liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Kjerstin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Construction Young Masculinity: A Case of Heroic Discourse of Violence2008In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 19, no 2, p. 139-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In this article, a young man's narratives of violence are analysed, and a culturally shared storyline is identified as the basis of these narratives. It is argued that the stories are organized so as to construct a preferred self-presentation. One strategy to achieve this is to establish boundaries for what type of violence to use, whom to fight, where and for what reasons. I also argue that the narratives are structured to avoid being categorized as either victim or perpetrator, although both categories are drawn upon. Issues of masculinity are made relevant through categorization of the characters in the narrative, and positions are made available. Different masculine categories such as the hero/villain/non-man become relevant in the analysis. Different gendered positions are used in negotiating a masculine identity around narratives of and through telling about violence.

  • 2.
    Aronsson, Karin
    et al.
    Barn och ungdomsvetenskap, Stockholms universitet.
    Cekaite, Asta
    Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Activity contracts and directives in everyday family politics2011In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 22, no 2, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In theorizing on family life, childrens agency is a feature of a modern type of family, marked by free choice and inter-generational negotiations rather than parental authority. A video ethnography of Swedish everyday family life documents directive sequences and inter-generational negotiations, including what is here called activity contracts: agreements that form a type of inter-generational account work around target activities (e.g. cleaning ones room). Within local family politics, contracts and revised contracts emerge as parts of such account work. The analyses focus on how contracts emerge within successive downgradings and upgradings of parental directives. Activity contracts regulate mutual rights and obligations, invoking family rule statements and local moral order, drawing on an array of verbal and nonverbal resources, ranging from parents mitigated requests and childrens time bargaining to nonverbal escape strategies and gentle shepherding.

  • 3.
    Bülow, Pia
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Communications Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sharing Experiences of Contested Illness by Storytelling2004In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 15, no 1, p. 33-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on audiotaped conversations from a patient school for adults suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome, this article examines sharing experiences of illness as a mutual activity. The analysis shows that sharing experiences in this context is primarily of the narrative kind. Three main types of narratives were found: self-contained personal stories, orchestrated chained personal stories, and co-narrated collectivized stories. Through sharing three things seem to happen: (1) the participants jointly created experiential knowledge and a mutual image of the illness, (2) the individual sufferers could compare themselves to the jointly constructed image, (3) the active sharing of experience bestows a mutual confirmation of suffering irrespective of whether the individual’s experiences correspond or deviate from the common picture. Two parallel transitions seemed to occur: the transformation of personal experience into shared collectivized experiences and the transition when the individual sufferer perceives his/her private suffering through sharing experiences with co-sufferers.

  • 4.
    Eriksson (Barajas), Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Aronsson, Karin
    Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    ‘We’re really lucky’: co-creating ‘us’ and ‘the Other’ in school booktalk2005In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 719-738Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The present paper addresses how ‘Otherness’ is co-construed in booktalk in a Swedish school. The data consist of video-recorded teacher led booktalk sessions, involving small groups of pupils in grades 4–7. Seven of the eight books discussed were – at least partly – set in settings foreign to the present pupils. We found that a basic teacher device for constructing the ‘Other’, was to implicitly or explicitly compare a group of others to the participant children themselves, ‘us Swedish children’, accomplishing ‘Otherness’ by foregrounding differences, setting up a series of implicit or explicit contrasts between ‘them’ and ‘us’ (cf. Dickerson, 2001; Sampson, 1993). Such contrasts concerned: literacy and language skills (Extracts 1–2), ways of ‘sticking together’ (Extracts 3–4), as well as contrasts in terms of the distribution of material educational resources and work demands on children (Extracts 5–8). Moreover, the last extracts also illustrate how pupils co-construct the teachers’ implicit or explicit underlying moral agendas.

  • 5.
    Evaldsson, Ann-Carita
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies.
    Staging insults and mobilizing categorizations in a multiethnic peer group2005In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 763-786Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This study explores how pre-adolescent boys of immigrant and working-class backgrounds stage insults and, as part of this process, mobilize categorizations. Data are drawn from ethnographic research combined with detailed analysis (conversation analysis and membership categorization analysis) of video records from peer interactions in an elementary school in Sweden. It was found that the boys deploy multiple resources (of syntactic and phonetic shapes) provided by the talk of the prior speaker and the turn structure of different activities (i.e. games, ridiculing, gossiping) and transform this talk (shifting emphasis, substituting insult terms and pronouns, recycling arguments, repeating striking parts, code-crossing) to collaboratively stage a counter to insults. A variety of negative characteristics (concerning linguistic, social and economic standards) are invoked and negotiated in the boys' insult talk, which both colludes with and transgresses local norms of conduct and institutional discourses. Overall, this study demonstrates the political character of pre-adolescent children's everyday talk in terms of its orientation towards dominant language ideologies and the place that gender, ethnicity and social class occupy within it. Copyright © 2005 SAGE Publications.

  • 6.
    Gunnarsson, Nina
    et al.
    Jönköping University, Sweden.
    Hemmingsson, Helena
    Linköping University, Department of Social and Welfare Studies, Division of Health, Activity and Care. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hydén, Lars-Christer
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Health and Society. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Mothers’ accounts of healthcare encounters: Negotiating culpability and fulfilling the active mother role2013In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 24, no 4, p. 1-15Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    This article explores mothers’ accounts of initial interactions and encounters with healthcare professionals and the outcomes where questions about their children’s problems are concerned. A case-based storyline was reconstructed as part of the analysis, focusing on

    when and how mothers claimed to be responsible parents. The outcomes of these encounters were presented by the mothers in this study as a drawn-out process, with disagreement between mothers and healthcare providers, resulting in different performances of moral agency. Some mothers portrayed themselves as dependent on healthcare expertise and made moral claims by attributing and deflecting blame, negotiating back and forth about their own and the healthcare professionals’ culpability, restoring moral agency. Other mothers did not generally defend or justify their actions or place blame, but appealed instead to fulfilment of the active mother role where they controlled the interaction and claimed full responsibility for their child’s care, hence presenting their moral agency as indisputable.

  • 7.
    Hepburn, Alexa
    et al.
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Developments in discursive psychology2005In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 595-601Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Discursive psychology is the broad title for a range of research done in different disciplinary contexts – communication, language, sociology and psychology. It moves the theoretical and analytic focus from individual cognitive events and processes to situated interaction. This work is critical of, and developing a progressive, analytically based alternative to, mainstream cognitive social psychology. Discursive psychology (occasionally DP) also counters the social psychological view of the individual as part of a matrix of abstract social processes, and replaces it with a focus on people’s everyday practices in various institutional settings. This entails an important change in analytic focus; rather than whether, or how accurately, participants’ talk reflects inner and outer events, DP investigates how ‘psychology’ and ‘reality’ are produced, dealt with and made relevant by participants in and through interaction. Articles in this Special Issue will, therefore, take various social and psychological categories and consider their role in specific interactional settings. Our aim here is to set out three main strands of contemporary discursive psychology as a way of emphasizing some of the exciting and progressive features of the collection presented in this volume.

  • 8.
    Hepburn, Alexa
    et al.
    Loughborough University, UK.
    Wiggins, Sally
    University of Strathclyde, UK.
    Size matters: Constructing accountable bodies in NSPCC helpline interaction2005In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 16, no 5, p. 625-646Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The focus on body size or weight has become an increasing source of concern in western society, yet few studies have looked at how people invoke body size in various settings, and the practices to which such talk might be related. Hence this study examines instances in everyday and institutional interaction in which body size is treated as a relevant concern for speakers. A discursive psychological approach is used to examine five extracts from telephone calls to a National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children (NSPCC) helpline. The analysis focuses on how the weight or body size of others is constructed and managed, and how these descriptions can be involved in various activities. Three analytic themes emerge – the focus on how formulations of size and embodiment are drawn upon in practice; the relationship between issues of size and issues of knowledge; and the activities in which different size descriptions are enrolled, in particular, the way these activities relate to the institutional practices of the NSPCC helpline. The empirical claims about the data are also related back to basic theoretical questions, raising profound issues about the way traditional psychology has constructed eating and embodiment.

  • 9.
    Hydén, Margareta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    McCarthy, Imelda
    University College Dublin.
    Woman Battering and Father-Daughter Incest Disclosure: Conversations of Denial and Acknowledgement1994In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 5, no 4, p. 543-565Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 10.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Tema Institute, Department of Child Studies.
    Age in action. Membership work and stage of life categories in talk.2004In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 787-789Article, book review (Other academic)
  • 11.
    Tholander, Michael
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Thematic Studies, Department of Child Studies.
    Review of "Age in action"2004In: Discourse & Society, ISSN 0957-9265, E-ISSN 1460-3624, Vol. 15, no 6, p. 787-789Article in journal (Other academic)
1 - 11 of 11
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf