, ?, with ionic strength, the frequency and amplitude of the Maxwell-Wagner-O'Konski relaxation, and the inertial relaxation occurring at the top of the frequency range accessible to our experimental device. © 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Attard, Phil
    et al.
    Ian Wark Research Institute, University of South Australia, Mawson Lakes, South Australia, 5095, Australia.
    Miklavcic, Stan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Effective spring description of a bubble or a droplet interacting with a particle2002In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 247, no 1, p. 255-257p. 255-257Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    It is shown that the interaction of a particle with a liquid drop or a gas bubble may be quantitatively described over the whole distance regime by treating the fluid interface as a Hookean spring. An algorithm suitable for analyzing atomic force microscopy data suitable for a calculator or a spread-sheet is given and applied to data for oil drops. (C) 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  • 3.
    Becker, Richard
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    CTAB promoted synthesis of Au nanorods - Temperature effects and stability consideration2010In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 343, no 1, p. 25-30Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A systematic study is performed of the influence of surfactant and temperature on the aspect ratio and monodispersity of Au nanorods, synthesized by a seed-mediated growth technique in water using cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) as surfactant. The changes in aspect ratio with temperature show an "anomalous" behaviour, where the aspect ratio first decreases with increasing temperature, reaching a minimum at about 55oC, and after that increases again reaching a maximum at about 80oC. A physical explanation of the observed behaviour is proposed. It has also been studied how the CTAB concentration in the cleansing water used in the post-synthesis treatment of the samples affected the stability of the gold suspension. It was found that without the presence of a surfactant such as CTAB in the washing medium, only very few centrifugations can be carried out without considerable loss of product. Characterization of prepared samples was performed with UV-Vis and TEM.

  • 4.
    Benesch, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Askendal, Agneta
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics .
    The determination of thickness and surface mass density of mesothick immunoprecipitate layers by null ellipsometry and protein 125Iodine labeling2002In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 249, no 1, p. 84-90Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the present study was to ellipsometrically determine the thickness and surface mass density in air for up to 110-nm-thick organic layers made of alternatingly deposited layers of HSA and polyclonal anti-HSA on hydrophobic silicon. The ellipsometrically determined thickness was compared to that obtained by AFM and the deposited surface mass density calibrated with 125I-labeled proteins. The results indicate a good agreement in protein layer thickness between AFM and ellipsometry when the protein film refractive index Nfilm = 1.5 -0i, although then the calculated surface mass density from the ellipsometry data became grossly overestimated by the Cuypers one-component formula. A good agreement in the surface mass density was obtained when the M/A ratio in this formula was lowered from 4.14 to 2.35. This approach indicates a convenient means of determining the refractive indices and surface mass densities of mesothick organic layers proteins on solid supports. © 2002 Elsevier Science (USA).

  • 5.
    Björk, Emma M.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Single-pot synthesis of ordered mesoporous silica films with unique controllable morphology2014In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 413, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mesoporous silica films consisting of a monolayer of separated SBA-15 particles with unusually wide and short pores grown on silicon wafers have been fabricated in a simple single-pot-synthesis, and the formation of the films has been studied. A recipe for synthesizing mesoporous silica rods with the addition of heptane and NH4F at low temperature was used and substrates were added to the synthesis solution during the reaction. The films are ∼90 nm thick, have a pore size of 10.7–13.9 nm depending on the hydrothermal treatment time and temperature, and a pore length of 200–400 nm. All pores are parallel to the substrate, open, and easy to access, making them suitable for applications such as catalyst hosts and gas separation. The growth of the films is closely correlated to the evolution of the mesoporous silica particles. Here, we have studied the time for adding substrates to the synthesis solution, the evolution of the films with time during formation, and the effect of hydrothermal treatment. It was found that the substrates should be added within 30–60 s after turning off the stirring and the films are formed within 10 min after addition to the synthesis solution. The study has yielded a new route for synthesizing mesoporous silica films with a unique morphology.

  • 6.
    Björk, Emma
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Ulm, Germany.
    Mäkie, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rogström, Lina
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Atakan, Aylin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schell, Norbert
    Helmholtz Zentrum Geesthacht, Germany.
    Odén, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Nanostructured Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Formation of block-copolymer-templated mesoporous silica2018In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 521, p. 183-189Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In situ attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy is used to monitor the chemical evolution of the mesoporous silica SBA-15 from hydrolysis of the silica precursor to final silica condensation after the particle formation. Two silica precursors, tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) or sodium metasilicate (SMS) were used, and the effects of additive (heptane and NH4F) concentrations were studied. Five formation stages are identified when TEOS is used as the precursor. The fourth stage correlates with the appearance and evolution of diffraction peaks recorded using in situ small angle X-ray diffraction. Details of the formed silica matrix are observed, e.g. the ratio between six-fold cyclic silica rings and linear bonding increases with the NH4F concentration. The TEOS hydrolysis time is independent of the NH4F concentration for small amounts of heptane, but is affected by the size of the emulsion droplets when the heptane amount increases. Polymerization and condensation rates of both silica precursors are affected by the salt concentration. Materials synthesized using SMS form significantly faster compared to TEOS-materials due to the pre-hydrolysis of the precursor. The study provides detailed insights into how the composition of the synthesis solution affects the chemical evolution and micellar aggregation during formation of mesoporous silica. (C) 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

    The full text will be freely available from 2020-03-13 13:33
  • 7.
    Ederth, T.
    et al.
    Department of Chemistry, Surface Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Box 5607, Stockholm, SE-114 86, Sweden.
    Tamada, K.
    National Institute of Materials and Chemical Research (NIMC), Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-8565, Japan.
    Claesson, P.M.
    Department of Chemistry, Surface Chemistry, Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, SE-100 44, Sweden, Institute for Surface Chemistry, Box 5607, Stockholm, SE-114 86, Sweden.
    Valiokas, Ramunas
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Colorado, Jr. R.
    Colorado Jr., R., Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5641, United States.
    Graupe, M.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5641, United States.
    Shmakova, O.E.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5641, United States.
    Lee, T.R.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Houston, Houston, TX 77204-5641, United States.
    Force measurements between semifluorinated thiolate self-assembled monolayers: Long-range hydrophobic interactions and surface charge2001In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 235, no 2, p. 391-397Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-range interactions between self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of semifluorinated alkanethiols have been studied by direct force measurements in water and aqueous NaCl solutions. SAMs prepared from three different thiols, with identical fluorinated head groups but varying hydrocarbon spacer lengths, were investigated: CF3(CF2)9(CH2)xSH, where x = 2, 11, or 17. Force measurements show that the interactions in water and electrolyte solutions are composed of both double-layer interactions emerging from what appears to be charges adsorbed onto the surfaces and long-range "hydrophobic" attractions, in excess of the expected van der Waals forces. The three investigated thiols produce similar results in force measurements, though the contact angles with water are slightly different. The "hydrophobic" attraction has the form of step-like attractive discontinuities in the force profiles at separations ranging from 20 to 40 nm, caused by bridging of microscopic bubbles residing at the surfaces. The shape or range of these discontinuities are not significantly affected by replacement of the water with either 1 mM or 1 M NaCl solutions. The origin of the charges causing the electrostatic double-layer interaction is unclear, but some possible causes are discussed. © 2001 Academic Press.

  • 8.
    Eita, Mohamed
    et al.
    Royal Institute Technology KTH.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Granberg, Hjalmar
    Innventia AB.
    Wagberg, Lars
    Royal Institute Technology KTH.
    Addition of silica nanoparticles to tailor the mechanical properties of nanofibrillated cellulose thin films2011In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 363, no 2, p. 566-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Over the last decade, the use of nanocellulose in advanced technological applications has been promoted both due the excellent properties of this material in combination with its renewability. In this study, multilayered thin films composed of nanofibrillated cellulose (NFC), polyvinyl amine (PVAm) and silica nanoparticles were fabricated on polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using a layer-by-layer adsorption technique. The multilayer build-up was followed in situ by quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, which indicated that the PVAm-SiO(2)-PVAm-NFC system adsorbs twice as much wet mass material compared to the PVAm-NFC system for the same number of bilayers. This is accompanied with a higher viscoelasticity for the PVAm-SiO(2)-PVAm-NFC system. Ellipsometry indicated a dry-state thickness of 2.2 and 3.4 nm per bilayer for the PVAm-NFC system and the PVAm-SiO(2)-PVAm-NFC system, respectively. Atomic force microscopy height images indicate that in both systems, a porous network structure is achieved. Youngs modulus of these thin films was determined by the Strain-Induced Elastic Buckling Instability for Mechanical Measurements (SIEBIMM) technique. The Youngs modulus of the PVAm/NFC films was doubled, from 1 to 2 GPa, upon incorporation of silica nanoparticles in the films. The introduction of the silica nanoparticles lowered the refractive index of the films, most probably due to an increased porosity of the films.

  • 9.
    Ekeroth, Johan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Borgh, Annika
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and Monolayer Characterization of Phosphorylated Amino Acid Analogs2002In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 254, no 2, p. 322-330Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The synthesis of a series of thiols containing phosphorylated and non-phosphorylated serine, threonine, and tyrosine amino acid residues is described. The synthesized molecules, based on 3-mercaptopropionic acid, were assembled onto gold and subsequently characterized using infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy, ellipsometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact angle goniometry. The ellipsometric analysis indicates that they form densely packed and well-oriented monolayers on gold, with thicknesses that are in good agreement with estimated values from space-filling models. The bulky and space-demanding phosphorylated threonine analog was, however, found to be an exception. The increase in layer thickness when adding a phosphate group to the threonine is only 35% of that observed for the two other analogs. A detailed infrared examination of the influence of cation coordination to the phosphorylated serine analog using calcium and magnesium reveals structural similarities to those of the inorganic phosphate compound calcium hydroxy apatite. We furthermore discuss the application of these monolayers as soft templates for biomineralization.

  • 10.
    Faxälv, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hume, Jasmin
    Chalmers.
    Kasemo, Bengt
    Chalmers.
    Svedhem, Sofia
    Chalmers.
    Imaging of blood plasma coagulation at supported lipid membranes2011In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 364, no 2, p. 582-587Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The blood coagulation system relies on lipid membrane constituents to act as regulators of the coagulation process upon vascular trauma, and in particular the 2D configuration of the lipid membranes is known to efficiently catalyze enzymatic activity of blood coagulation factors. This work demonstrates a new application of a recently developed methodology to study blood coagulation at lipid membrane interfaces with the use of imaging technology. Lipid membranes with varied net charges were formed on silica supports by systematically using different combinations of lipids where neutral phosphocholine (PC) lipids were mixed with phospholipids having either positively charged ethylphosphocholine (EPC), or negatively charged phosphatidylserine (PS) headgroups. Coagulation imaging demonstrated that negatively charged SiO(2) and membrane surfaces exposing PS (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of PS) had coagulation times which were significantly shorter than those for plain PC membranes and EPC exposing membrane surfaces (obtained from liposomes containing 30% of EPC). Coagulation times decreased non-linearly with increasing negative surface charge for lipid membranes. A threshold value for shorter coagulation times was observed below a PS content of similar to 6%. We conclude that the lipid membranes on solid support studied with the imaging setup as presented in this study offers a flexible and non-expensive solution for coagulation studies at biological membranes. It will be interesting to extend the present study towards examining coagulation on more complex lipid-based model systems. (C) 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Gudlur, Sushanth
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandén, Camilla
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Matouskova, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fasciani, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Liposomes as nanoreactors for the photochemical synthesis of gold nanoparticles2015In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 456, p. 206-209Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A simple and novel method for the photochemical synthesis of AuNPs in liposomes is described. Gold salt is co-encapsulated with the photoinitiator Irgacure-2959 in POPC liposomes prepared via traditional thin-film hydration technique. UVA irradiation for 15 min results in encapsulated AuNPs of 2.8 +/- 1.6 nm in diameter that are primarily dispersed in the aqueous interior of the liposomes. (C) 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 12.
    Karlsson, L M
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Tengvall, Pentti
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Lundström, Ingemar
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Physics.
    Arwin, Hans
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Applied Optics .
    Penetration and loading of human serum albumin in porous silicon layers with different pore sizes and thicknesses2003In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 266, no 1, p. 40-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Human serum albumin was adsorbed into porous silicon layers with thickness up to 3 µm and with different mean pore radius in the range 4.5-10 nm. The adsorbed amount of protein was quantified by I125 radioactive labeling techniques and ellipsometry. The results show that albumin penetrated into the pores when the mean pore radius was larger than 5.5 nm, but could not totally occupy the available surface area when the layer thickness was larger than 1 µm. Loading of albumin both into porous layers and onto plane silicon as a function of albumin concentration was also investigated. These measurements show that loading of protein increased with protein concentration at least up to 10 mg/ml for porous silicon and up to 1 mg/ml for plane silicon. The maximum deposition into the type of porous layers used here was 28 µg/cm2, compared to 0.36 µg/cm2 for plane silicon. © 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aulin, Christian
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    IR and quantum-chemical studies of carboxylic acid and glycine adsorption on rutile TiO2 nanoparticles2006In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 296, no 1, p. 71-78Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

      Nanocrystalline TiO2 powders of the rutile polymorph, synthesized by a sol–gel method, were treated with water solutions containing, respectively, formic, acetic, and citric acid and glycine in order to study the adsorption properties of these organic species. The samples were characterized by FTIR, Raman, powder XRD, and TEM. It was found that HCOOH, CH3COOH and HOC(COOH)(CH2COOH)2—but not NH2CH2COOH—adsorbed onto TiO2. The adsorption of HCOOH, CH3COOH and NH2CH2COOH onto the (110) surface of rutile was also studied by quantum-chemical periodic density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The organic molecules were from the computations found to adsorb strongly to the surfaces in a bridge-coordinating mode, where the two oxygens of the deprotonated carboxylic acid bind to two surface titanium ions. Surface relaxation is found to influence adsorption geometries and energies significantly. The results from DFT calculations and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations of formic acid adsorption onto TiO2 are compared and match well with the experimental IR measurements, supporting the bridge-binding geometry of carboxylic-acid adsorption on the TiO2 nanoparticles.

  • 14.
    Petoral, Rodrigo Jr
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Wermelin, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine .
    Dahlstedt, E.
    Hellberg, J.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Adsorption of n-butyl-substituted tetrathiafulvalene dodecanethiol on gold2005In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 287, no 2, p. 388-393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) derivative substituted with two butyl- and two dodecylthiol chains is adsorbed on polycrystalline gold. The TTF-derived thiol adsorbates were characterized by ellipsometry, contact angle goniometry, infrared and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The molecule is strongly anchored on the gold surface through the sulfur terminating the alkylthiol chains. On the average, the TTF moiety is oriented extended away from the gold surface. The topmost layer of the film containing the dibutyl chains is disordered with gauche defects. The molecule was organized with majority of the alkylthiol chains bound to the gold surface. There are indications of pinholes in the monolayer due to steric hindrance of the bulky TTF rings. The molecular systems consisting of an electroactive π-system such as TTF, are promising for thin-film field effect transistor application. © 2005 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Rudko, Galyna Yu
    et al.
    V. Lashkaryov Institute of Semiconductor Physics of National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, 45, Pr. Nauky, Kiev 03028, Ukraine..
    Koval'chuk, Andrii O
    Nauky, Kiev 03028, Ukraine.
    Fediv, Volodymyr I
    Department of Biophysics and Medical Informatics, Bukovinian State Medical University, 42 Kobylyanska st., 58000 Chernivtsi, Ukraine..
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Buyanova, Irina A
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Functional Electronic Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Interfacial bonding in a CdS/PVA nanocomposite: A Raman scattering study2015In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 452, p. 33-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Raman spectroscopy is employed to characterize the bonding between CdS nanoparticles (NPs) and a polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) as well as structural changes in the polymeric matrix caused by incorporation of NPs. It is shown that after the formation of CdS NPs the vibrations of carbonyl groups in acetate residuals of PVA and of CO groups at the macromolecules ends disappear. Formation of NPs also leads to an increased degree of hydrogen bonding and crystallinity of the hybrid material as compared with the unloaded polymer. The observed changes are ascribed to the formation of coordinative bonds and hydrogen between the CdS nanoparticles and polymeric macromolecules. The scheme of this interfacial bonding is also proposed.

  • 16.
    Suriyanarayanan, Subrarnanian
    et al.
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Lee, Hung-Hsun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Aastrup, Teodor
    Attana AB, Sweden .
    Nicholls, Ian A
    Linnaeus University, Sweden .
    Protein-resistant hyperbranched polyethyleneimine brush surfaces2013In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 396, p. 307-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel hyperbranched polyethyleneimine (PEI) modified gold surface has been designed, fabricated, and investigated with respect to its ability to resist non-specific adsorption of proteins. The facile synthesis strategy, based on self-assembly, involves immobilization of polyethyleneimine to gold surfaces modified with 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MuDA) monolayers using traditional carbodiimide chemistry. The hyperbranched polymer brushes were characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Reflection absorption infrared spectroscopy (RAIRS) and ellipsometry measurements showed the thickness of the PEI brushes increases with adsorption solution ionic strength. Polymer brush surface concentrations can be improved from 2560 to 3880 chains/mu m(2) by changing the ionic strength of the adsorption solution (PBS) by varying NaCl concentration from 0 to 650 mM. Protein adsorption (pH 7.4) was evaluated under flow injection analysis (FIA) conditions using a quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). The PEI brushes suppress protein adsorption, for example, cytochrome C, bovine serum albumin (BSA), and ribonuclease A, to less than 0.08 mu g/cm(2) and the protein resistance increases with increasing ionic strength of the carrier solution, performance comparable to that achieved with comparable PEG-coated surfaces. The PEI brushes were exceptionally stable, with adsorption characteristics maintained after 6 months storage in aqueous conditions (pH 7.4, 25 degrees C, PBS). The potential of hyperbranched PEI structures as protein-resistant surfaces is discussed.

  • 17.
    Söderlind, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Inorganic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Petoral, Rodrigo M.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Synthesis and characterisation of Gd2O3 nanocrystals functionalised by organic acids2005In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 288, no 1, p. 140-148Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nanocrystals of Gd2O3 have been prepared by various methods, using, e.g., trioctylphosphine oxide (TOPO), diethylene glycol (DEG) or glycine. The crystalline particles were of sizes 5 to 15 nm. Different carboxylic acids, e.g., oleic acid or citric acid, were adsorbed onto the surface of the particles made with DEG. IR measurements show that the molecules coordinate to the Gd2O3 surface via the carboxylate group in a bidentate or bridging manner. The organic-acid/particle complexes were characterised by XRPD, TEM, FTIR, Raman, and XPS.

  • 18.
    Uvdal, Kajsa
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Ekeroth, Johan
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Tyrosine derivatives assembled on gold2003In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 260, no 2, p. 361-366Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two different tyrosine derivatives, one with the OH group free and one with the OH group phosphorylated, linked to 3-mercaptopropionic acid through an amide bond are adsorbed to gold surfaces. The adsorbates are studied by means of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and infrared reflection-absorption spectroscopy (IRAS). The techniques are used to investigate the coordination to the surface and the molecular orientation of adsorbates relative to the surface. Molecular surface interactions, causing chemical shifts in the core level XPS spectra of the adsorbates on gold, are investigated using multilayer films as references. Angle-dependent XPS, XPS(T), and IRAS are used to estimate molecular orientation relative to the surface. The tyrosine derivatives adsorb chemically to the surface through the sulfur atoms and highly organized monolayers are formed with the OH and the PO32- exposed to the air/vacuum interface. © 2003 Elsevier Science (USA). All rights reserved.

  • 19.
    Zhou, Ye
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Liedberg, Bo
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Sensor Science and Molecular Physics .
    Gorochovceva, Natalija
    Polymer chemistry Vilnius University.
    Makuska, Ricardas
    Polymer Chemistry Vilnius University.
    Dedinaite, Andra
    Surface Chemistry KTH.
    Claesson, Per M.
    Surface Chemistry KTH.
    Chitosan-N-poly(ethylene oxide) brush polymers for reduced nonspecific protein adsorption2007In: Journal of Colloid and Interface Science, ISSN 0021-9797, E-ISSN 1095-7103, Vol. 305, no 1, p. 62-71Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The possibility of using a novel comb polymer consisting of a chitosan backbone with grafted 44 units long poly(ethylene oxide) side chains for reducing nonspecific protein adsorption to gold surfaces functionalized by COOH-terminated thiols has been explored. The comb polymer was attached to the surface in three different ways: by solution adsorption, covalent coupling, and microcontact printing. The protein repellant properties were tested by monitoring the adsorption of bovine serum albumin and fibrinogen employing surface plasmon resonance and imaging null ellipsometry. It was found that a significant reduction in protein adsorption is achieved as the comb polymer layer is sufficiently dense. For solution adsorption this was achieved by adsorption from high pH solutions. On the other hand, the best performance of the microcontact printed surfaces was obtained when the stamp was inked either at low or at high pH. For a given comb polymer layer thickness/poly(ethylene oxide) density, significant differences in protein repellant properties were observed between the different preparation methods, and it is suggested that a reduction in the mobility of the comb polymer layer generated by covalent attachment favors a reduced protein adsorption. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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