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  • 1.
    Ball, Martin J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The rhaeadr effect in clinical phonology2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 453-462Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A distinction is drawn between Crystals bucket theory of language processing and an overflow of effects between different linguistic levels in language production. Most of the examples are drawn from Welsh (a language of mutual interest to the author and the honoree of this issue). For that reason, it is proposed that this effect is termed the rhaeadr effect (from the Welsh for waterfall). The rhaeadr effect is illustrated with the initial consonant mutation systems of Welsh and Irish, and with data from both normal phonological (and morphophonological) development and disordered speech.

  • 2.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 451-452Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 3.
    Ball, Martin J
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: Special Issue: Selected Papers from ICPLA 2014 in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 4, pp 247-2482015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 4, p. 247-248Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 4.
    Kuecker, Karrie
    et al.
    University of Louisiana Lafayette, LA 70504 USA.
    Lockenvitz, Sarah
    Missouri State University, MO USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Amount of rhoticity in schwar and in vowel plus /r/ in American English2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 623-629Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We present a preliminary study of the duration of rhoticity in coda-r words in American English. We note that traditional descriptions of American English phonology divide these words into two categories: words that end in a vowel followed by a separate /r/ segment (plus possible final consonant), and words that end in an r-colored vowel (plus possible final consonant). R-colored central vowels are termed here stressed and unstressed schwar. Recordings of 15 speakers of American English producing tokens containing these types of vowels were acoustically analysed, and the durations of the rhotic parts of the tokens were measured. The results demonstrated that stressed schwars were usually completely rhotic, unstressed schwars were usually not completely rhotic, but still had on average longer rhotic portions than the vowels+/r/. These findings have implications for intervention with /r/ disorders, which are encountered commonly in child speech disorders. It is argued that if these findings are borne out in a broader study, there might be no need to teach two different types of coda-r in therapy.

  • 5.
    Lina Krummheuer, Antonia
    et al.
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Klippi, Anu
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Liisa Raudaskoski, Pirkko
    Aalborg University, Denmark.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Participating with limited communication means: Conversation analytical perspectives on the interactional management of participation structures INTRODUCTION2016In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 721-729Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 6.
    Lockenvitz, Sarah
    et al.
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Missouri State University, Springfield, MO, USA.
    Kuecker, Karrie
    Department of Communicative Disorders, University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Lafayette, LA, USA.
    Ball, Martin J
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Evidence for the distinction between ‘consonantal-/r/’ and ‘vocalic-/r/’ in American English2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 613-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We examine the distinction between “consonantal-r” and “vocalic-r” in American English, terms encountered in the speech pathology literature but rarely in phonetic studies. We review evidence from phonetics, phonology and therapy, and describe our own study which measured percentage rhoticity in pre- and post-vocalic /r/. We suggest that the evidence supports a view that there is no more variation between pre-vocalic and post-vocalic /r/ than found in many other consonants. We also evaluate the different transcription traditions for post-vocalic /r/ in American English (as a consonant or a vowel), and describe a preliminary study demonstrating that these transcriptions are not equivalent, and denote different realisations.

  • 7.
    Lohmander, Anette
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hagberg, Emilie
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Persson, Christina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden; Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Willadsen, Elisabeth
    University of Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Davies, Julie
    Royal Manchester Childrens Hospital, England.
    Havstam, Christina
    Sahlgrens University Hospital, Sweden.
    Boers, Maria
    University Hospital Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Kisling-Moller, Mia
    Cleft Palate Centre, Denmark.
    Alaluusua, Suvi
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Aukner, Ragnhild
    Statped Sorost, Norway.
    Helen Pedersen, Nina
    Statped Vest, Norway.
    Turunen, Leena
    University of Helsinki, Finland.
    Nyberg, Jill
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Validity of auditory perceptual assessment of velopharyngeal function and dysfunction - the VPC-Sum and the VPC-Rate2017In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 31, no 7-9, p. 589-597Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Overall weighted or composite variables for perceptual auditory estimation of velopharyngeal closure or competence have been used in several studies for evaluation of velopharyngeal function during speech. The aim of the present study was to investigate the validity of a composite score (VPC-Sum) and of auditory perceptual ratings of velopharyngeal competence (VPC-Rate). Available VPC-Sum scores and judgments of associated variables (hypernasality, audible nasal air leakage, weak pressure consonants, and non-oral articulation) from 391 5-year olds with repaired cleft palate (the Scandcleft project) were used to investigate content validity, and 339 of these were compared with an overall judgment of velopharyngeal competence (VPC-Rate) on the same patients by the same listeners. Significant positive correlations were found between the VPC-Sum and each of the associated variables (Cronbachs alpha 0.55-0.87, P amp;lt; 0.001), and a moderately significant positive correlation between VPC-Sum and VPC-Rate (Rho 0.698, P amp;lt; 0.01). The latter classified cases well when VPC-Sum was dichotomized with 67% predicted velopharyngeal competence and 90% velopharyngeal incompetence. The validity of the VPC-Sum was good and the VPC-Rate a good predictor, suggesting possible use of both measures depending on the objective.

  • 8.
    Lohmander, Anette
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Persson, Christina
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    SVANTE - The Swedish Articulation and Nasality Test - Normative data and a minimum standard set for cross-linguistic comparison2017In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 31, no 2, p. 137-154Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Normative language-based data are important for comparing speech performances of clinical groups. The Swedish Articulation and Nasality Test (SVANTE) was developed to enable a detailed speech assessment. This studys aim was to present normative data on articulation and nasality in Swedish speakers. Single word production, sentence repetition and connected speech were collected using SVANTE in 443 individuals. Mean (SD) and prevalences in the groups of 3-, 5-, 7-, 10-, 16- and 19-year-olds were calculated from phonetic transcriptions or ordinal rating. For the 3- and 5-year-olds, a consonant inventory was also determined. The mean percent of oral consonants correct ranged from 77% at age 3 to 99% at age 19. At age 5, a mean of 96% was already reached, and the consonant inventory was established except for /s/, /r/, /?/. The norms on the SVANTE, also including a short version, will be useful in the interpretation of speech outcomes.

  • 9.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Word-initial /r/-clusters in Swedish speaking children with typical versus protracted phonological development2018In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 32, no 5-6, p. 446-458Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study investigated word-initial (WI) /r/-clusters in Central Swedish-speaking children with and without protracted phonological development (PPD). Data for WI singleton /r/ and singleton and cluster /l/ served as comparisons. Participants were twelve 4-year-olds with PPD and twelve age- and gender-matched typically developing (TD) controls. Native speakers audio-recorded and transcribed 109 target single words using a Swedish phonology test with 12 WI C+/r/-clusters and three WI CC+/r/-clusters. The results showed significantly higher match scores for the TD children, a lower match proportion for the /r/ targets and for singletons compared with clusters, and differences in mismatch patterns between the groups. There were no matches for /r/-cluster targets in the PPD group, with all children except two in that group showing deletions for both /r/-cluster types. The differences in mismatch proportions and types between the PPD group and controls suggests new directions for future clinical practice.

  • 10.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Svensson, Rose-Marie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Myrberg, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    A shift of treatment approach in speech language pathology services for children with speech sound disorders - a single case study of an intense intervention based on non-linear phonology and motor-learning principles2019In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 518-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Even though there are documented benefits of direct intensive intervention for children with speech sound disorders (SSDs), the intensity given at Swedish Speech Language Pathology services rarely exceeds once a week. Also, indirect therapy approaches are commonly employed. The purpose of the present case study was to investigate the effects of an intensive specialist therapy, based on non-linear phonological analysis and motor learning principles. The participant was a boy aged 4:10 years with severe SSD, who previously had received indirect therapy from age 3 with, very limited results. A single subject ABA design was used. At baseline, whole word match was 0%, Word shape CV match was 39% and PCC was 22, 7%. He had no multisyllabic words, no consonant clusters and no established coronals. Intervention was given 4 days weekly for 3 weeks in two periods with a 7-week intervening break and a post therapy assessments. Therapy was focused on establishing multisyllabic words, iambic stress pattern, clusters and coronals with the principle of using already established elements for targeting new elements. At post therapy assessment, whole word match was 39%, word shape CV match was 71% and PCC 69.1%. Multisyllabic words (86%), coronals (82%) and word initial clusters (80%) were established. Without being targeted, back vowels were also present and segment timing improved. The strong treatment effects of this study demonstrate that at least severe cases of SSD require the clinical knowledge and skills that only a SLP can provide and that frequent direct therapy is both beneficial and needed.

  • 11.
    Lundeborg, Inger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    McAllister, Anita
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericsson, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Hultcrantz, Elisabeth
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Oto-Rhiono-Laryngology and Head & Neck Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of ENT - Head and Neck Surgery UHL.
    Phonological development in children with obstructive sleep-disordered breathing2009In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 23, no 10, p. 751-61Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adeno-tonsillar hypertrophy with obstructive sleep disordered breathing (OSDB) is known to affect oral-motor function, behaviour, and academic performance. Adeno-tonsillectomy is the most frequently performed operation in children, with total tonsillectomy (TE) being more common than partial resection, 'tonsillotomy' (TT). In the present study 67 children, aged 50-65 months, with OSBD were randomized to TE or TT. The children's phonology was assessed pre-operatively and 6 months post-operatively. Two groups of children served as controls. Phonology was affected in 62.7% of OSBD children before surgery, compared to 34% in the control group (p < .001). Also, OSBD children had more severe phonological deficits than the controls (p < .001). Phonology improved 6 months equally after both surgeries. Despite improvement post-operatively, the gap to the controls increased. Other functional aspects, such as oral motor function, were normalized regardless of surgical method--TE or TT. The impact of OSBD should be considered as one contributing factor in phonological impairment.

  • 12.
    McAllister, Anita
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Aanstoot, Janna
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lundeborg Hammarström, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Johannesson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sandström, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine.
    Berglind, Ulrika
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Physiotherapy. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Learning in the tutorial group: A balance between individual freedom and institutional control2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 1-2, p. 47-59Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study investigates factors in problem-based learning tutorial groups which promote or inhibit learning. The informants were tutors and students from speech-language pathology and physiotherapy programmes. Semi-structured focus-group interviews and individual interviews were used. Results revealed three themes: Responsibility, Time and Support. Under responsibility, the delicate balance between individual and institutional responsibility and control was shown. Time included short and long-term perspectives on learning. Under support, supporting documents, activities and personnel resources were mentioned. In summary, an increased control by the program and tutors decreases students motivation to assume responsibility for learning. Support in tutorial groups needs to adapt to student progression and to be well aligned to tutorial work to have the intended effect. A lifelong learning perspective may help students develop a meta-awareness regarding learning that could make tutorial work more meaningful.

  • 13.
    Myrberg, Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division Ageing and Social Change. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    The mini-mental state examination (MMSE) from a language perspective: an analysis of test interaction2019In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Assessment of language and cognitive abilities are associated with clinical challenges. The aim of the present study was to learn more about the MMSE test process from a language perspective by looking in detail at the interaction between patient and tester. In addition, we aimed to further explore the relationship between linguistic and cognitive difficulties. The study was based on an analysis of 20 MMSE test dyads, 10 persons with aphasia and 10 persons with dementia, in interaction with speech and language pathologists. All conversations were audio and video recorded and transcribed verbatim according to Conversation Analytical principles. The thorough analysis of the interactions highlighted some main findings that affected the communicative project of the test interactions. Finally, the test results were summarized and analyzed. Through the analysis, some particularly challenging aspects emerged; the understanding of the verbal instructions, the handling of the instructions and the evaluation of the answers. The test results demonstrated that there were no significant differences between the two groups of participants MMSE results. The results in the language category did not seem to capture the language disorders among many of the participants more than the remaining test items. By qualitative analyses of the interactional aspects of test situations, information about both cognitive and linguistic abilities that otherwise would have been overlooked may be revealed.

  • 14.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ball, Martin J.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Editorial Material: NICOLE MULLER and MARTIN J. BALL in CLINICAL LINGUISTICS and PHONETICS, vol 29, issue 8-10, pp 573-5742015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 8-10, p. 573-574Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Müller, Nicole
    et al.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette.
    Guendouzi, Jacqueline
    Southeastern Louisiana University, Hammond.
    Transcribing discourse: Interactions with Alzheimer's disease2002In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 345-359Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This paper illustrates the use of a 'discourse line' in transcribing spoken interaction between a person with Alzheimer's disease, and a visitor. Discourse is here interpreted as a metacategory, or an analytic level of interaction. We view transcribing as an integral part of 'doing discourse', and use two sub-layers of the discourse line, dedicated to speech acts and conversation analysis, respectively. The prosody and voice layer is used to show the analysis of a speaker's use of a specific voice quality in discourse terms.

  • 16.
    Nakeva von Mentzer, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Otorhinolaryngology in Linköping.
    Sahlén, Birgitta
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Dahlström, Örjan
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindgren, Magnus
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Ors, Marianne
    Humanities laboratory, Cognition, Communication & Learning, Lund University.
    Kallioinen, Petter
    Department of Linguistics, Stockholm University.
    Engström, Elisabet
    Karolinska Institutet (CLINTEC), Dept of Audiology and Neurootology, Karolinska University Hospital.
    Uhlén, Inger
    Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Rosenlunds sjukhus, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Segmental and suprasegmental properties in nonword repetition: An explorative study of the associations with nonword decoding in children with normal hearing and children with bilateral cochlear implants2015In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 29, no 3, p. 216-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study explored nonword repetition (NWR) and nonword decoding in normalhearing (NH) children and in children with cochlear implants (CIs). Participants were 11 children with bilateral CIs, 5:0-7:11 years (M = 6.5 yrs.), and 11 NH children, individually age-matched to the children with CIs. The purpose was twofold; to thoroughly describe aspects of repetition and decoding of novel words and to study possible associations between them. All children were assessed after having practiced with a computer-assisted reading intervention with a phonics approach during four weeks. Results showed that NH children outperformed children with CIs on the majority of aspects of NWR. The analysis of syllable length in NWR revealed that children with CIs made more syllable omissions than did the NH children, and predominantly in prestressed positions. Additionally, the consonant cluster analysis showed significantly more consonant omissions and substitutions in children with CIs suggesting that reaching fine- grained levels of phonological processing was particularly difficult for these children. No significant difference was found for decoding accuracy between the groups, as measured by percent nonwords and percent phonemes correctly decoded, but differences were observed regarding error patterns. Further, phoneme deletions and lexicalizing of nonwords occurred more often in children with CIs than in those with NH. The correlation analysis revealed that the ability to repeat consonant clusters in NWR had the strongest associations to nonword decoding in both groups.

  • 17.
    Papakyritsis, Ioannis
    et al.
    Western Illinois University, Macomb, USA.
    Müller, Nicole
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuroscience. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perceptual and acoustic analysis of lexical stress in Greek speakers with dysarthria2014In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 28, no 7-8, p. 555-572Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The study reported in this paper investigated the abilities of Greek speakers with dysarthria to signal lexical stress at the single word level. Three speakers with dysarthria and two unimpaired control participants were recorded completing a repetition task of a list of words consisting of minimal pairs of Greek disyllabic words contrasted by lexical stress location only. Fourteen listeners were asked to determine the attempted stress location for each word pair. Acoustic analyses of duration and intensity ratios, both within and across words, were undertaken to identify possible acoustic correlates of the listeners judgments concerning stress location. Acoustic and perceptual data indicate that while each participant with dysarthria in this study had some difficulty in signaling stress unambiguously, the pattern of difficulty was different for each speaker. Further, it was found that the relationship between the listeners judgments of stress location and the acoustic data was not conclusive.

  • 18.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Anward, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Culture. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Enhanced patient involvement in Swedish aphasia intervention2016In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 30, no 10, p. 730-748Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present article is a case study in which participation is investigated in terms of the use of interactional practices that enhance the involvement of a man with severe aphasia in activities that aim to capture his and his wifes experiences of everyday communication, and their views of his speech and language intervention. Five practices are identified: 1) collaborative telling, 2) formulations, 3) yes/no questions, 4) declaratives and 5) hint-and-guess strategies. It is demonstrated how participants (wife, a speech and language pathologist, and two research assistants) use of these practices are beneficial for making the viewpoints of the man with aphasia come across, despite his communication difficulties. Results are discussed in light of the importance of finding ways to make patients influence their own intervention, both in terms of a raised awareness of facilitative interactional practices and of activities such as interviews and retrospection sessions with patients and their significant others.

  • 19.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Speech and Language Pathology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Adolfsson, Elin
    Linköping Community, Sweden.
    Persson, Hanna
    Kiruna Hospital, Sweden.
    The use and characteristics of elderspeak in Swedish geriatric institutions2013In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 27, no 8, p. 616-631Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study is to investigate the occurrence of elderspeak in a Swedish context and to describe its characteristics. Elderspeak refers to adjustments made in communication with elderly people; adjustments similar to those made in interaction with infants. Previous findings show that adjustments of communication are made within several linguistic domains, and are a part of the communicative environment of elderly people. Five people working in different forms of geriatric institutions participated in this study, and data consist of recordings of interactions between caregivers and residents (without dementia) and interactions between caregivers and colleagues. The recordings were transcribed and analyzed by means of perceptual, semantic and acoustic analyses. The findings demonstrate that caregivers, to a varying extent, adjusted their communication within several linguistic domains. The adjustments were mainly made within the prosodic domain, but there were also adjustments made within other language domains.

  • 20.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    et al.
    Lund University.
    Löfqvist, Anders
    Lund University.
    The role of Swedish tonal word accents in children with language impairment2006In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 231-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present study was designed to examine the production of the Swedish tonal accents in children with language impairment and normal controls in order to verify previous findings. The productions of 25 children with linguistic impairment and their matched controls, aged 4;4-10;0 (mean age 5;11) were evaluated by ratings of fundamental frequency patterns, and by perceptual analysis by ten linguistically naive listeners to assess the distinctiveness of the accents. These methods give a more detailed description of the children's productions of tonal word accents. The results show that 60.8% of the children with language impairment have difficulties to produce the contrast of tonal word accents according to the F(0) patterns. The difference in the rating of the F(0) curves between the children with LI and their matched controls was significant. There is a significant positive correlation between the perceptual results and the F(0)-rating, indicating that the better a child was perceived, the better his/her F(0) production was rated. We conclude that the distinction between the tonal word accents is a difficult feature to acquire for Swedish children, which is shown both by acoustic and perceptual evaluations.

  • 21.
    Sundström, Simon
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Lofkvist, Ulrika
    Univ Oslo, Norway; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Lyxell, Björn
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Disability Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Speech language pathology, Audiology and Otorhinolaryngology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Prosodic and segmental aspects of nonword repetition in 4-to 6-year-old children who are deaf and hard of hearing compared to controls with normal hearing2018In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 32, no 10, p. 950-971Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) are at an increased risk of speech and language deficits. Nonword repetition (NWR) is a potential predictor of problems with phonology, grammar and lexicon in DHH children. The aim of the present study was to examine repetition of prosodic features and segments in nonwords by DHH children compared to children with normal hearing (NH) and to relate NWR performance to measures of language ability and background variables. In this cross-sectional study, 14 Swedish-speaking children with mild-profound sensorineural hearing loss, aged 4-6 years, and 29 age-matched controls with NH and typical language development participated. The DHH children used cochlear implants (CI), hearing aids or a combination of both. The assessment materials included a prosodically controlled NWR task, as well as tests of phonological production, expressive grammar and receptive vocabulary. The DHH children performed below the children with NH on the repetition of tonal word accents, stress patterns, vowels and consonants, with consonants being hardest, and tonal word accents easiest, to repeat. NWR performance was also correlated with language ability, and to hearing level, in the DHH children. Both prosodic and segmental features of nonwords are problematic for Swedish-speaking DHH children compared to children with NH, but performance on tonal word accent repetition is comparably high. NWR may have potential as a clinically useful tool for identification of children who are in need of speech and language intervention.

  • 22.
    Wilson, Brent T
    et al.
    Radford University, P.O. Box 6961, Radford.
    Müller, Nicole
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette,USA.
    Damico, Jack S.
    University of Louisiana at Lafayette,USA.
    The use of conversational laughter by an individual with dementia2007In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076, Vol. 21, no 11-12, p. 1001-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    While laughter has been shown to play a significant role in any social interaction; its conversational usage by a person with dementia has rarely been investigated. This paper will investigate the functional aspects of laughter during conversation in an individual with dementia. Conversation analysis is used in order to investigate laughter as a social phenomenon and to be able to investigate laughter in an empirical and authentic manner. The conversational strategies employed through laughter will be detailed and implications will be discussed.

  • 23.
    Yazdan Panah, Maziar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication, Language and Literature. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Plejert, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Samuelsson, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Jansson, Gunilla
    Linköping University, Department of Culture and Communication. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    An interactional perspective on sound prolongation in multilingual encounters in residential care2019In: Clinical Linguistics & Phonetics, ISSN 0269-9206, E-ISSN 1464-5076Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Elderspeak refers to adapting ones language to a perceived language decline of an older interlocutor. Earlier studies have explored different features of elderspeak; some of these studies attribute positive outcomes to using elderspeak that facilitates communication, but other studies consider elderspeak a negative way of communicating that should be avoided. The aim of this study is to investigate a largely unexplored feature of elderspeak, namely sound prolongation in a multilingual context. There are five participants in this study: three carers and two care recipients in a residential care unit. The carers and care recipients have limited access to a shared spoken language. The data consist of video- and audio recordings of interaction between the participants. The recordings have been transcribed and analysed in accordance with Conversation Analytical methodology. The analysis shows that the carers use sound prolongation as part of their interactional repertoire in order to manage situations of distress. We conclude that in some distressful situations carers use of sound prolongation may help mitigating the care recipients emotional concerns since the source of agitations has been addressed properly. In other situations, the use of sound prolongation may lead to an escalation in distress, if the source of agitation is not addressed adequately. Our results bring to the fore that an interactional practice, such as the use of sound prolongation in the context of expressed distress must be interpreted in relation to the complexity of each and every situation participants find themselves in, their level of understanding, and the task/activity at hand.

1 - 23 of 23
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