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  • 1.
    Forsum, Urban
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Hallander, Hans O.
    Swedish Institute for Infectious Disease Control Stockholm.
    Kallner, Anders
    Dept of Clinical Chemistry Karolinska Univesity Hospital.
    Karlsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics.
    The impact of qualitative analysis in laboratory medicine2005In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 24, no 6, p. 546-555Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laboratory medicine is a challenge for the metrologically and terminologically inclined scientist. One main reason is the need for a sound theory that can be applied in a systematic way to cover all aspects of examinations, i.e., those procedures whose results are reported on an ordinal scale and those reported on more primitive scales (e.g., classifications and narratives). Validation of procedures for examinations involving properties on a nominal scale is especially difficult to achieve because it is hard to find gold standards, in the conventional sense, against which to validate and which combine performance characteristics and clinically relevant specificity and sensitivity. We present a systematic, unambiguously defined terminology (the C-NPU coding scheme) for metrologically derived terms for expressing properties, and present some examples of how to attain diagnostic goals. If the analytic process in the laboratory can be subsumed into medical contexts in a systematic way, many pitfalls in reporting results can be avoided. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 2.
    Mak, Wing Cheung
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Beni, Valerio
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Turner, Anthony
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lateral-flow technology: from visual to instrumental.2016In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 79, no SI, p. 297-305Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Lateral-flow tests were first launched commercially in 1984, as a simple urine-based pregnancy test for home use. The simplicity of the visual readout delivered by the basic lateral-flow format proved to be a very popular. However, the recent apparently unstoppable trend towards portable and wearable technology is driving the lateral-flow strip towards an industrial interface that will enable it to interface with big data and expert systems, and where ready transmission of data is essential. In this review, we chart the inevitable evolution of the visually-read lateral-flow strip to more advanced instrumented versions and consider the future of this very flexible approach to delivering simple affinity assays. We examine recent labelling strategies, the relative merits of optical and electrochemical transducers and explore the evolution of recognition elements that are now being incorporated into these systems.

  • 3.
    SAINI, S
    et al.
    ; .
    TURNER, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    MULTIPHASE BIOELECTROCHEMICAL SENSORS1995In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 14, no 7, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in operating bioelectrochemical sensors in unconventional environments such as non-polar water-immiscible organic solvents has led to new concepts in biosensor design. This brief review considers the evolution of an approach to electrochemical measurement using thin ionically conducting films at the surface of closely spaced micro-electrodes. The ability to support ail the elements normally associated with the bioelectrochemistry of catalytic proteins at a semi-rigid ionic matrix leads to a robust sensor configuration capable of operating in non-polar solvents such as hexane or directly in gases. Such multi-phase sensors are expected to be of particular utility in environmental monitoring where measurements need to be made in water and air samples.

  • 4.
    Tothill, IE
    et al.
    ; .
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Developments in bioassay methods for toxicity testing in water treatment1996In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 15, no 5, p. 178-188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The presence of toxic substances in water and water treatment plants is a major environmental problem. Numerous test methods have been developed to assess the effect of chemical pollutants on the environment, including bioassays. Bioassays in which test organisms are exposed to various doses of the pollutant are used for toxicity evaluations. This is achieved by monitoring the biological integrity of these organisms and comparing them with those which have not been exposed to the pollutant. The need for simple, rapid and relatively inexpensive aquatic toxicity tests has influenced the expansion in research in this area and accelerated the development and application of biological toxicity tests.

  • 5.
    Turner, APF
    Cranfield University, UK.
    Biosensors for environmental monitoring: A report on the 5th European Workshop on Biosensors for Environmental Monitoring and Stability of Biosensors, held in Freising, Germany, 28-30 May 19971997In: TrAC. Trends in analytical chemistry, ISSN 0165-9936, E-ISSN 1879-3142, Vol. 16, no 7, p. R8-R9Article in journal (Other academic)
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