liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Bai, Sai
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Oxford, England.
    Sakai, Nobuya
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Zhang, Wei
    Univ Oxford, England; Univ Lincoln, England.
    Wang, Zhiping
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Wang, Jacob T.-W.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Gao, Feng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Univ Oxford, England.
    Snaith, Henry J.
    Univ Oxford, England.
    Reproducible Planar Heterojunction Solar Cells Based on One-Step Solution-Processed Methylammonium Lead Halide Perovskites2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 1, p. 462-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Metal halide perovskites have been demonstrated as one of the most promising materials for low-cost and high-performance photovoltaic applications. However, due to the susceptible crystallization process of perovskite films on planar substrates and the high sensitivity of the physical and optoelectronic nature of the internal interfaces within the devices, researchers in different laboratories still experience poor reproducibility in fabricating efficient perovskite solar cells with planar heterojunction device structures. In this method paper, we present detailed information on the reagents, equipment, and procedures for the fabrication of planar perovskite solar cells in both "regular" n-i-p and "inverted" p-i-n architectures based on one-step solution-processed methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI(3)) perovskite films. We discuss key parameters affecting the crystallization of perovskite and the device interfaces. This method paper will provide a guideline for the reproducible fabrication of planar heterojunction solar cells based on MAPbI3 perovskite films. We believe that the shared experience on MA-based perovskite films and planar solar cells will be also useful for the optimization process of perovskites with varied compositions, and other emerging perovskite-based optoelectronic devices.

  • 2.
    Camacho, Rafael
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Meyer, Matthias
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Vandewal, Koen
    Technical University of Dresden, Germany.
    Tang, Zheng
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Scheblykin, Ivan G.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Polarization Imaging of Emissive Charge Transfer States in Polymer/Fullerene Blends2014In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 26, no 23, p. 6695-6704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photoexcitation of conjugated polymerfullerene blends results in population of a local charge transfer (CT) state at the interface between the two materials. The competition between recombination and dissociation of this interfacial state limits the generation of fully separated free charges. Therefore, a detailed understanding of the CT states is critical for building a comprehensive picture of the organic solar cells operation. We applied a new fluorescence microscopy method called two-dimensional polarization imaging to gain insight into the orientation of the transition dipole moments of the CT states, and the associated excitation energy transfer processes in TQ1:PCBM blend films. The polymer phase was oriented mechanically to relate the polymer dipole moment orientation to that of the CT states. CT state formation was observed to be much faster than energy transfer in the polymer phase. However, after being formed an emissive CT state does not exchange excitation energy with other CT states, suggesting that they are spatially and/or energetically isolated. We found that the quantum yield of the CT emission is smaller for CT states spatially located in the highly oriented polymer domains, which is interpreted as the result of enhanced CT state dissociation in highly ordered structures.

  • 3.
    Charrier, Dimitri S. H.
    et al.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Janssen, Rene A. J.
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Kemerink, Martijn
    Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands.
    Large Electrically Induced Height and Volume Changes in Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/Poly(styrenesulfonate) Thin Films2010In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 22, no 12, p. 3670-3677Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We demonstrate large, partly reversible height and volume changes of thin films of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) on the anode of interdigitating gold electrodes under ambient conditions by applying an electrical bias. The height and volume changes were monitored with optical and atomic force microscopy and are found to be independent of initial film thickness. In the first cycle, a relative height change of 950% is observed for a 21 nm thick film. Two regimes are identified. In the first regime, reversible redox reactions occur and reversible height changes can be ascribed to absorption of water via osmotic effects, brought about by an increasing ion concentration on the anode. In the second, irreversible regime, irreversible overoxidation of the PEDOT occurs and mass transport from the channel to the anode becomes important.

  • 4.
    Chubarov, Mikhail
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Czigany, Zsolt
    Hungarian Academic Science, Hungary .
    Garbrecht, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Henry, Anne
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Polytype pure sp2-BN thin films as dictated by the substrate crystal structure2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 5, p. 1640-1645Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Boron nitride (BN) is a promising semiconductor material, but its current exploration is hampered by difficulties in growth of single crystalline phase-pure thin films. We compare the growth of sp2-BN by chemical vapor deposition on (0001) 6H-SiC and on (0001) α-Al2O3 substrates with an AlN buffer layer. Polytype-pure rhombohedral BN (r-BN) with a thickness of 200 nm is observed on SiC whereas hexagonal BN (h-BN) nucleates and grows on the AlN buffer layer. For the latter case after a thickness of 4 nm, the h-BN growth is followed by r-BN growth to a total thickness of 200 nm. We find that the polytype of the sp2-BN films is determined by the ordering of Si-C or Al-N atomic pairs in the underlying crystalline structure (SiC or AlN). In the latter case the change from h-BN to r-BN is triggered by stress relaxation. This is important for the development of BN semiconductor device technology.

  • 5.
    Crispin, Xavier
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Jakobsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Crispin, Annica
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry.
    Grim, P.C.M.
    KUL, Belgien.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    Volodin, A.
    KUL, Belgien.
    van Haesendonch, C.
    KUL, Belgien.
    van der Auweraer, M.
    KUL, Belgien.
    Salaneck, William R
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology.
    The origin of the high conductivity of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)- poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) plastic electrodes2006In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 18, no 18, p. 4354-4360Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The development of printed and flexible (opto)electronics requires specific materials for the device's electrodes. Those materials must satisfy a combination of properties. They must be electrically conducting, transparent, printable, and flexible. The conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) - poly-(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT-PSS) is known as a promising candidate. Its conductivity can be increased by 3 orders of magnitude by the secondary dopant diethylene glycol (DEG). This "secondary doping" phenomenon is clarified in a combined photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning probe microscopy investigation. PEDOT-PSS appears to form a three-dimensional conducting network explaining the improvement of its electrical property upon addition of DEG. Polymer light emitting diodes are successfully fabricated using the transparent plastic PEDOT-PSS electrodes instead of the traditionally used indium tin oxide. © 2006 American Chemical Society.

  • 6.
    Doherty, Walter J
    et al.
    University of Arizona.
    Armstrong, N.R.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
    Saavedra, S.S.
    Department of Chemistry, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721.
    Conducting polymer growth in porous sol-gel thin films: Formation of nanoelectrode arrays and mediated electron transfer to sequestered macromolecules2005In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 17, no 14, p. 3652-3660Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The templated electrochemical growth of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) into porous sol-gel (PSG) films and PEDOT-mediated electron transfer to ferrocene-modified dendrimers encapsulated within these sol-gel matrices, were analyzed. The conditions needed to optimize PEDOT electropolymerization within the PSG films such that barely emergent PEDOT features protrude from a PSG thin film surface, were also described. It was observed that oxidation/reduction of the encapsulated Fc-PAMAM units could be voltammetrically detected after PEDOT growth into the sol-gel film. The results show that up to ca. 20% of these Fc-PAMAM units became electrochemically active, with high rates of electron transfer, when EDTM was conjugated to the Fc-PAMAM dendrimer.

  • 7.
    Ghidiu, Michael
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Kota, Sankalp
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Bish, David
    Indiana University, IN 47405 USA.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    Drexel University, USA.
    Barsourm, Michel W.
    Drexel University, USA.
    Ion-Exchange and Cation Solvation Reactions in Ti3C2 MXene2016In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 28, no 10, p. 3507-3514Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti3C2 and other two-dimensional transition metal carbides known as MXenes are currently being explored for many applications involving intercalated ions, from electrochemical energy storage, to contaminant sorption from water, to selected ion sieving. We report here a systematic investigation of ion exchange in Ti3C2 MXene and its hydration/dehydration behavior. We have investigated the effects of the presence of LiCl during the chemical etching of the MAX phase Ti3AlC2 into MXene Ti3C2Tx (T stands for surface termination) and found that the resulting MXene has Li+ cations in the interlayer space. We successfully exchanged the Li+ cations with K+, Na+, Rb+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ (supported by X-ray photoelectron and energy-dispersive spectroscopy) and found that the exchanged material expands on the unit-cell level in response to changes in humidity, with the nature expansion dependent on the intercalated cation, similar to behavior of clay minerals; stepwise expansions of the basal spacing were observed, with changes consistent with the size of the H2O molecule. Thermogravimetric analysis of the dehydration behavior of these materials shows that the amounts of H2O contained at ambient humidity correlates simply with the hydration enthalpy of the intercalated cation, and that the diffusion of the exiting H2O proceeds with kinetics similar to clays. These results have implications for understanding, controlling, and exploiting structural changes and H2O sorption in MXene films and powders utilized in applications involving ions, such as electrochemical capacitors, sensors, reverse osmosis membranes, or contaminant sorbents.

  • 8.
    Ghidiu, Michael
    et al.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Kota, Sankalp
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Halim, Joseph
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Sherwood, Alexander W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Nedfors, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mochalin, Vadym N.
    Missouri University of Science and Technology, MO 65409 USA; Missouri University of Science and Technology, MO 65409 USA.
    Barsoum, Michel W.
    Drexel University, PA 19104 USA.
    Alkylammonium Cation Intercalation into Ti3C2 (MXene): Effects on Properties and Ion-Exchange Capacity Estimation2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 1099-1106Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ti3C2Tx MXene intercalated with Li+ ions was produced and ion-exchanged with a series of trimethylalkylammonium (AA) cations of increasing alkyl chain length. A discontinuous expansion in the MXene layer spacing was observed, attributed to complete packing of the interlayer space at a critical chain length. The latter was used to estimate the number of cations per Ti3C2 formula unit, which was found to be in good agreement with a similar quantification obtained from X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, energy-dispersive spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The system was also modeled using density functional theory and molecular dynamics, arriving at cation concentrations in the same range. The intercalated AA cations led to tunable increases in resistivity of the normally highly electrically conductive MXene and were investigated as interlayer pillars in electrochemical capacitors.

  • 9.
    Gormley, Adam J.
    et al.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Chandrawati, Rona
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Christofferson, Andrew J.
    RMIT University, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Loynachan, Colleen
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Jumeaux, Coline
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Artzy-Schnirman, Arbel
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Aili, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Yarovsky, Irene
    RMIT University, Australia; RMIT University, Australia.
    Stevens, Molly M.
    University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England; University of London Imperial Coll Science Technology and Med, England.
    Layer-by-Layer Self-Assembly of Polymer Films and Capsules through Coiled-Coil Peptides2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 16, p. 5820-5824Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The layer-by-layer (LbL) technique is a simple and robust process for fabricating functional multilayer thin films. Here, we report the use of de novo designed polypeptides that self-assemble into coiled-coil structures (four-helix bundles) as a driving force for specific multilayer assembly. These pH- (sensitive between pH 4 and 7) and enzyme-responsive polypeptides were conjugated to polymers, and the LbL assembly of the polymer-peptide conjugates allowed the deposition of up to four polymer-peptide layers on planar surfaces and colloidal substrates. Stable hollow capsules were obtained, and by taking advantage of the peptides susceptibility to specific enzymatic cleavage, release of encapsulated cargo within the carriers can be triggered within 2 h in the presence of matrix metalloproteinase-7. The enormous diversity of materials that can form highly controllable and programmable coiled-coil interactions creates new opportunities and allows further exploration of the multilayer assembly and the formation of carrier capsules with unique functional properties.

  • 10.
    Halim, Joseph
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Univ Penn, PA 19104 USA Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Lukatskaya, Maria R.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA Drexel University, PA 19104 USA .
    Cook, Kevin M.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA Drexel University, PA 19104 USA .
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Smith, Cole R.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA .
    Näslund, Lars-Åke
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    May, Steven J.
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA .
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Gogotsi, Yury
    University of Penn, PA 19104 USA Drexel University, PA 19104 USA .
    Eklund, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Barsoum, Michel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Transparent Conductive Two-Dimensional Titanium Carbide Epitaxial Thin Films2014In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 26, no 7, p. 2374-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Since the discovery of graphene, the quest for two-dimensional (2D) materials has intensified greatly. Recently, a new family of 2D transition metal carbides and carbonitrides (MXenes) was discovered that is both conducting and hydrophilic, an uncommon combination. To date MXenes have been produced as powders, flakes, and colloidal solutions. Herein, we report on the fabrication of similar to 1 x 1 cm(2) Ti3C2 films by selective etching of Al, from sputter-deposited epitaxial Ti3AlC2 films, in aqueous HF or NH4HF2. Films that were about 19 nm thick, etched with NH4HF2, transmit similar to 90% of the light in the visible-to-infrared range and exhibit metallic conductivity down to similar to 100 K. Below 100 K, the films resistivity increases with decreasing temperature and they exhibit negative magnetoresistance-both observations consistent with a weak localization phenomenon characteristic of many 2D defective solids. This advance opens the door for the use of MXenes in electronic, photonic, and sensing applications.

  • 11.
    Karlsson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åsberg, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Interactions between a zwitterionic polythiophene derivative and oligonucleotides as resolved by fluorescence resonance energy transfer2005In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 17, no 16, p. 4204-4211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The interactions between a zwitterionic polythiophene derivative, POWT, and DNA oligonucleotides in solution have been studied by FRET (fluorescence resonance energy transfer). When POWT and ssDNA are bound alone in a complex, the distance between them is at its smallest. The distance increases when adding complementary DNA, but POWT is still mainly bound to the first DNA strand. We find that two POWT chains bind to one DNA strand, and the two POWT chains seem held together in pairs, unable to separate, as they can only bind to and quench half their own amount of labeled DNA. This POWT−POWT complex appears to dissociate at lower concentrations. ssDNA attached to POWT in a complex can also be substituted by other ssDNA in solution; this occurs to 50% when the free DNA is present in 10-fold concentration compared to the ssDNA bound to POWT. Titration studies at different concentrations show positive cooperativity in the binding of POWT and ssDNA into a complex. The hybridization of complementary DNA to the same complex involves no cooperativity. These observations indicate interesting possibilities for the use of POWT as a DNA sensor.

  • 12.
    Karlsson, Roger H.
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Herland, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åslund, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry . Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iron Catalyzed Polymerization of Alkoxysulfonate-Functionalized EDOT gives2007In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 13.
    Karlsson, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Herland, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Hamedi, Mahiar
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Wigenius, Jens
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Åslund, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Liu, Xianjie
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Fahlman, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Konradsson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Organic Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Iron-Catalyzed Polymerization of Alkoxysulfonate-Functionalized 3,4-Ethylenedioxythiophene Gives Water-Soluble Poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) of High Conductivity2009In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 21, no 9, p. 1815-1821Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemical polymerization of a 3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene derivative bearing a sulfonate group (EDOTS) is reported. The polymer, PEDOT-S, is fully water-soluble and has been produced by polymerizing EDOT-S in water, using Na2S2O8 and a catalytic amount of FeCl3. Elemental analysis and XPS measurements indicate that PEDOT-S is a material with a substantial degree of self-doping, but also contains free sulfate ions as charge-balancing counterions of the oxidized polymer. Apart from self-doping PEDOT-S, the side chains enable full water solubility of the material; DLS studies show an average cluster size of only 2 nm. Importantly, the solvation properties of the PEDOT-S are reflected in spin-coated films, which show a surface roughness of 1.2 nm and good conductivity (12 S/cm) in ambient conditions. The electro-optical properties of this material are shown with cyclic voltammetry and spectroelectrochemical experiment reveals an electrochromic contrast (similar to 48% at lambda(max) = 606 nm).

  • 14.
    Lindell, Linda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Burquel, A.
    Service de Chimie des Matériaux Nouveaux, Université de Mons-Hainaut, Place du Parc 20, 5-7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Jakobsson, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lemaur, V.
    Service de Chimie des Matériaux Nouveaux, Université de Mons-Hainaut, Place du Parc 20, 5-7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Berggren, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Lazzaroni, R.
    Service de Chimie des Matériaux Nouveaux, Université de Mons-Hainaut, Place du Parc 20, 5-7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Cornil, J.
    Service de Chimie des Matériaux Nouveaux, Université de Mons-Hainaut, Place du Parc 20, 5-7000 Mons, Belgium.
    Salaneck, William R
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Surface Physics and Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Crispin, Xavier
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Transparent, plastic, low-work-function poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) electrodes2006In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 18, no 18, p. 4246-4252Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Novel applications for flexible electronics, e.g., displays and solar cells, require fully flexible, transparent, stable, and low-work-function electrodes that can be manufactured via a low-cost process. Here, we demonstrate that surface chemistry constitutes a route to producing transparent low-work-function plastic electrodes. The work function of the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene)-tosylate, or PEDOT-Tos, is decreased by submonolayer surface redox reaction with a strong electron donor, tetrakis-(dimethylamino)ethylene (TDAE), allowing it to reach a work function of 3.8 eV. The interface formed between TDAE and PEDOT is investigated in a joint experimental and theoretical study using photoelectron spectroscopy and quantum chemical calculations. © 2006 American Chemical Society.

  • 15.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    On the Existence of Nonfunctional Materials2018In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 30, no 17, p. 5797-5798Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Time as the Fourth Dimension: Opening up New Possibilities in Chemical Vapor Deposition2016In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 691-699Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thin films of inorganic materials are essential to several technologies we take for granted in our everyday lives. They form the basis of touch screens in smart phones and the electronic components in computers. Dating back more than a century, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is one of the most common methods to form these films. In CVD, the atoms needed for the thin film are typically supplied by a continuous flow of gaseous precursor molecules and incorporated into the film by gas phase and surface chemical reactions. The continuous demand for more precise thin film fabrication on more complex shapes at lower temperatures sets a demand for more advanced CVD methods. The development of better designed precursor molecules is one important path to evolve CVD; the other path is to evolve the way in which we do CVD. In this perspective I will describe how using time as a fourth dimension in CVD can enable fabrication of new thin film materials and material structures at lower temperatures and on more complex substrate geometries by accessing new types of CVD chemistries available in time-resolved CVD.

  • 17.
    Souqui, Laurent
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Högberg, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Surface-Inhibiting Effect in Chemical Vapor Deposition of Boron-Carbon Thin Films from Trimethylboron2019In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 31, no 15, p. 5408-5412Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We use the ability to control surface chemistry in chemical vapor deposition (CVD) to deposit boron-carbon films into pores with an aspect ratio of 60:1 without clogging the opening, and into lateral trenches with ratios of up to 2000:1. In contrast to many other surface-controlled CVD processes, operating at low temperatures (100-250 degrees C) and pressures (10-1000 Pa), we use trimethylboron at a higher temperature (700 degrees C) and pressure (5000 Pa), affording a surface-inhibited. CVD process in hydrogen ambient. We show that the deposition rate is highly dependent on the partial pressure of hydrogen; decreasing proportionally to the logarithm of the partial pressure. The surface-controlled effect is not encountered in argon ambient. We propose that this is explained by a competitive adsorption of growth species and inhibiting dihydrogen or atomic hydrogen species following a Temkin isotherm.

  • 18.
    Tao, Quanzheng
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Lu, Jun
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Dahlqvist, Martin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Mockuté, Aurelija
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Oak Ridge Natl Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Calder, Stuart
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, TN 37831 USA.
    Petruhins, Andrejs
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Meshkian, Rahele
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Rivin, Oleg
    Nucl Res Ctr Negev, Israel; Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat and Energie, Germany.
    Potashnikov, Daniel
    Technion Israeli Inst Technol, Israel; Israel Atom Energy Commiss, Israel.
    Caspi, Elad N.
    Nucl Res Ctr Negev, Israel.
    Shaked, Hagai
    Ben Gurion Univ Negev, Israel.
    Hoser, Andreas
    Helmholtz Zentrum Berlin Mat and Energie, Germany.
    Opagiste, Christine
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Galera, Rose-Marie
    Univ Grenoble Alpes, France.
    Salikhov, Ruslan
    Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany; Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Wiedwald, Ulf
    Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany; Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Ritter, Clemens
    Inst Laue Langevin, France.
    Wildes, Andrew R.
    Inst Laue Langevin, France.
    Johansson, Boerje
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Humboldt Univ, Germany.
    Hultman, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fade, Michael
    Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany; Univ Duisburg Essen, Germany.
    Barsoum, Michel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Drexel Univ, PA 19104 USA.
    Rosén, Johanna
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Thin Film Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Atomically Layered and Ordered Rare-Earth i-MAX Phases: A New Class of Magnetic Quaternary Compounds2019In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 31, no 7, p. 2476-2485Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In 2017, we discovered quaternary i-MAX phases atomically layered solids, where M is an early transition metal, A is an A group element, and X is C-with a ((M2/3M1/32)-M-1)(2)AC chemistry, where the M-1 and M-2 atoms are in-plane ordered. Herein, we report the discovery of a class of magnetic i-MAX phases in which bilayers of a quasi-2D magnetic frustrated triangular lattice overlay a Mo honeycomb arrangement and an Al Kagome lattice. The chemistry of this family is (Mo2/3RE1/3)(2)AlC, and the rare-earth, RE, elements are Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, and Lu. The magnetic properties were characterized and found to display a plethora of ground states, resulting from an interplay of competing magnetic interactions in the presence of magnetocrystalline anisotropy.

  • 19.
    Wang, Suhao
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Laboratory of Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Fazzi, Daniele
    Univ Cologne, Germany.
    Puttisong, Yuttapoom
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Jafari, Mohammad Javad
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Chen, Zhihua
    Flexterra Corp, IL 60077 USA.
    Ederth, Thomas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Molecular Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Andreasen, Jens W.
    Tech Univ Denmark, Denmark.
    Chen, Weimin
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Facchetti, Antonio
    Flexterra Corp, IL 60077 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA; Northwestern Univ, IL 60208 USA.
    Fabiano, Simone
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Effect of Backbone Regiochemistry on Conductivity, Charge Density, and Polaron Structure of n-Doped Donor-Acceptor Polymers2019In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 31, no 9, p. 3395-3406Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the influence of backbone regiochemistry on the conductivity, charge density, and polaron structure in the widely studied n-doped donor-acceptor polymer poly[N,N-bis(2-octyldodecyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalenediimide-2,6-diyl]-alt-5,5-(2,2-bithiophene) [P-(NDI2OD-T2)]. In contrast to classic semicrystalline polymers such as poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT), the regioirregular (RI) structure of the naphthalenediimide (NDI)-bithiophene (T2) backbone does not alter the intramolecular steric demand of the chain versus the regioregular (RR) polymer, yielding RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) with similar energetics and optical features as its RR counterpart. By combining the electrical, UV-vis/infrared, X-ray diffraction, and electron paramagnetic resonance data and density functional theory calculations, we quantitatively characterized the conductivity, aggregation, crystallinity, and charge density, and simulated the polaron structures, molecular vibrations, and spin density distribution of RR-/RI-P(NDI2OD-T2). Importantly, we observed that RI-P(NDI2OD-T2) can be doped to a greater extent compared to its RR counterpart. This finding is remarkable and contrasts benchmark P3HT, allowing us to uniquely study the role of regiochemistry on the charge-transport properties of n-doped donor-acceptor polymers.

  • 20. Wang, ZC
    et al.
    Hu, XF
    Käll, Per-Olov
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Physical Chemistry .
    Helmersson, Ulf
    Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Plasma and Coating Physics .
    High Li+-ion storage capacity and double-electrochromic behavior of sol-gel-derived iron oxide thin films with sulfate residues2001In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 13, no 6, p. 1976-1983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    FeSO4. 7H(2)O was precipitated with ammonia solution in the presence of H2O2 as an oxidant. The precipitate was washed slightly with deionized water and then peptized with acetic acid (ca. 60 mol %) to attain a homogeneous sol. Iron oxide films were fabricated by spin-coating the sol onto ITO-coated glass substrates and annealing at 350 degreesC or above. Structural and compositional analyses were done by TG-DTA, FTIR, XRD, TEM, and XPS. The results showed that sulfate residues were adsorbed on the surface of the Fe2O8 nanoparticles constituting the films by monodentate coordination with Fe(III) surface sites when heat treatment was carried out at less than or equal to 450 degreesC, while a conversion to bidentate occurred at 500 degreesC, As shown by the cyclic voltammograms results, the films annealed at 350 degreesC exhibited Li+-ion storage capacity as high as ca. 0.50 mC(.)cm(-2) per nanometer of the film thickness and showed double-electrochromic behavior depending on the extent of intercalation during the electrochemical lithium insertion/extraction processes. It is proposed that the adsorbed sulfate residues lead to the enhanced electroactivity of the iron oxide films by retarding crystallization and dehydration of the films. The high charge capacity and nearly optical passiveness of the iron oxide films suggest their promising applications as counter-electrodes in electrochromic devices.

  • 21.
    Wing Cheung, Mak
    et al.
    National University of Singapore.
    Cheung, Kwan Yee
    National University of Singapore.
    Trau, Dieter
    National University of Singapore.
    Influence of Different Polyelectrolytes on Layer-by-Layer Microcapsule Properties: Encapsulation Efficiency and Colloidal and Temperature Stability2008In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 20, no 17, p. 5475-5484Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The fabrication of colloidal and temperature stable microcapsules for encapsulation of biomolecules based on matrix-assisted layer-by-layer (LbL) encapsulation by polyelectrolyte self-assembly has been demonstrated. In brief, the process is based on the emulsification of a hydrogel in warm oil for microdroplet formation. The hydrogel acts as a matrix for the later encapsulation process and can be loaded with biomolecules. After microdroplets of, for example, protein loaded hydrogel are formed by emulsification, cooling leads to solidification of the droplets to form microbeads, followed by encapsulation of the hydrogel microbeads with polyelectrolyte multilayers through an LbL self-assembly process to form polymeric capsules. Colloidal stability, encapsulation efficiency, and temperature stability of the LbL hydrogel microcapsules composed from different polyelectrolytes with various ionic strengths and charge densities have been studied. Microcapsules fabricated with strong polyelectrolytes showed better colloidal stability, while microcapsules fabricated with weak polyelectrolytes showed better encapsulation efficiency and temperature stability. After temperature treatment, microcapsules fabricated with different polyelectrolytes exhibited different morphological changes from complete rupturing over broken microcapsules with deformed hollow shells to intact microcapsules. Among all the studied polyelectrolyte pairs, the PAH/PSS polyelectrolyte system was found to be the best material to fabricate microcapsules with good colloidal and temperature stability and high encapsulation efficiency. Microcapsules with PSS as the outermost layer remained similar in size after temperature treatment, while microcapsules with PAH as the outermost layer shrunk by 76% in capsule volume. The present study provides a detailed overview on properties and design of LbL microcapsules as a function of polyelectrolyte materials and layer number. As a result of the versatility of loading LbL hydrogel microcapsules with various biomolecules or mixtures, potential applications are in the fields of diagnostics, drug delivery, and life sciences.

  • 22.
    Yazdanfar, Milan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kalered, Emil
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Danielsson, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Kordina, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nilsson, Daniel
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ivanov, Ivan Gueorguiev
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Ojamäe, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Janzén, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Pedersen, Henrik
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Brominated chemistry for chemical vapor deposition of electronic grade SiC2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 3, p. 793-801Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chlorinated chemical vapor deposition (CVD) chemistry for growth of homoepitaxial layers of silicon carbide (SiC) has paved the way for very thick epitaxial layers in short deposition time as well as novel crystal growth processes for SiC. Here, we explore the possibility to also use a brominated chemistry for SiC CVD by using HBr as additive to the standard SiC CVD precursors. We find that brominated chemistry leads to the same high material quality and control of material properties during deposition as chlorinated chemistry and that the growth rate is on average 10 % higher for a brominated chemistry compared to chlorinated chemistry. Brominated and chlorinated SiC CVD also show very similar gas phase chemistries in thermochemical modelling. This study thus argues that brominated chemistry is a strong alternative for SiC CVD since the deposition rate can be increased with preserved material quality. The thermochemical modelling also suggest that the currently used chemical mechanism for halogenated SiC CVD might need to be revised.

  • 23.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Schmidt, Martina M.
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Thelakkat, Mukundan
    University of Bayreuth, Germany.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Science and Technology, Physics and Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Soling, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Highly Stable Accumulation Mode Electrochemical Transistors2017In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 29, no 10, p. 4293-4300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Counterion exchange has been introduced as a method to modify properties of anionic conjugated poly electrolyte (CPE) blends. Blending of two self-doped CPEs having metallic and semiconducting behavior has been achieved from two different solvents, by exchanging the counterion of the metallic component. Different blending conditions lead to films exhibiting different optical properties, depending on the aggregation states of the CPEs. Conductance responses for the blends showed the opportunity to tune threshold voltage of the films both by blending and counterion exchange. Therefore, the blends have been exploited for the fabrication of accumulation mode organic electrochemical transistors. These devices exhibit short switching times and high transconductance, up to 15.3 rnS, as well as high stability upon fast pulsed cycles, retaining 88% of the drain currents after 2 x 10(3) cycles.

  • 24.
    Zeglio, Erica
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Vagin, Mikhail
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Musumeci, Chiara
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Ajjan, Fátima
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Gabrielsson, Roger
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Chemistry. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Trinh, Xuan thang
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Nguyen, Son Tien
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Semiconductor Materials. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Maziz, Ali
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biosensors and Bioelectronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Solin, Niclas
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Inganäs, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Biomolecular and Organic Electronics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering.
    Conjugated Polyelectrolyte Blends for Electrochromic and Electrochemical Transistor Devices2015In: Chemistry of Materials, ISSN 0897-4756, E-ISSN 1520-5002, Vol. 27, no 18, p. 6385-6393Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Two self-doped conjugated polyelectrolytes, having semiconducting and metallic behaviors, respectively, have been blended from aqueous solutions in order to produce materials with enhanced optical and electrical properties. The intimate blend of two anionic conjugated polyelectrolytes combine the electrical and optical properties of these, and can be tuned by blend stoichiometry. In situ conductance measurements have been done during doping of the blends, while UV vis and EPR spectroelectrochemistry allowed the study of the nature of the involved redox species. We have constructed an accumulation/depletion mode organic electrochemical transistor whose characteristics can be tuned by balancing the stoichiometry of the active material.

1 - 24 of 24
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf