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  • 1. Andersson, T.
    et al.
    Anderson, C.
    Wårdell, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Biomedical Instrumentation. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Human in vivo cutaneous microdialysis: Estimation of histamine release in cold urticaria.1995In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, no 75, p. 343-347Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel bioanalytical in vivo sampling technique, cutaneous microdialysis, was used to follow the chronology of skin histamine release in 3 patients with cold urticaria and in 2 healthy volunteers. Laser Doppler perfusion imaging was used simultaneously to monitor the skin circulatory response. Microdialysis samples were collected at 10-min intervals and analysed by radioimmunoassay technique. Fifty minutes after probe insertion, the ventral forearm skin in the area of the dialysis membrane was provoked for 5-15 min with a 25 x 40 mm ice cube covered with plastic foil. In the cold urticaria patients, an up to 80-fold increase of histamine was observed, with peak levels 20-30 min after challenge. Histamine levels then fell to reach "baseline" levels within 50 min. In the healthy subjects, the histamine increase was earlier, less pronounced and of shorter duration. Cutaneous microdialysis and laser Doppler imaging offer new possibilities for the chronological multiparameter assessment of inflammatory skin disorders in vivo.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Thomas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Bruze, Magnus
    Gruvberger, Birgitta
    Björkner, Bert
    In vivo testing of the protection provided by non-latex gloves against a 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate-containing acetone-based dentin-bonding product2000In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 80, no 6, p. 435-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In dentistry, allergic contact dermatitis to acrylates and allergic contact urticaria to latex are important occupational hazards. There is a need to identify, non-latex gloves which are suitable for dental work but at the same time provide adequate protection against acrylate monomers. In a previous study, a new open-chamber system was used for testing the in vivo protection of 6 different gloves against an acrylate-containing ethanol-based dental adhesive. A nitrile glove gave the best protection among the gloves suitable for dental work. In the present study, the test model was used to investigate the in vivo protection of 7 non-latex gloves against a dental bonding product containing 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate (2-HEMA) in an acetone/water vehicle. Eight 2-HEMA-allergic patients participated. Two neoprene gloves gave the best protection. The protection of the poorest glove was comparable to that of the positive control (no glove). The study produced in vivo data useful in the implementation of individual preventative measures against contact allergy to acrylates.

  • 3.
    Assarsson, Malin
    et al.
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Med Diagnost, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Div Dermatol and Venereol, Sweden.
    Significant Changes in the Skin Microbiome in Patients with Chronic Plaque Psoriasis after Treatment with Narrowband Ultraviolet B2018In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 98, no 4, p. 428-436Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Changes in the skin microbiome have been shown to promote cutaneous inflammation. The skin microbiome of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis was analysed before and after treatment with narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB). Swab samples of the microbiome were taken from lesional and non-lesional skin of 26 patients. Microbiotas were characterized by sequencing 16S rRNA bacterial genes on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Lesional skin microbiome diversity correlated with psoriasis severity (measured with the Psoriasis Area and Severity Index; PASI). There was a significantly lower abundance of the phylum Firmicutes and the genus Staphylococcus in lesional skin compared with non-lesional skin before UVB treatment. Responders (amp;gt; 75% target Psoriasis Severity Index (PSI) improvement) had significantly lower abundance of the phyla Firmicutes in lesional and non-lesional skin and lower abundance of the genera Staphylococcus, Finegoldia, Anaerococcus, Peptoniphilus, Gardnerella, Prevotella and Clostridium in lesional skin after UVB treatment. Pseudomonas significantly decreased in lesional and non-lesional skin of treatment responders. These results suggest that skin microbiome alterations after UVB treatment could be related to treatment and treatment response.

  • 4.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Domer, Jakob
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Wäster, Petra
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Jerhammar, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Öllinger, Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Melanoma Growth and Progression After Ultraviolet A Irradiation: Impact of Lysosomal Exocytosis and Cathepsin Proteases2015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 7, p. 792-797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation is a risk factor for development of malignant melanoma. UVA-induced lysosomal exocytosis and subsequent cell growth enhancement was studied in malignant melanoma cell lines and human skin melanocytes. UVA irradiation caused plasma membrane damage that was rapidly repaired by calcium-dependent lysosomal exocytosis. Lysosomal content was released into the culture medium directly after irradiation and such conditioned media stimulated the growth of non-irradiated cell cultures. By comparing melanocytes and melanoma cells, it was found that only the melanoma cells spontaneously secreted cathepsins into the surrounding medium. Melanoma cells from a primary tumour showed pronounced invasion ability, which was prevented by addition of inhibitors of cathepsins B, D and L. Proliferation was reduced by cathepsin L inhibition in all melanoma cell lines, but did not affect melanocyte growth. In conclusion, UVA-induced release of cathepsins outside cells may be an important factor that promotes melanoma growth and progression.

  • 5.
    Bivik Eding, Cecilia
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Involved and Uninvolved Psoriatic Keratinocytes Display a Resistance to Apoptosis that may Contribute to Epidermal Thickness2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 7, p. 788-796Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriasis is a common autoimmune skin disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the apoptotic process is disturbed in psoriatic keratinocytes. In vitro culture of keratinocytes derived from both involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin, revealed higher viability and resistance to apoptosis following exposure to ultraviolet B, compared with cells from healthy controls. The position of apoptotic dysregulation was found to be upstream of cytochrome c release in the mitochondrial apoptotic pathway. Microarray transcriptome analysis revealed that 87 genes were differentially expressed in both involved and uninvolved psoriatic keratinocytes compared with controls. Among these, a general upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes and downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes were identified. This distinct apoptosis-resistant phenotype, unrelated to the inflammatory component of the disease, implies that intrinsic abnormalities in keratinocytes may contribute to the pathogenesis of psoriasis.

  • 6.
    Carlsson, Annica
    et al.
    Lund University, Sweden; Ängelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Svensson, Åke
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Baranovskaya, Irina
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Hindsen-Stenstrom, Monica
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Holt, Ingebjorg
    Angelholm Hospital, Sweden.
    Meding, Birgitta
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Stenberg, Berndt
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Stenlund, Hans
    Umeå University, Sweden.
    Ganemo, Agneta
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Scoring of Hand Eczema: Good Reliability of the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES)2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 2, p. 193-197Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is good agreement between dermatological staff and patients using the Hand Eczema Extent Score (HEES). The aim of this study was to assess inter-and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in dermatologists and intra-observer reliability of the HEES in patients with hand eczema. Six dermatologists assessed 18 patients twice. Only the hands of the patients were visible to the assessors. Patients performed a selfassessment twice. Inter-and intra-observer reliability was tested with intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). The mean HEES score for all dermatologists assessments was 21.0 (range 3.6-46.3). The corresponding mean scores for all patients own assessments were 24.9 (range 4.0-54.0). Inter-observer reliability in the dermatologists observations ICC classification was very good, median value 0.82 (range 0.56-0.92). The overall intra-observer reliability for the 6 dermatologists ICC classification was very good (range 0.88-0.94). Intra-observer reliability in the patients 2 self-assessments ICC classification was very good (ICC 0.95). In conclusion, HEES is a reliable tool for both dermatologists and patients to grade the extent of hand eczema.

  • 7.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    et al.
    Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Psoriasis and Pro-angiogenetic Factor CD93: Gene Expression and Association with Gene Polymorphism Suggests a Role in Disease Pathogenesis2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 8, p. 916-921Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    CD93 is involved in angiogenesis and inflammation, both of which are key processes in the pathogenesis of psoriasis. CD93 was studied in serum, peripheral blood mononuclear cells and skin of patients with psoriasis and controls. Furthermore, allele frequencies for CD93 single-nucleotide polymorphisms rs2749812 and rs2749817 were assessed in patients with psoriasis compared with controls and the effect of narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB) treatment on CD93 gene expression was evaluated in the skin of patients with psoriasis. CD93 gene expression was significantly increased in lesional and non-lesional skin from patients with psoriasis compared with controls. Immunohistochemistry revealed CD93 staining in dermal endothelial cells in lesional skin, and psoriasis was significantly associated with rs2749817 CD93 gene polymorphism. NB-UVB treatment of patients with psoriasis did not alter skin CD93 gene expression. Increased protein expression of CD93 psoriatic skin and association with the rs2749817 polymorphism suggests that CD93 plays a role in psoriasis disease pathogenesis.

  • 8.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sigurdardottir, Gunnthorunn
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlström, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kartul, Natalja
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jenmalm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Systemically elevated Th1-, Th2- and Th17-associated chemokines in psoriasis vulgaris before and after ultraviolet B treatment2013In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 93, no 5, p. 527-531Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Chemokines may contribute to the systemic inflammation that is linked to the increased risk of co-morbidities in patients with psoriasis. The aim of this study was to investigate circulating chemokines in patients with psoriasis and their relationship to disease severity. Analysis of plasma levels of chemokines in patients with psoriasis before narrowband ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy revealed increased expression of Th1-associated CXCL9 and -10, Th2-associated CCL17 and CCL22, and Th17-associated CCL20. CCL20 correlated with disease severity. UVB therapy reduced skin symptoms, but did not affect the chemokine levels in plasma. Anti-CD3 and anti-CD28-mediated activation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) caused a higher secretion of Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)-13 by PBMCs from patients with psoriasis than from healthy controls. The sustained high expression of inflammatory chemokines is a potential link to systemic inflammation in psoriasis. UVB therapy may be a more effective treatment of local rather than systemic inflammation.

  • 9.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Vegfors, Jenny
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Bivik, Cecilia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Overexpression of Psoriasin (S100A7) Contributes to Dysregulated Differentiation in Psoriasis.2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 441-448Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Psoriasin, which is highly expressed in psoriasis, is encoded by a gene located within the epidermal differentiation complex. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of endogenous psoriasin on disturbed keratinocyte differentiation in psoriasis. Immunohistochemical staining revealed a gradient of psoriasin expression in the psoriatic epidermis with highest expression in the suprabasal, differentiated layers. Induction of keratinocyte differentiation caused concurrent expression of psoriasin and the differentiation marker involucrin. The differentiation-induced psoriasin expression was found to be mediated by the protein kinase C pathway. The downregulation of psoriasin expression by small interfering RNA revealed that psoriasin mediates the expression of involucrin, desmoglein 1, transglutaminase 1 and CD24 in normal differentiation. The lentivirus-mediated overexpression of psoriasin, mimicking the psoriatic milieu, gave rise to an altered regulation of differentiation genes and an expression pattern reminiscent of that in psoriatic epidermis. These findings suggest that psoriasin contributes to the dysregulated differentiation process in the psoriasis epidermis.

  • 10.
    El-Nour, H.
    et al.
    Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden, Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, SE-171 76 Stockholm, Sweden.
    Lundeberg, L.
    Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Boman, A.
    U. of Occup. and Environ. Dermatol., Department of Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Chemistry.
    Hokfelt, T.
    Hökfelt, T., Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nordlind, K.
    Unit of Dermatology and Venereology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Galanin expression in a murine model of allergic contact dermatitis2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 6, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Galanin is a neuropeptide widely distributed in the nervous system. The expression of galanin was investigated in murine contact allergy using immunohistochemistry, radioimmunoassay and in situ hybridization. Female BALB/c mice were sensitized with oxazolone and 6 days later challenged on the dorsal surface of ears, while control mice received vehicle. After 24 h, one ear was processed for immunostaining using a biotinylated fluorescence technique, while the other ear was frozen and processed for radioimmunoassay or in situ hybridization. Galanin immunoreactive nerve fibres were more numerous (p < 0.01) in the eczematous compared with control ears. Double-staining with antibody to the nerve fibre marker PGP (protein gene product) 9.5 revealed co-localization of PGP 9.5 and galanin in nerve fibres. Radioimmunoassay demonstrated a decrease (p < 0.04) in galanin concentration in eczematous compared with control ears. Our results suggest a role for galanin in murine contact allergy.

  • 11.
    El-Nour, Husameldin
    et al.
    Unit of Dermatology and Venerology Karolinska Institutet.
    Lundberg, Lena
    Unit of Dermatology and Venerology Karolinska Institutet.
    Boman, Anders
    Unit of Occupational and Environmental Dermatology Karolinska Institutet.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of clinical chemistry. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Hökfelt, Tomas
    Department of Neuroscience Karolinska Institutet.
    Norlind, Klas
    Unit of Dermatology and Venerology Karolinska Institutet.
    Galanin Expression in a Murine Model of Allergic Contact Dermatitis2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, p. 428-432Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 12.
    Eriksson, Katarina
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Bodil
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Forsum, Urban
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Microbiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Microbiology.
    Larsson, P-G
    Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Central Hospital of Sko¨vde, Sweden.
    A double-blind treatment study of bacterial vaginosis with normal vaginal lactobacilli after an open treatment with vaginal clindamycin ovules2005In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 85, no 1, p. 42-46Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The expected 4-week cure rate after conventional treatment of bacterial vaginosis are only 65-70%. In an attempt to improve the cure rate by adding probiotic lactobacilli we performed a double-blind placebo-controlled study of adjuvant lactobacilli treatment after an open treatment with vaginal clindamycin ovules. Women with bacterial vaginosis as defined by Amsel's criteria were treated with clindamycin ovules. Vaginal smears were collected and analysed according to Nugent's criteria. During the following menstruation period the women used, as an adjuvant treatment, either lactobacilli-prepared tampons or placebo tampons. The lactobacilli tampons were loaded with a mixture of freeze-dried L. fermentum, L. casei var. rhamnosus and L. gasseri. The cure rate was recorded after the second menstruation period. There was no improvement in the cure rate after treatment with lactobacilli-containing tampons compared to placebo tampons, the cure rates as defined by Amsel's criteria were 56% and 62%, respectively, and 55% and 63%, as defined by Nugent's criteria. This is the first study to report cure rates for women with 'intermediate' wet smear ratings according to Nugent's classification and this group had an overall cure rate of 44%. The cure rate of treatment of bacterial vaginosis was not improved by using lactobacilli-prepared tampons for one menstruation.

  • 13.
    Eriksson, Therese
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Management and Engineering, Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Letter: Societal Cost of Skin Cancer in Sweden in 20112015In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 95, no 3, p. 347-348Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 14. Faergemann, J
    et al.
    Diehl, U
    Bergfelt, L
    Brodd, A
    Edmar, B
    Hersle, K
    Lindemalm, B
    Nordin, P
    Ringdahl, IR
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Scalp psoriasis: synergy between the Malassezia yeasts and skin irritation due to calcipotriol2003In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 83, p. 438-441Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 15.
    Falk, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    The overall agreement of proposed definitions of mucopurulent cervicitis in women at high risk of chlamydia infection2010In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, ISSN 0001-5555, Vol. 90, p. 506-511Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The overall agreement between different criteria for cervicitis in women infected with Chlamydia trachomatis and/or Mycoplasma genitalium, and in women who tested negative was examined. Women attending a clinic for sexually transmitted diseases were enrolled because of sexual partners’ suspected chlamydia infection. M. genitalium was tested in a sample of first-catch urine and an endocervical specimen, whereas specimens from four different sites were used for detection of C. trachomatis. Signs of friability and purulent endocervical discharge were documented at gynaecological examination. Specimens for microscopy were taken from the endocervix and urethra as well as the vaginal discharge, and bacterial vaginosis was examined for. The criteria being evaluated included cervical friability and/or pus; polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL)/epithelium cell ratio in the vaginal discharge; and more than 30 PMNL per high-power field in the endocervical smear. The overall agreement of the indicators of cervicitis in women infected with C. trachomatis and/or M. genitalium was 40.5% (15/37), and for those women with negative tests 35.3% (12/34). The criteria for cervicitis require further evaluation, including study of a control group of women at low risk of having a sexually transmitted infection.

  • 16.
    Falk, Lars
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Hegic, Sabina
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Wilson, Daniel
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Central Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Central County.
    Wiréhn, Ann-Britt
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Health Care Analysis. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Research & Development Unit in Local Health Care.
    Home-sampling as a Tool in the Context of Chlamydia trachomatis Partner Notification: A Randomized Controlled Trial2014In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 94, no 1, p. 72-74Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 17.
    Ghafouri, Bijar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Pain and Rehabilitation Center.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Microdialysis in Profiling Cytokines and Other Macromolecules in the Skin in Health and Disease: A Comment to Falcone et al.2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 10, p. 1269-1269Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 18.
    Högberg, Lotta
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Sokolski, Jan
    Department of Dermatology, Norrköping Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Pediatrics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Chronic Bullous Dermatosis of Childhood Associated with Coeliac Disease in a 6-year-old Boy2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 2, p. 158-159p. 158-159Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 19.
    Kettis Lindblad, Åsa
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin I.
    The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Sweden.
    Ring, Lena
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Maroti, Marianne
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    The role of dermatologists, nurses and pharmacists in chronic dermatological treatment: patient and provider views and experiences2006In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 202-208Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effectively co-ordinated treatment support from healthcare providers (doctors, nurses and pharmacists) may improve patients' adherence to treatment. The objective of this study was to identify patients' and providers' perceptions of the roles of different Healthcare providers in dermatological treatment. Focus groups were used in two types of fora: patients with chronic dermatological diseases (n =2×6) and healthcare providers (n =2×6), including doctors, nurses and pharmacists working in dermatological care. Data were analysed according to the Consensual Qualitative Research approach. The respondents viewed the roles of the providers as complementary, but poorly co-ordinated. Treatment support is provided mainly by the nurse. During the doctor's appointment, diagnosis and treatment decisions are often prioritized, leaving limited time for treatment support. The pharmacist's provision of support is constrained by the lack of privacy and clinical history of individual patients. The most apparent "gap" in the chain of treatment support was between the pharmacist and the other providers. There was a wish for improved interprofessional collaboration to avoid giving conflicting advice. There is a need to improve interprofessional collaboration in dermatology, in order to optimize treatment support in clinical practice.

  • 20. Kjellgren, Karin I
    et al.
    Ring, Lena
    Lindblad, Åsa Kettis
    Maroti, Marianne
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    To follow dermatological treatment regimens - Patients' and providers' views2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 6, p. 445-450Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Adherence to long-term therapy for chronic illness is on average 50%. However, regarding adherence to dermatological treatment the existing literature is limited. The aim of the study was to acquire an understanding of issues associated with adherence to dermatological therapy. Focus group interviews were used in two types of fora: patients with chronic dermatological diseases and health care providers, including doctors, nurses and pharmacists working in dermatological care. Results reveal the providers' view of a suboptimal rate of adherence. According to both providers and patients, factors affecting adherence were patients' expectations and experiences of therapeutic effect, possibilities for the patient to take active part in treatment decisions, as well as mode of administration and type of medication. Suggested strategies for improvement are individualized patient education, continuous treatment support with assessment of medication-taking behaviour and enhanced communication skills among the providers.

  • 21.
    Loden, M
    et al.
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Andersson, AC
    Anderson, C
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Bergbrant, IM
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Frodin, T
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Ohman, H
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting.
    Sandstrom, MH
    Sarnhult, T
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Voog, E
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Stenberg, B
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Pawlik, E
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Preisler-Haggqvist, A
    ACO Hud AB, Stockholm, Sweden Univ Uppsala Hosp, Uppsala, Sweden Linkoping Univ Hosp, S-58185 Linkoping, Sweden Sahlgrens Univ Hosp, S-41345 Gothenburg, Sweden Umea Univ Hosp, S-90185 Umea, Sweden Malmo Univ Hosp, Malmo, Sweden Karolinska Inst, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Svensson, A
    Lindberg, M
    A double-blind study comparing the effect of glycerin and urea on dry, eczematous skin in atopic patients2002In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 82, no 1, p. 45-47Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Moisturizing creams have beneficial effects in the treatment of dry, scaly skin, but they may induce adverse skin reactions. In a randomized double-blind study, 197 patients with atopic dermatitis were treated with one of the following: a new moisturizing cream with 20% glycerin, its cream base without glycerin as placebo, or a cream with 4% urea and 4% sodium chloride. The patients were asked to apply the cream at least once daily for 30 days. Adverse skin reactions and changes in skin dryness were assessed by the patient and a dermatologist. Adverse skin reactions such as smarting (a sharp local superficial sensation) were felt significantly less among patients using the 20% glycerin cream compared with the urea-saline cream, because 10% of the patients judged the smarting as severe or moderate when using glycerin cream, whereas 24% did so using urea-saline cream (p

  • 22.
    Loden, Marie
    et al.
    Research and Development, ACO HUD Nordic AB, Upplands Väsby, Sweden, ACO Hud Nordic AB, Box 622, SE-194 26 Upplands Väsby, Sweden.
    Ungerth, Louise
    Stockholm Consumer Cooperative Society, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Changes in European legislation make it timely to introduce a transparent market surveillance system for cosmetics2007In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 87, no 6, p. 485-492Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
    Abstract [en]

    Marketing of cosmetics often makes strong claims linked to active ingredients. This is especially so for anti-ageing products, where the presentation and content of "active" ingredients may create new difficulties in their classification as cosmetics or medicinal products. A recent change in European legislation classifies a product as medicinal by virtue of its "function", in addition to the previous definition of "presentation" (i.e. marketing linked to diseases). Thus, formulations that also restore, correct or modify physiological functions by exerting a pharmacological, immunological or metabolic action should henceforth be covered by the Medicinal Products Directive. A cosmetic product must be suitable for its purpose and should not lead to adverse reactions that are disproportional in relation to its intended effect. However, the forthcoming ban on animal testing of cosmetic ingredients and the new European regulation, REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of Chemicals), which aims to ensure a high level of chemical safety to protect human health and the environment, will probably have limited impact on the safety assessment of cosmetics. In order to enable consumers to make informed purchasing decisions, greater transparency in the process of assessing the performance of cosmetics is needed. Introduction of a more transparent system, enabling consumers and professionals to examine the scientific evidence for the claimed effect and the safety assessment of cosmetics, is therefore timely. Lack of transparency increases the risk of consumers wasting money on cosmetics that do not deliver the desired effects. This may jeopardize public trust in the cosmetic industry.

  • 23.
    Lönndahl, Louise
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Holst, Mikael
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hosp, Sweden.
    Bradley, Maria
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Killasli, Hassan
    Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden; Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Heilborn, Johan
    Hudctr, Sweden.
    Hall, Martin A.
    Stad Läkarmottagning, Sweden.
    Theodorsson, Elvar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Chemistry.
    Holmberg, Jadwiga
    Swedish Psoriasis Assoc Enskede, Sweden.
    Nordlind, Klas
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Substance P Antagonist Aprepitant Shows no Additive Effect Compared with Standardized Topical Treatment Alone in Patients with Atopic Dermatitis2018In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 98, no 3, p. 324-328Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is a chronic, itchy, inflammatory skin disorder that may worsen due to stress and anxiety. Tachykinins have been suggested to be involved in the inflammation in AD, as well as pruritus. Aprepitant is a NK-1 receptor antagonist. This open randomized trial evaluated the effect of aprepitant added to topical treatment in adult patients with moderate-severe AD. The treatment group (n = 19) received 80 mg/day aprepitant for 7 days as a supplement to standardized topical treatment with a moderately strong steroid and a moisturizer. The control group (n = 20) received topical treatment alone. Patients were monitored for the extent of the disease (using SCORing of Atopic Dermatitis; SCORAD), pruritus, and scratching movements. In both the aprepitant-treated and the control groups there was a decrease in SCORAD, pruritus and scratching movements. How-ever, there was no significant additional improvement in any of these parameters in the aprepitant-treated group compared with the control group.

  • 24.
    Nordenfelt, Patrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Mats
    Futurum, Sweden.
    Björkander, Jan Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Futurum, Sweden.
    Mallbris, Lotus
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Lindfors, Anders
    Astrid Lindgren Childrens Hospital, Sweden.
    Wahlgren, Carl-Fredrik
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Hereditary Angioedema in Swedish Adults: Report From the National Cohort2016In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 96, no 4, p. 540-545Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is rare, disabling and sometimes life-threatening. The aim of this study is to describe its prevalence, symptomatology and treatment in Sweden. A total of 146 patients were identified; 110 adults and 36 children with HAE type I (n = 136) or II (n = 10), giving a minimum HAE prevalence of 1.54/100,000. All patients received a written questionnaire followed by a structured telephone interview. This report focuses on the 102 adults who responded. Females reported 19 attacks in the previous year vs. 9 for males (p &lt; 0.01), and females reported 10 days of sick leave vs. 4 days for males (p &lt; 0.05). For all treated acute attacks, plasma-derived Cl-inhibitor concentrate (pdClINH) (used in 27% of patients) had a good effect. For maintenance treatment, 43% used attenuated androgens and 8% used pdClINH, which reduced their attack rate by more than 50%. In conclusion, the minimum HAE prevalence in Sweden was 1.54/100,000. HAE affected females more severely. Attenuated androgens and pdClINH had a good effect on preventing attacks.

  • 25. Sandberg, Carin
    et al.
    Stenquist, Bo
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Ros, Anne-Marie
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Karlsson, Maria
    Gudmundson, Fredrik
    Ericson, Marica B
    Larkö, Olle
    Wennberg, Ann-Marie
    Important factors for pain during photodynamic therapy for actinic keratosis2006In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 86, no 5, p. 404-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an efficient treatment for actinic keratosis. A common problem, however, is pain. The aim of this study was to investigate pain during PDT for actinic keratosis. The possibility of using capsaicin cream for pain relief was also assessed. Pain was investigated during aminolaevulinic acid PDT in 91 patients. Size, redness, scaling and induration of the lesions were recorded. Maximum pain during treatment was registered, using a visual analogue scale (0-10). The pain-reducing efficacy of capsaicin was tested in a pilot study in six patients (10 lesions). These patients were pre-treated with capsaicin cream for one week before commencing PDT. Pain was found to be normally distributed around a mean value of visual analogue scale 4.6. Larger lesions gave more pain (p=0.001). The redness of the actinic lesions was found to be related to PDT-induced pain (p=0.01), the reduction of actinic area (p=0.007), and the cure rate (p=0.01). The redder the actinic area, the better the treatment outcome and the more pain experienced. Patients with the largest reduction in the actinic area experienced more pain (p=0.053). The most important factors for presence of pain seem to be the size and the redness of the lesion. No significant pain relief was experienced after pre-treatment with capsaicin. © 2006 Acta Dermato-Venereologica.

  • 26.
    Serup, Jörgen
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Kettis Lindblad, Åsa
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Maroti, Marianne
    Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Kjellgren, Karin I
    Institute of Nursing Faculty of Health and Caring Sciences, The Sahlgrenska Academy at Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden.
    Niklasson, Eva
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Dermatology and Venerology.
    Ring, Lena
    Department of Pharmacy, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ahlner, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    To follow or not to follow dermatological treatment: A review of the literature2006In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 86, no 3, p. 193-197Article, review/survey (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Creams, ointments and solutions applied to the skin surface by patients as part of a daily routine might be expected to provide a more variable dosage than do standard tablets. However, adherence to treatment in dermatology has been little studied. This article reviews recent publications in the field. These are dominated by questionnaire-based studies, which tend to over-estimate adherence. Reduced adherence to dermatological treatment is noted in 34-45% of patients. It is likely that the percentage of patients who practice truly optimal treatment in their daily life is even lower considering the variable practice of self-treatment. Self-reported psychiatric morbidity contributes to poor adherence to dermatological treatment, while a well-functioning doctor-patient interaction is a major determinant of good adherence, as is patient satisfaction. In conclusion, adherence to dermatological treatment is unsatisfactory and there is a need for intervention and change in clinical routines. The therapeutic and economic benefits may be considerable. The immediate challenge is to stimulate a change in patient behaviour and improve self-treatment at home. © 2006 Acta Dermato-Venereologica.

  • 27.
    Sjögren, Florence
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Sterile trauma to normal human dermis invariably induces IL1beta, IL6 and IL8 in an innate response to "danger".2009In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 89, no 5, p. 459-465Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microdialysis allows the study of the local production and temporal resolution of cytokines in living skin. Samples were taken from the normal skin of 10 healthy subjects for 24-28 h after insertion of a concentric microdialysis catheter, and analysed with a Luminex bead-based assay. Interleukin-1 beta (IL1b), IL6 and IL8 were seen in all subjects at all time-points after the first hour. Levels peaked at 5-8 h, equilibrating to lower levels at 24 h. Immunohistological double staining for human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and intracellular cytokines on biopsies taken after catheter removal showed many stained cells in the dermis, in contrast to the few cells stained in the epidermis. This study demonstrates the reactive capability of the dermis when provoked separately from the epidermis. The production of IL1b, IL6 and IL8 occurs invariably in what can be termed an innate, dermal response to "danger"; in this case in the form of sterile needle trauma.

  • 28.
    Sjögren, Florence
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Andersson, C.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Groth, O.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    The cellular dermal infiltrate in experimental immediate type cutaneous hypersensitivity1995In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 75, no 6, p. 417-421Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A previously developed guinea pig model for the study of the dermal inflammatory cell infiltrate of allergic, toxic, and irritant reactions was adapted to the study of the immediate intradermal reaction to ovalbumin, Comparison of qualitative and quantitative counts of infiltrating cells at three levels in the dermis showed that counting 20 subepidermal fields starting from the injection point of the allergen gave reliable figures, The reaction showed microscopically two phases. The first was of rapid onset and characterized by a high proportion of neutrophils, unlike the picture seen in the previously studied (allergic and toxic) reaction types. In the second phase, which can be termed 'late phase' reaction, mononuclear cells and basophil granulocytes predominated. The late phase of the reaction bears similarities to the delayed allergic contact reaction at the same timepoint in that the response was rich in basophils. There were, however, other differences; e.g, eosinophils and neutrophils were more common.

  • 29.
    Sjögren, Florence
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology.
    Ljunghusen, O
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Baas, A
    Coble, Britt-Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Stendahl, Olle
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Expression and function of beta-2 integrein CD11B/CD18 on leukocytes from patients with psoriasis. 1999In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 79, p. 105-110Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 30.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Nilsson, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Frequency and distribution pattern of melanocytic naevi in Swedish 8-9-year-old children2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, no 4, p. 271-276Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The naevus profile was examined in a Swedish cohort of 8-9-year-old children, 524/545 individuals (96%) were examined (279 boys and 245 girls). There was a wide variation in the total number of naevi (0-79) and boys had more naevi than girls (median 9 and 7, respectively, p<0.01). No dysplastic naevi were found. Overall, 15/524 (3%) had at least one lesion clinically diagnosed as a congenital melanocytic naevus. Boys had more naevi on the face (median 1) and trunk (median 5) than girls (median 0 and 3, respectively, p<0.001). There was no difference in the number of naevi on the legs between the two sexes. The highest counts per unit surface area for both sexes were found on the back, chest and the lateral aspect of the arms, areas intermittently sun-exposed. Children with fair skin and light eye colours had significantly more naevi than those with darker colours but children with red hair had very few naevi. Children with one or more naevi on the buttocks (25%), dorsal surfaces of the feet (11%) or on the scalp (7%) had twice as many naevi in total compared with those without naevi in these regions. Children with naevi in all three regions (0.8%) had four times as many naevi in total. A relationship between total counts and counts on the back or lateral aspect of the arms was found (r2=0.59). Either of these two areas might be suitable for predicting total naevus counts.

  • 31. Tarstedt, Mikael
    et al.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Berne, Berit
    Svanberg, Katarina
    Wennberg, Ann-Marie
    A randomized multicenter study to compare two treatment regimens of topical methyl aminolevulinate (Metvix®)-PDT in actinic keratosis of the face and scalp2005In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 85, no 5, p. 424-428Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) with topical methyl aminolevulinate (MAL) administered in two treatment sessions separated by 1 week is an effective treatment for actinic keratoses. This open prospective study compared the efficacy and safety of MAL-PDT given as a single treatment with two treatments of MAL-PDT 1 week apart. Two hundred and eleven patients with 413 thin to moderately thick actinic keratoses were randomized to either a single treatment with PDT using topical MAL (regimen I, n=105) or two treatments 1 week apart (regimen II, n=106). Each treatment involved surface debridement, application of Metvix® cream (160 mg/g) for 3 h, followed by illumination with red light using a light-emitting diode system (peak wavelength 634±3 nm, light dose 37 J/cm2). Thirty-seven lesions (19%) with a non-complete response 3 months after a single treatment were re-treated. All patients were followed up 3 months after the last treatment. A total of 400 lesions, 198 initially treated once and 202 treated twice, were evaluable. Complete response rate for thin lesions after a single treatment was 93% (95% CI=87-97%), which was similar to 89% (82-96%) after repeated treatment. Response rates were lower after single treatment of thicker lesions (70% (60-78%) vs 84% (77-91%)), but improved after repeated treatment (88% (82-94%)). The conclusion of this study is that single treatment with topical MAL-PDT is effective for thin actinic keratosis lesions, however, repeated treatment is recommended for thicker or non-responding lesions. © 2005 Taylor & Francis.

  • 32.
    Taylor, Adam
    et al.
    Fibrosis and Lung Injury DPU, England.
    Budd, David C.
    Fibrosis and Lung Injury DPU, England.
    Shih, Barbara
    University of Manchester, England.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Ryhov Hospital, Sweden.
    Beaton, Andrew
    GlaxoSmithKline, England.
    Wright, Tracey
    Fibrosis and Lung Injury DPU, England.
    Dempsey, Maria
    GlaxoSmithKline, England.
    Kelly, Fiona
    GlaxoSmithKline, England.
    Egerton, Julie
    GlaxoSmithKline, England.
    Marshall, Richard P.
    Fibrosis and Lung Injury DPU, England.
    Aston, Nicola
    Fibrosis and Lung Injury DPU, England.
    Bayat, Ardeshir
    University of Manchester, England; University of Manchester, England.
    Transforming Growth Factor Beta Gene Signatures are Spatially Enriched in Keloid Tissue Biopsies and Ex vivo-Cultured Keloid Fibroblasts2017In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 97, no 1, p. 10-16Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The keloid lesion is recognised as a spatially heterogeneous mass both in cellular and acellular composition and biological activity. Here, we have utilised a bioinformatic approach to determine whether this spatial heterogeneity is also evident at the molecular level and to identify key upstream regulators of signalling pathways enriched in the lesion in a spatially-restricted manner. Differentially expressed genes (20% change, p amp;lt; 0.05) obtained from microarray datasets derived from whole keloid biopsies and ex vivo-cultured keloid fibroblasts, both from distinct regions of the keloid lesion (leading edge, centre, and top) have been analysed to show that the TGF beta family plays a significant but spatially dependent role in regulation of keloid gene expression. Furthermore, we have identified additional upstream signalling molecules involved in driving keloid biology and provide information on therapeutic targets whose modulation might be expected to lead to significant therapeutic efficacy.

  • 33. Thomsen, JS
    et al.
    Benfeldt, E
    Jensen, SB
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Menné, T
    Topically applied aspirin decreases histamine-induced wheal and flare reactions in normal and SLS-inflamed skin, but does not decrase itch. A randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled human study2002In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 82, p. 30-35Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 34.
    Tinghög, Gustav
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Carlsson, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Health Technology Assessment and Health Economics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Societal Cost of Skin Cancer in Sweden 20052008In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 88, no 5, p. 467-473Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Skin cancer is one of the most rapidly increasing cancers among the Swedish population and a significant cause of illness and death. This study aims to estimate the total societal cost of skin cancer in Sweden 2005, using a prevalence based cost-of-illness approach. The total cost of skin cancer was estimated to € 142.4 million (€ 15 per inhabitant), of which € 79.6 million (€ 8 per inhabitant) were spent on health services and € 62.8 million (€ 7 per inhabitant) were due to production loss. The main cost driver was resource utilisation in outpatient care, amounting to 42.2% of the total cost. Melanoma was the most costly skin cancer diagnosis. Non-melanoma skin cancer was however the main cost driver for health services alone. In the future it is important to establish effective preventive measures to avoid increasing costs and suffering caused by skin cancer.

  • 35. Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Low, Aili
    Dyster-Aas, Johan
    Kildal, Morten
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Pruritus, personality traits, and coping in long-term follow-up of burn injured patients2004In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 84, p. 375-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background Pruritus is a health problem after severe burn injury. In general, chronic pruritus is associated with psychological variables such as personality and coping. These associations have not been explored in burn patients, and long-term follow-ups are lacking. Objectives To assess frequency of pruritus and the role of personality traits and coping in pruritus long after a burn injury. Patients and methods The participants were recovered burn victims treated at the Burn Unit of Uppsala University Hospital 1-18 (mean 9.3) years earlier. Pruritus was assessed with one item in the Burn Specific Health Scale, personality was assessed with the Swedish universities Scales of Personality, and coping was assessed with the Coping with Burns Questionnaire. Results Almost 60% of the participants had pruritus at follow-up. In stepwise logistic regressions, the personality trait Psychic trait anxiety and extent of burn (TBSA) explained 14 % of occasional pruritus. Further, 39 % of persistent pruritus was explained by the trait Lack of assertiveness, and the coping styles Instrumental action and Emotional Support, TBSA, and time since injury. Conclusion The majority of recovered burn patients reported chronic post-burn pruritus. Besides recency and extent of injury, maladaptive personality traits and coping styles were associated with the rating of pruritus. Psychological or psychiatric assessments may therefore be useful in the clinical follow-up of burn patients with chronic pruritus.

  • 36.
    Wyon, Yvonne
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Obstetrics and gynecology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Gynaecology and Obstetrics in Linköping.
    Synnerstad, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of dermatology and venereology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Spectrophotometric analysis of melanocytic naevi during pregnancy2007In: Acta Dermato-Venereologica, ISSN 0001-5555, E-ISSN 1651-2057, Vol. 87, no 3, p. 231-237Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Malignant melanoma is the most common cancer during pregnancy, but it is unknown whether melanocytic naevi in general are activated. A total of 381 melanocytic naevi in 34 Caucasian primigravidae were examined using spectrophotometric intracutaneous analysis (SIAscopy) technology in early pregnancy and prior to delivery. The Siagraphs of each naevus were then compared in order to evaluate changes over time. A total of 163 melanocytic naevi in 21 nulliparous women served as an additional control group. At the first visit none of the Siagraphs examined for the case or control groups aroused suspicion of dysplastic naevus or melanoma and no significant structural changes were noted during the observation period. However, 2.1% of the melanocytic naevi in the pregnant group increased and 1.3% decreased in size. Corresponding figures in the non-pregnant group were 1.8% and 0%, respectively. Only one naevus in a pregnant woman increased slightly in epidermal pigmentation, and a decrease in pigmentation was noted in 3.7% of the melanocytic naevi in the cases and 1.8% in the controls. None of the differences within or between the groups was statistically significant. We conclude that pregnancy does not influence the appearance of pigmented naevi. A changing naevus during pregnancy should be examined carefully and considered for excision and histopathology. © 2007 Acta Dermato-Venereologica.

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