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  • 1.
    Koobak, Redi
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Marling, Raili
    University of Tartu, Estonia.
    The decolonial challenge: Framing post-socialist Central and Eastern Europe within transnational feminist studies2014In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 21, no 4, p. 330-343Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The article explores the location of Central and Eastern Europe in transnational feminist studies. Despite the acknowledgement of the situatedness of knowledge, feminist theorising nevertheless seems to continue to be organised around a limited number of central axes and internalised progress narratives. The authors argue that there is a pressing need for theories which can approach the near absence of Central and Eastern European perspectives from transnational feminist theorising, and challenge the limited number of discursive tropes associated with post-socialist Central and Eastern Europe – especially that of a ‘lag’, where difference is translated into a temporal distance. Instead, the authors suggest that a more inclusive vision of transnational feminist studies can be achieved by applying the decolonial framework to the post-socialist context, as explicated in the work of Madina Tlostanova.

  • 2.
    Kruse, Corinna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Forensic Evidence: Materializing Bodies, Materializing Crimes2010In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 363-377Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on an ethnographic study of fingerprint and DNA evidence practices in the Swedish judicial system, this article analyses the materialization of forensic evidence. It argues that forensic evidence, while popularly understood as firmly rooted in materiality, is inseparably technoscientific and cultural. Its roots in the material world are entangled threads of matter, technoscience and culture that produce particular bodily constellations within and together with a particular sociocultural context. Forensic evidence, it argues further, is co-materialized with crimes as well as with particular bodily and social constellations. Consequently, the article suggests that an analysis of how forensic evidence is produced can contribute to feminist understandings of the inseparability of sex and gender: understanding bodies as ongoing technoscientific-material-cultural practices of materialization may be a fruitful approach to analysing their complexity, and the relationships in which they are placed, without surrendering to either cultural or biological determinism. Taking a theoretical point of departure not only in an STS-informed approach, but also in material feminist theorizations, the article also underlines that the suggested theoretical conversations across borders of feminist theory and STS should be understood as a two-way-communication where the two fields contribute mutually to each other.

  • 3.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Editorial2001In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 8, no 3, p. 275-279Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies.
    Transformative Methodologies in Feminist Studies.2005In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 12, p. 243-247Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Mulinari, Diana
    et al.
    Centre Gender Studies, Sweden .
    Neergaard, Anders
    Linköping University, REMESO - Institute for Research on Migration, Ethnicity and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    We are Sweden Democrats because we care for others: Exploring racisms in the Swedish extreme right2014In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 21, no 1, p. 43-56Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    During the last decades there has been an upsurge in research on xenophobic populist parties, mirroring their political successes. In the Swedish context, characterised by neoliberal restructuring, issues of race, citizenship and belonging have been important elements of the public debate. These issues have unfolded in parallel with the presence of a neo-Nazi social movement and the emergence of two new parliamentary parties in which cultural racism has been central. Research has especially focused on the xenophobic content and how to relate these parties to the wider research on party politics in western liberal democracies. While there have been some studies focusing on gendered differences in voting and activism highlighting the peripheral role of women, there are still very few studies analysing the worldview of women active in these parties, and the role of gender as metaphor, identity and policy within these parties. Inspired by feminist, postcolonial and Marxist research, the authors of this article are interested in analysing the worldview of women activists. The material is composed of 20 in-depth interviews with female Sweden Democrat politicians complemented by party texts and participant observation. The aim of the article is to explore how women within a Swedish version of these parties, the Sweden Democrats, name and reflect upon their experiences, especially focusing on how a care rhetoric is used in their narratives. These women have chosen to represent a racist party (although they do not see themselves or the party as racist). What inspires them? What visions of gender evolve from their worldview?

  • 6.
    Peterson, Helen
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Engwall, Kristina
    Institute for Futures Studies, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Silent Bodies: Childfree Women's Gendered and Embodied Experiences2013In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 376-389Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article reports from the first studies on voluntary childlessness in Sweden and addresses a so far neglected issue - the embodied experiences of childfree women. These childfree women reject and resist pronatalist understandings that conflate being a woman with being a mother. However, instead of explaining their childlessness by external factors, mentioned in previous research, the interviewed women created a positive feminine identity separated from motherhood with reference to their silent bodies', i.e. bodies without a biological urge to reproduce. Reducing voluntary childlessness to a mere result of biological determinism, the article argues, establishes a legitimate, natural position, less provocative and stigmatized in a pronatalist society. Nevertheless, paradoxically, drawing on biological determinism both challenges and reinstates pronatalism as it builds on the simultaneous acceptance of, and detachment from, the biological reproductive urge. The study hence highlights how persistent the social and cultural link between motherhood and womanhood is, but also how this relationship can be challenged.

  • 7.
    Salminen Karlsson, Minna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Technology and Social Change.
    Turning women from criminals into victims: Discussions on abortion in the Catholic Church of Sweden2005In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 12, no 2, p. 187-200Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article examines how one of the most striking differences between the central doctrines of the Catholic Church and the secular context of Swedish society, attitudes to abortion, is managed by the Swedish church hierarchy and commentators in the official newsletter of the Catholic Church of Sweden. Using Foucauldian concepts of power, the article concludes that in its marginal position, the Catholic Church in Sweden mixes the traditional pastoral and sovereign power of the church with the way pastoral power is exerted in modern society, in its efforts to continue asserting its influence over the possible courses of action for pregnant women. While traditionally abortion has been a woman's crime, in the Swedish Catholic context it becomes rather the crime of the secular society. This means also that the image of woman as being responsible for her decisions and in need of forgiveness gives way to an image of woman as a victim in need of understanding. Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications.

  • 8.
    Sohl, Lena
    Södertörn University, Sweden.
    Feel-bad moments: Unpacking the complexity of class, gender and whiteness when studying ‘up’2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, p. 1-14Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Intimacy, shared experiences and evening out the power relations between researcher and the participants play an important role in feminist methodology. However, as highlighted in previous research on studying ‘up’, such methods might not be appropriate when studying privileged groups. Therefore, studying privileged women challenges fundamental assumptions in feminist methodology. When researching privileged women, the assumption that the researcher is almost always in a superior position within the research process becomes more complicated. The article seeks to contribute to the feminist methodological literature on how to study privileged groups by exploring how class, gender and whiteness are produced in three fieldwork situations with women who hold privileges in a postcolonial and capitalist landscape. Drawing on interviews and participant observations with white Swedish migrant women, the article argues that researchers need to turn the problems, fears and feelings of being uncomfortable into important data, in order to study privileged groups of women.

  • 9.
    Swahnberg, Katarina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gender and medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The Palgrave Handbook of Gender and Health Care2012In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 19, no 1, p. 137-138Article, book review (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 10.
    Werner, Ann
    et al.
    Södertörn Univ, Sweden.
    Lundberg, Anna
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Gender jobs: Dilemmas of Gender Studies education and employability in Sweden2018In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 25, no 1, p. 71-85Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In the past decades a large number of students have taken courses and degrees in Gender Studies around Europe and proceeded to find employment. This article is based on a quantitative and qualitative study carried out in 2012 of Gender Studies students in Sweden, their education and employment. The design of the study was inspired by a large European research project investigating Womens Studies in Europe and concerned with the motives for doing Gender Studies among Swedish students, as well as who the students were, how they evaluated their Gender Studies education and what work they proceeded to after they left the university. In this article the results are discussed in terms of dilemmas: between Gender Studies critique of neoliberalism, employability and the former students wishes to be employed, and their evaluation of their studies and employment. The Swedish study is also compared with previous research in order to understand general and particular traits in Swedish Gender Studies education and employment. Analysis points to interesting contradictions within Gender Studies in relation to the labor market, student groups and employability.

  • 11.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Birke, Lynda
    University Chester, UK.
    Biology is a feminist issue: Interview with Lynda Birke2010In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 413-423Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    This is an interview with Professor Lynda Birke (University of Chester, UK), one of the key figures of feminist science studies. She is a pioneer of feminist biology and of materialist feminist thought, as well as of the new and emerging field of hum-animal studies (HAS). This interview was conducted over email in two time periods, in the spring of 2008 and 2010. The format allowed for comments on previous writings and an engagement in an open-ended dialogue. Professor Birke talks about her key arguments and outlooks on a changing field of research. The work of this English biologist is typical of a long and continuous feminist engagement with biology and ontological matters that reaches well beyond the more recently articulated material turn of feminist theory. It touches upon feminist issues beyond the usual comfort zones of gender constructionism and human-centred research. Perhaps less recognized than for instance the names of Donna Haraway or Karen Barad, Lynda Birkes oeuvre is part of the same long-standing and twofold critique from feminist scholars qua trained natural scientists. On the one hand, theirs is a powerful critique of biological determinism; on the other, an acutely observed contemporary critique of how merely cultural or socially reductionist approaches to the effervescently lively and biological might leave the corporeal, environmental or non-human animal critically undertheorized within feminist scholarship. In highlighting the work and arguments of Lynda Birke, it is hoped here to provide an accessible introduction to the critical questions and challenges that circumvent contemporary discussions within feminist technoscience as theory and political practice.

  • 12.
    Åsberg, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lykke, Nina
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, The Department of Gender Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Feminist Technoscience Studies2010In: The European Journal of Women's Studies, ISSN 1350-5068, E-ISSN 1461-7420, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 299-305Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 12 of 12
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