liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Hirsch, Richard
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Making meaning together: A distributed story of speaking and thinking2010In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 32, no 5, p. 528-535Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The relation of language to thought and mind is an ancient topic in linguistic theory. Normally language is related to thought in an individual mind. In this article, I explore the analogy between the dimensions and dynamics of individual perception as formulated by Husserl and the inter-individual perception and conceptualization found in everyday conversations.

    The notions of horizon, perspective, appresentation, and apperception developed by Husserl for the phenomenology of individual perception are generalized to incorporate the mutual and cooperative calibration of consciousness evidenced in conversational discussions where speakers cooperate to construct an interpretation and evaluation of their experience. This process of local cooperative and mutual co-construction and evaluation of interpretations of experience takes place in what is referred to here as a course of development. An extended excerpt from a conversational discussion is used to demonstrate the interactive dialogic and dialectical work speakers carry out in an effort to make sense of their experience of the world and their relationship to the world and each other. Ways of talking are analysed as means of constructing restricted folk-theoretic world-views that rely on the dialogic-dialectical work of the speakers. Contributions to an on-going discussion are claimed to constitute folk theories actualized in real time in the talk where Husserl’s notions of horizon, perspective, etc. of individual consciousness are given a distributed or shared interpretation in the establishment and maintenance of inter-individual consciousness in relation to the topics and events under development in the conversation.

  • 2.
    Linell, Per
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication.
    Dialogicality in languages, minds and brains: is there a convergence between dialogism and neuro-biology?2007In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 29, no 5, p. 605-620Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this contribution is to take a number of key notions in dialogical theory, and look for their possible counterparts in recent neuroscience. This comprises points like other-orientation, relationism and context-interdependence, embodiment of language, responsive understanding, potentialities, unfinalisability, implicitness and degrees of awareness, and redundancy of processing. The conclusion is that there is indeed an incipient convergence between neuro-biology and cognitive dynamics, on the one hand, and dialogism on the other. A general dialogical framework has something to offer to cognitive science and evolutionary psychology, not in the least because dialogue and dialogical interaction appear to be more fundamental than language (at least as language has been conceived most often). Brains are complex organisms coordinating the apperception of and interventions into the world, rather than producing and processing agency-free representations of the world. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Čekaitė, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Microgenesis of language creativity: Innovation, conformity and incongruence in children's language play2018In: Language sciences (Oxford), ISSN 0388-0001, E-ISSN 1873-5746, Vol. 65, p. 26-36Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study examines young children's engagement in language creativity, in this instance, spontaneous language play. It presents an analysis of peer group interaction in a multilingual preschool setting for 3- to 6-year-olds in Sweden. Combining video-ethnography and detailed interactional analysis, it explores the interactional organization, textual features, evaluative/affective stances and social functions that characterize language play. The theoretical perspective draws on interactional sociolinguistics and the Vygotskian (2004) notion that imagination and creativity are built on patterning (i.e., recognizability), innovative transformations and manipulations of prior materials, experiences and understandings. Here, creativity is shown to be a collective and normatively guided process: it is located in peer group collaborative performances, and involves peer group language, affective and aesthetic socialization. The analysis shows that children's spontaneous language play is characterized by an aesthetic in which that which is incongruent, unexpected and also recognizable is exploited and appreciated. It feeds on the ongoing tension between predictability (routine of culturally recognizable activities) and the novelty/improvisational character of in situperformance. Creative language use serves as a multifaceted locus for aesthetic, affective and normative (ideological) stance taking and mutual socialization. Through their performances, the children socialize each other into sensitivity to what kind of contributions constitute valued verbal genres of the peer group culture.

1 - 3 of 3
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf