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  • 1.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Validation of the burn intervention score in a National Burn Centre2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, no 5, p. 1159-1166Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Linköping burn score has been used for two decades to calculate the cost to the hospital of each burned patient. Our aim was to validate the Burn Score in a dedicated Burn Centre by analysing the associations with burn-specific factors: percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA%), cause of injury, patients referred from other (non-specialist) centres, and survival, to find out which of these factors resulted in higher scores. Our second aim was to analyse the variation in scores of each category of care (surveillance, respiration, circulation, wound care, mobilisation, laboratory tests, infusions, and operation).

    We made a retrospective analysis of all burned patients admitted during the period 2000–15. Multivariable regression models were used to analyse predictive factors for an increased daily burn score, the cumulative burn score (the sum of the daily burn scores for each patient) and the total burn score (total sum of burn scores for the whole group throughout the study period) in addition to sub-analysis of the different categories of care that make up the burn score.

    We retrieved 22 301 daily recordings for inpatients. Mobilisation and care of the wound accounted for more than half of the total burn score during the study. Increased TBSA% and age over 45 years were associated with increased cumulative (model R2 0.43, p < 0.001) and daily (model R2 0.61, p < 0.001) burn scores. Patients who died had higher daily burn scores, while the cumulative burn score decreased with shorter duration of hospital stay (p < 0.001).

    To our knowledge this is the first long term analysis and validation of a system for scoring burn interventions in patients with burns that explores its association with the factors important for outcome. Calculations of costs are based on the score, and it provides an indicator of the nurses’ workload. It also gives important information about the different dimensions of the care provided from thorough investigation of the scores for each category.

  • 2.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Lidocaine infusion has a 25% opioid-sparing effect on background pain after burns: A prospective, randomised, double-blind, controlled trial2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The pain of a burn mainly results from the inflammatory cascade that is induced by the injured tissue, and is classified as background, breakthrough, procedural and postoperative pain. High doses of opioids are usually needed to treat background pain, so its management includes a combination of types of analgesia to reduce the side effects. Lidocaine given intravenously has been shown in two small, uncontrolled studies to have an appreciable effect on pain after burns.

    Objectives

    In this prospective double-blind controlled trial we aimed to examine and quantify the opioid-sparing effect of a continuous infusion of lidocaine for the treatment of background pain during the early period after a burn.

    Methods

    Adult patients injured with burns of >10 total body surface area burned (TBSA%) and treated with a morphine based patient-controlled analgesia device (PCA) were randomised to have either lidocaine infusion starting with a bolus dose (1 mg lidocaine/kg) followed by continuous infusion (180 mg lidocaine/hour) or a placebo infusion, for seven consecutive days. Total daily consumption of opioids (mg) and amount of pain (visual analogue score, VAS) were recorded.

    Results

    We included 19 patients, 10 of whom were given a lidocaine infusion. There were no differences between groups in VAS, TBSA%, time of enrolment to the study since the initial burn, or duration of hospital stay. The opioid consumption in the lidocaine group declined by roughly 25% during the period of the study.

    Conclusion

    An intravenous infusion of lidocaine was safe and had an opioid-sparing effect when treating background pain in burns.

  • 3.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Use of the burn intervention score to calculate the charges of the care of burns2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 2, p. 303-309Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background To our knowledge this is the first published estimate of the charges of the care of burns in Sweden. The Linköping Burn Interventional Score has been used to calculate the charges for each burned patient since 1993. The treatment of burns is versatile, and depends on the depth and extension of the burn. This requires a flexible system to detect the actual differences in the care provided. We aimed to describe the model of burn care that we used to calculate the charges incurred during the acute phase until discharge, so it could be reproduced and applied in other burn centres, which would facilitate a future objective comparison of the expenses in burn care. Methods All patients admitted with burns during the period 2010–15 were included. We analysed clinical and economic data from the daily burn scores during the acute phase of the burn until discharge from the burn centre. Results Total median charge/patient was US$ 28 199 (10th–90th centiles 4668-197 781) for 696 patients admitted. Burns caused by hot objects and electricity resulted in the highest charges/TBSA%, while charges/day were similar for the different causes of injury. Flame burns resulted in the highest mean charges/admission, probably because they had the longest duration of stay. Mean charges/patient increased in a linear fashion among the different age groups. Conclusion Our intervention-based estimate of charges has proved to be a valid tool that is sensitive to the procedures that drive the costs of the care of burns such as large TBSA%, intensive care, and operations. The burn score system could be reproduced easily in other burn centres worldwide and facilitate the comparison regardless of the differences in the currency and the economic circumstances.

  • 4.
    Aboelnaga, Ahmed
    et al.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Adly, Osama A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Elbadawy, Mohamed A.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abbas, Ashraf H.
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Abdelrahman, Islam
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Salah, Omar
    Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Microbial cellulose dressing compared with silver sulphadiazine for the treatment of partial thickness burns: A prospective, randomised, clinical trial2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 8, p. 1982-1988Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The current treatment for partial thickness burns at the trial site is silver sulphadiazine, as it minimises bacterial colonisation of wounds. Its deleterious effect on wound healing, together with the need for repeated, often painful, procedures, has brought about the search for a better treatment. Microbial cellulose has shown promising results that avoid these disadvantages. The aim of this study was therefore to compare microbial cellulose with silver sulphadiazine as a dressing for partial thickness burns.

    Method

    All patients who presented with partial thickness (superficial and deep dermal) burns from October 2014 to October 2016 were screened for this randomised clinical trial. Twenty patients were included in each group: the cellulose group was treated with microbial cellulose sheets and the control group with silver sulphadiazine cream 10 mg/g. The wound was evaluated every third day. Pain was assessed using the Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) scale during and after each procedure. Other variables recorded were age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), clinical signs of infection, time for epithelialisation and hospital stay. Linear multivariable regression was used to analyse the significance of differences between the treatment groups by adjusting for the size and depth of the burn, and the patient’s age.

    Results

    Median TBSA% was 9% (IQR 5.5–12.5). The median number of dressing changes was 1 (IQR 1–2) in the cellulose group, which was lower than that in the control group (median 9.5, IQR 6–16) (p < 0.001). Multivariable regression analysis showed that the group treated with microbial cellulose spent 6.3 (95% CI 0.2–12.5) fewer days in hospital (p = 0.04), had a mean score that was 3.4 (95% CI 2.5–4.3) points lower during wound care (p < 0.001), and 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–2.7) afterwards (p < 0.001). Epithelialisation was quicker, but not significantly so.

    Conclusion

    These results suggest that the microbial cellulose dressing is a better first choice for treatment of partial thickness burns than silver sulphadiazine cream. Fewer dressings of the wound were done and, combined with the low pain scores, this is good for both the patients and the health care system. The differences in randomisation of the area of burns is, however, a concern that needs to be included in the interpretation of the results.

  • 5.
    Abrahams, M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Oscarsson, Anna
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    The effects of human burn injury on urinary nitrate excretion. 1999In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 25, p. 29-33Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Antepohl, Wolfram
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine UHL.
    Dahle, Charlotte
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Interleukin-8 is elevated in cerebrospinal fluid following high-voltage electrical injury with late-onset paraplegia suggesting neuronal damage at the microlevel as causative factor2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 3, p. e7-e9Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The patient, a 31-year-old male, sustained an electric burn injury (16 kV, AC/DC) while working with electric power lines. He was acutely admitted to a national burn center in Southeast Sweden, where burns equalling 29% of the total body surface area were noted. The burns were located at the front of the abdomen, upper arms bilaterally, and the left hip region, and the lesions were estimated to be mainly of the dermal type, what was believed initially to be caused mainly by an electric flash. There were no obvious entry or exit sites of the electric current. However, myoglobin in plasma was elevated as a sign of muscular degradation, suggesting that at least some current had passed through the tissues. According to the paramedic report there was an episode of a few minutes of unconsciousness immediately after the injury, but the patient was fully awake and alert on admission. There was no concomitant trauma.

  • 7.
    Bak, Zoltan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Eriksson, Olle
    Linköping University, Department of Computer and Information Science, Statistics. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Janerot Sjöberg, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Cardiac dysfunction after burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 603-609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives

    Using transoesophageal echocardiography (TEE) we investigated the occurrence, and the association of possible abnormalities of motion of the regional wall of the heart (WMA) or diastolic dysfunction with raised troponin concentrations, or both during fluid resuscitation in patients with severe burns.

    Patients and methods

    Ten consecutive adults (aged 36–89 years, two women) with burns exceeding 20% total burned body surface area who needed mechanical ventilation were studied. Their mean Baux index was 92.7, and they were resuscitated according to the Parkland formula. Thirty series of TEE examinations and simultaneous laboratory tests for myocyte damage were done 12, 24, and 36 h after the burn.

    Results

    Half (n = 5) the patients had varying grades of leakage of the marker that correlated with changeable WMA at 12, 24 and 36 h after the burn (p ≤ 0.001, 0.044 and 0.02, respectively). No patient had WMA and normal concentrations of biomarkers or vice versa. The mitral deceleration time was short, but left ventricular filling velocity increased together with stroke volume.

    Conclusion

    Acute myocardial damage recorded by both echocardiography and leakage of troponin was common, and there was a close correlation between them. This is true also when global systolic function is not deteriorated. The mitral flow Doppler pattern suggested restrictive left ventricular diastolic function.

  • 8.
    Droog, Eric
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Steenbergen, W
    Nederländerna.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi.
    Measurement of depth of burns by laser Doppler perfusion imaging2001In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 27, no 6, p. 561-568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Laser Doppler perfusion imaging (LDPI), is a further development in laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF). Its advantage is that it enables assessment of microvascular blood flow in a predefined skin area rather than, as for LDF, in one place. In many ways this method seems to be more promising than LDF in the assessment of burn wounds. However, several methodological issues that are inherent in the LDPI technique, and are relevant for the assessment of burn depth, must be clarified. These include the effect of scanning distance, curvature of the tissue, thickness of topical wound dressings, and pathophysiological effects of skin colour, blisters, and wound fluids. Furthermore, we soon realised that to examine the perfusion image generated by LDPI adequately the process of analysis was appreciably improved by the simultaneous use of digital photography. In the present investigation we used both in vitro and in vivo models and also examined burned patients, and found that the listed factors all significantly affected the LDPI output signal. However, if these factors are known to the examiner, most of them can be adjusted for. If the technique is further improved by minimizing such effects and by reducing the practical difficulties of applying it to a burned patient in the burns unit, the technique may find uses in everyday clinical decision-making.

  • 9.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Mirdell, Robin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Laser speckle contrast imaging in children with scalds: Its influence on timing of intervention, duration of healing and care, and costs2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 798-804Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [sv]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common type of burn injury in children, and the initial evaluation of burn depth is a problem. Early identification of deep dermal areas that need excision and grafting would save unnecessary visits and stays in hospital. Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) shows promise for the evaluation of this type of burn. The aim of this study was to find out whether perfusion measured with LSCI has an influence on the decision for operation, duration of healing and care period, and costs, in children with scalds.

    Methods

    We studied a group of children with scalds whose wounds were evaluated with LSCI on day 3–4 after injury during the period 2012–2015. Regression (adjustment for percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), age, and sex) was used to analyse the significance of associations between degree of perfusion and clinical outcome.

    Results

    We studied 33 children with a mean TBSA% of 6.0 (95% CI 4.4–7.7)%. Lower perfusion values were associated with operation (area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve 0.86, 95% CI 0.73–1.00). The perfusion cut-off with 100% specificity for not undergoing an operation was ≥191 PU units (66.7% sensitivity and 72.7% accurately classified). Multivariable analyses showed that perfusion was independently associated with duration of healing and care period.

    Conclusion

    Lower perfusion values, as measured with LSCI, are associated with longer healing time and longer care period. By earlier identification of burns that will be operated, perfusion measurements may further decrease the duration of care of burns in children with scalds.

  • 10.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Abdelrahman, Islam Mohamedy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Changes in patterns of treatment of burned children at the Linkoping Burn Centre, Sweden, 2009-20142017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 5, p. 1111-1119Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Children are a relatively large group among patients with burns in Sweden. We changed the management of childrens burns to a flexible, outpatient-based plan. The aim was to follow up the outpatient management for childrens burns during the period 20092014, and track it, to find out to what extent the patients had been treated flexibly as outpatients, and to clarify the reasons behind those who did not fit in the plan. Methods: Descriptive retrospective analysis dividing the patients into three groups: inpatients only, flexible management, and outpatients. Other variables recorded included: age, sex, percentage total body surface area burned (TBSA%), percentage full thickness burn (FTB%), cause of burn, county of residence, operations required, number of visits to the outpatient department, costs, and duration of overnight stay in the hospital. Results: The study group included 620 children: nine were managed strictly as inpatients, 204 as flexible outpatients, and 407 strictly as outpatients. Among the total there were 269 children who came from remote areas (43%), and of these 260 were treated as outpatients and flexible outpatients. Median TBSA% in the whole group was 1 (10th-90th centile 0-9) with the biggest median TBSA% 12 (5-38) in the inpatient group. The most common cause of injury was scalds (332/620,-54%). Costs/patient (US$) was lower in the flexible outpatient group than in the inpatient group (median 10 557 (3213-35802) and 35343 (7344-66554), respectively). Conclusion: Based on the results, we expect that the flexible outpatient treatment plan for children with minor to moderate burns can be expanded in the future. The results encourage us to continue the service and to further reduce duration of stay in hospital below the level already achieved (25% of the whole period of care). (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 11.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt .
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Letter: "Is the length of time in acute burn surgery associated with poorer outcomes?"2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 772-773Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 12.
    Fransen, Jian
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Huss, Fredrik R. M.
    Uppsala University, Sweden; University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden.
    Nilsson, Lennart E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Rydell, Ulf
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Hanberger, Håkan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Infectious Diseases.
    Surveillance of antibiotic susceptibility in a Swedish Burn Center 1994-20122016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 6, p. 1295-1303Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Patients with burn trauma are at risk for infections caused by antibiotic resistant bacteria (ABR) with subsequent increase in morbidity and mortality. As part of the Swedish strategic program against antibiotic resistance in intensive care (ICU-Strama), we have surveyed the distribution of species and ABR in isolates from patients admitted to a Swedish burn center at Linkoping University Hospital from 1994 through 2012. In an international comparison Strama has been successful in reducing the antibiotic consumption among animals and humans in primary care. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibiotic consumption pressure and resistance rates in a Swedish burn unit. Methods: Microbiology data, total body surface area (TBSA), patient days, and mortality were collected from a hospital database for all patients admitted to the Burn Center at the University Hospital of Linkoping from April 1994 through December 2012. Results: A total of 1570 patients were admitted with a mean annual admission rate of 83 patients (range: 57-152). 15,006 microbiology cultures (approximately 10 per patient) were collected during the study period and of these 4531 were positive (approximately 3 per patient). The annual mean total body surface area (TBSA) was 13.4% (range 9.5-18.5) with an annual mortality rate of 5.4% (range 1-8%). The MRSA incidence was 1.7% (15/866) which corresponds to an MRSA incidence of 0.34/1000 admission days (TAD). Corresponding figures were for Escherichia coli resistant to 3rd generation cephalosporins (ESBL phenotype) 8% (13/170) and 0.3/TAD, Klebsiella spp. ESBL phenotype 5% (6/134) and 0.14/TAD, carbapenem resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa 26% (56/209) and 1.28/TAD, and carbapenem resistant Acinetobacter spp. 3% (2/64) and 0.04/TAD. Conclusions: Our results show a sustained low risk for MRSA and high, although not increasing, risk for carbapenem resistant P. aeruginosa. (C) 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 13.
    Fredriksson, Camilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Transplantation of cultured human keratinocytes in single cell suspension: a comparative in vitro study of different application techniques2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 2, p. 212-219Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Transplantation of autologous cultured keratinocytes in single cell suspension is useful in the treatment of burns. The reduced time needed for culture, and the fact that keratinocytes in suspension can be transported from the laboratory to the patient in small vials, thus reducing the costs involved and be stored (frozen) in the clinic for transplantation when the wound surfaces are ready, makes it appealing. We found few published data in the literature about actual cell survival after transplantation of keratinocytes in single cell suspension and so did a comparative in vitro study, considering commonly used application techniques. Human primary keratinocytes were transplanted in vitro in a standard manner using different techniques. Keratinocytes were counted before and after transplantation, were subsequently allowed to proliferate, and counted again on days 4, 8, and 14 by vital staining. Cell survival varied, ranging from 47% to >90%, depending on the technique. However, the proliferation assays showed that the differences in numbers diminished after 8 days of culture. Our findings indicate that a great number of cells die during transplantation but that this effect is diminished if cells are allowed to proliferate in an optimal milieu. A burned patient’s wounds cannot be regarded as the optimal milieu, and using less harsh methods of transplantation may increase the take rate and wound closing properties of autologous keratinocytes transplanted in a single cell suspension.

  • 14.
    Frew, Quentin
    et al.
    Mid Essex Hosp Trust, England.
    Rennekampff, Hans-Oliver
    Rhein Maas Klinikum, Germany.
    Dziewulski, Peter
    Mid Essex Hosp Trust, England.
    Moiem, Naiem
    Univ Hosp Birmingham NHS Fdn Trust Queen Elisabet, England.
    Zahn, Tobias
    Birken AG, Germany; 3R Pharma Consulting GmbH, Germany.
    Hartmann, Bernd
    Unfallkrankenhaus Berlin, Germany.
    Siemers, Frank
    BG Kliniken Bergmannstrost, Germany.
    Mailander, Peter
    Univ Lubeck, Germany.
    Lehnhardt, Marcus
    BG Univ Klin Bergmannsheil, Germany.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Univ Hosp Uppsala, Sweden.
    Pietramaggiori, Sandra Scherer
    CHU Vaudois, Switzerland.
    Dheansa, Baljit
    Queen Victoria Hosp NHS, England.
    Metelmann, Hans-Robert
    Univ Med Greifswald, Germany.
    Schumann, Hauke
    Kathol Hsch Freiburg, Germany.
    Betulin wound gel accelerated healing of superficial partial thickness burns: Results of a randomized, intra-individually controlled, phase III trial with 12-months follow-up2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 4, p. 876-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Acceleration of wound healing promises advantages for patients and caregivers in reducing the burden of disease, avoiding complications such as wound infections, and improving the long-term outcome. However, medicines that can accelerate wound healing are lacking. The objective of this open, blindly evaluated, randomized, multicenter phase III study was to compare intra-individually the efficacy and tolerability of Oleogel-S10 with fatty gauze dressing versus Octenilin (R) wound gel with fatty gauze dressing in accelerating the healing of superficial partial thickness burn wounds. Methods: Acute superficial partial thickness burn wounds in adults caused by fire, heat burn or scalding were divided into 2 halves and randomly assigned to treatment with Oleogel-S10 or Octenilin (R) wound gel. Photos for observer-blinded analysis of wound healing were taken at each wound dressing change. Percentages of reepithelialization were assessed at defined intervals. Efficacy and tolerability were evaluated based on a 5-point Likert scale. Results: Of 61 patients that were enrolled, 57 received the allocated intervention and 48 completed treatment. The percentage of patients with earlier wound healing was significantly higher for Oleogel-S10 (85.7%, n=30) compared to Octenilin (R) wound gel (14.3%, n= 5, p amp;lt;0.0001). The mean intra-individual difference in time to wound closure was -1.0 day in favour of Oleogel-S10 (-1.4, -0.6; 95% CI, p amp;lt;0.0001). Most investigators (87.0%) and patients (84.8%) evaluated the efficacy of Oleogel-S10 to be better or much better than that of Octenilin (R) wound gel. Long-term outcome 3 months and 12 months post injury was improved in some patients. Conclusions: Oleogel-S10 (Episalvan) significantly accelerated the healing of superficial partial thickness burn wounds. It was safe and well tolerated. (C) 2018 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 15.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    et al.
    Uppsala University Hospital.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Professor Gösta Arturson (1927–2013): Obituary2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 8, p. 1654-1655Article in journal (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 16.
    Grossmann, Benjamin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Nilsson, Andreas
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Nilsson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Rectal ketamine during paediatric burn wound dressing procedures: a randomised dose-finding study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 5, p. 1081-1088Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Worldwide, ketamine is used during paediatric procedures, but no recommendations are available regarding a suitable dose for rectal administration during procedures involving high levels of pain and/or anxiety such as burn wound dressing change.

    Methods

    We evaluated three different single doses of rectally administered racemic ketamine mixed with a fixed dose of 0.5 mg/kg of midazolam. In total, 90 children – aged 6 months to 4 years – were randomised 1:1:1 to receive 4 mg/kg (K-4 group), 6 mg/kg (K-6 group) or 8 mg/kg (K-8 group) of racemic ketamine for a maximum of three consecutive procedures. Primary outcome measure was procedural pain evaluated by Face, Legs, Activity, Cry, Consolability (FLACC) behavioural scale. Secondary outcome included feasibility and recovery time. Patient safety was evaluated using surrogate outcomes.

    Results

    In total, 201 procedures in 90 children aged 19 ± 8 months were completed. The median maximum pain was FLACC 0 in all groups (p = 0.141). The feasibility was better for groups K-6 (p = 0.049) and K-8 (p = 0.027) compared with K-4, and the mean recovery time was the longest for group K-8 (36 ± 22 min) compared with groups K-4 (25 ± 15 min; p = 0.003) and K-6 (27 ± 20 min; p = 0.025). Median maximum sedation measured by the University of Michigan Sedation Scale (UMSS) was higher in group K-8 compared with group K-4 (p < 0.0001) and K-6 (p = 0.023). One child in group K-8 had a study drug-related serious adverse event — laryngospasm/airway obstruction. No rescue analgosedative medication was administered for group K-6.

    Conclusions

    A rectally administered mixture of racemic ketamine (6 mg/kg) and midazolam (0.5 mg/kg) during paediatric burn dressing procedures with a duration of approximately 30 min provides optimal conditions regarding pain relief, feasibility, recovery time and patient safety, with no need for rescue analgosedative medication.

  • 17. Gustafson, Carl-Johan
    et al.
    Birgisson, Agust
    Junker, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Salemark, Lars
    Johnson, Hans
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Employing human keratinocytes cultured on macroporous gelatin spheres to treat full thickness-wounds: An in vivo study on athymic rats2007In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 33, no 6, p. 726-735Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Providing cutaneous wounds with sufficient epidermis to prevent infections and fluid loss is one of the most challenging tasks associated with surgical treatment of burns. Recently, application of cultured keratinocytes in this context has allowed this challenge to be met without several of the limitations connected with the use of split-thickness skin grafts. The continuous development of this novel approach has now revealed that transplantation of cultured autologous keratinocytes as single-cell suspensions exhibits several advantages over the use of cultured epidermal grafts. However, a number of methodological problems remain to be solved, primarily with regards to the complexity of culturing these cells, loss of viability and other negative effects during their preparation and transportation, the relatively long period of time required following transplantation to obtain a sufficiently protective epidermis. In the present investigation we attempted to eliminate these limitations by culturing the keratinocytes on macroporous gelatin spheres. Accordingly, the efficacies of normal human keratinocytes in single-cell suspension or growing on macroporous gelatin spheres, as well as of split-thickness skin grafts in healing wounds on athymic rats were compared. Human keratinocytes were found to adhere and proliferate efficiently both on the surface and within the pores of such spheres. Transplantation of such cells adherent to the spheres resulted in significantly more rapid formation of a stratified epidermis than did transplantation of single-cell suspensions or spheres alone. Twenty-three days after transplantation, the epidermis formed from the cells bound to the spheres was not as thick as the epidermis on wounds covered with split-thickness skin grafts, but significantly thicker than on wounds to which single-cell suspensions, spheres alone or no transplant at all was applied. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridisation revealed that the transplanted keratinocytes, both those adherent to gelatin spheres and those in single-cell suspension, were components of the newly formed epidermis. These findings indicate that application of biodegradable macroporous spheres may prove to be of considerable value in designing cell-based therapies for the treatment of acute and persistent wounds. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 18.
    Johansson, Joakim
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bäckryd, Emmanuel
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Rehabilitation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Granerus, Göran
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Clinical Physiology UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Urinary excretion of histamine and methylhistamine after burns2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 1005-1009Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: The increased vascular permeability seen after burn contribute to morbidity and mortality as it interferes with organ function and the healing process. Large efforts have been made to explore underlying pathophysiological mechanisms that generate increased vascular permeability after burns. Many different substances have been proposed as mediators of which histamine, serotonin and oxygen radicals are claimed most important. However, no specific blocker has convincingly been shown to be clinically effective. Early work has claimed increased histamine plasma-concentrations in humans after burn and data from animal models pointed at histamine as an important mediator. Modern human clinical studies investigating the role of histamine as a mediator of the generalized post burn increase in vascular permeability are lacking. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: We examined histamine turnover by measuring the urinary excretion of histamine and methyl histamine for 48 h after burns in 8 patients (mean total burn surface area 24%). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Over time, in this time frame and compared to healthy controls we found a small increase in the excretion of histamine, but no increase of its metabolite methylhistamine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: Our findings do not support that histamine is an important mediator of the increased systemic vascular permeability seen after burn.

  • 19.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal Univ, Egypt.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Olofsson, Pia
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Superiority of silver-foam over porcine xenograft dressings for treatment of scalds in children: A prospective randomised controlled trial2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1401-1409Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim: Our aim was to compare two different regimens for the treatment of children with partial-thickness scalds. These were treated with either a porcine xenograft (EZderm (R), Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden) or a silver-foam dressing (Mepilex (R) Ag, Molnlycke Health Care, Gothenburg, Sweden). Methods: We organised a prospective randomised clinical trial that included 58 children admitted between May 2015 and May 2018 with partial-thickness scalds to The Burn Centre in Linkoping, Sweden. The primary outcome was time to healing. Secondary outcomes were pain, need for operation, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, changes of dressings, and time taken. Results: The patients treated with silver-foam dressing had a significantly shorter healing time. The median time to 97% healing for this group was 9 (7-23) days compared to 15 (9-29) days in the porcine xenograft group (p = 0.004). The median time to complete healing for the silver-foam group was 15 (9-29) days and for the porcine xenograft group 20.5 (11-42) days (p = 0.010). Pain, wound infection, duration of hospital stay, and the proportion of operations were similar between the groups. Number of dressing changes and time for dressing changes were lower in the silver-foam dressing group (p = 0.03 for both variables). Conclusions: We compared two different treatments for children with partial-thickness scalds, and the data indicate that wound healing was faster, fewer dressing changes were needed, and dressing times were shorter in the silver-foam group. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 20. Liffner, G
    et al.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Reske, A
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Inhalation injury assessed by score does not contribute to the development of acute respiratory distress syndrome in burn victims2005In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 263-268Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To establish the incidence, mortality, and time of onset of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in relation to extent of burn and inhalation injury in patients who required mechanical ventilation. Design: Data about burn and inhalation injury were recorded prospectively whereas ARDS and multiple organ dysfunction were assessed by review of patient charts. Setting: National burn intensive care unit at Linköping University Hospital, Sweden (a tertiary referral hospital). Patients: Between 1993 and 1999, we studied all patients with thermal injury (n = 553) who required mechanical ventilation for more than two days (n = 91). Measurements and results: Out of the thirty-six burn victims who developed ARDS (40%), 25 (70%) did so early post burn (in less than 6 days). Patients with ARDS had higher multiple organ dysfunction scores (mean 10.5) than those who did not develop ARDS (mean 5.6) (p < 0.01). The probable presence of inhalation injury as assessed by an inhalation lung injury score (ILIS) did not contribute to the development of ARDS. Mortality tended to be higher in patients who developed ARDS (14%) compared to those who did not (6%, p = 0.2). Conclusions: In our burn patients the incidence of ARDS was high whereas mortality was low. We found no association between inhalation injury as assessed using the ILIS and development of ARDS. Our data support a multi-factorial origin of ARDS in burn victims as a part of a multiple organ failure event. © 2004 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 21.
    Lindahl, Filip
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Assessing paediatric scald injuries using Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 662-666Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    The use of objective methods for assessment of burns is limited. Laser Speckle Contrast Imaging (LSCI) is a non-invasive technique for instant measurement of tissue perfusion, making it potentially valuable for early prediction of burn wound outcome.

    Aim

    To evaluate the influence of technical factors on perfusion and to measure perfusion in burns 0–14 days post-burn and compare this with the outcome of the burn wound at 14 days after burn.

    Method

    The effect of room light, camera distance and camera angle was studied using a suspension of polystyrene particles. LSCI measurements were performed on 45 scald burns and 32 uninjured areas 0–14 days after burn.

    Result

    Technical factors had no clinically relevant effect on measured perfusion. Burns that healed within 14 days had a higher perfusion during the first week post-burn than burns that healed after 14 days or underwent surgery. The difference in perfusion was largest 4–7 days after burn.

    Conclusion

    LSCI allows for robust, instant measurement of burns and can easily be applied in a clinical setting. Differences in perfusion during the first week post-burn are related to the outcome after 14 days.

  • 22.
    Lindahl, Olof Anton
    et al.
    Department of Biomedical Engineering, Umeå University Hospital and Linköping University, Sweden.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ängquist, Karl-Axel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Human postburn oedema measured with the impression method1993In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 19, no 6, p. 479-489Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The course of tissue swelling in human non-injured skin after burn injury was investigated with a non-invasive impression method that measures force and tissue fluid translocation during mechanical compression of the skin. Time-dependent changes in the fluid translocation and the interstitial-pressure related to impression force were measured on 11 occasions, during 3 weeks, in seven patients postburn. A mathematical model was fitted to the impression force curves and the parameters of the model depicted the time-dependent compartmental fluid shift in the postburn generalized oedema. Tissue fluid translocation increased significantly (P < 0.05) up to a maximum value after 6 days postburn and declined thereafter. This indicated a continuous increase in the generalized postburn oedema for the first 6 days postburn. Impression force at 3 weeks postburn was significantly lower (P < 0.001) as compared with the half-day postburn value, indicating an increased tissue pressure during the first days postburn. Parameter analysis indicated a flux of water-like fluid from the vasculature to the interstitial space during the first 6 days postburn. The spread of the values registered between different measurement sites was, however, large.

  • 23.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Diagnostics, Medical radiation physics. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences.
    Accuracy of laser speckle contrast imaging in the assessment of pediatric scald wounds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 1, p. 90-98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Changes in microvascular perfusion in scalds in children during the first four days, measured with laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI), are related to the time to healing and need for surgical intervention. The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy (sensitivity and specificity) of LSCI on different days after injury in the prediction of healing outcome and if the accuracy can be improved by combining an early and a late measurement. Also, the accuracy of LSCI was compared with that of clinical assessment. Methods: Perfusion was measured between 0-24h and between 72-96h using LSCI in 45 children with scalds. On the same occasions, burn surgeons assessed the burns as healing amp;lt; 14days or healing amp;gt; 14days/surgery. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were constructed for the early and late measurement and for the double measurement (DM) using two different methods. Results: Sensitivity and specificity were 92.3% (95% CI: 64.0-99.8%) and 78.3% (95% CI: 69.985.3%) between 0-24h, 100% (95% CI: 84.6-100%) and 90.4% (95% CI: 83.8-94.9%) between 72-96h, and was 100% (95% CI: 59.0-100%) and 100% (95% CI: 95.1-100%) when combining the two measurements into a modified perfusion trend. Clinical assessment had an accuracy of 67%, Cohens k=0.23. Conclusion: The perfusion in scalds between 72-96h after injury, as measured using LSCI, is highly predictive of healing outcome in scalds when measured. The predictive value can be further improved by incorporating an early perfusion measurement within 24h after injury. (C) 2017 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 24.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Interobserver reliability of laser speckle contrast imaging in the assessment of burns2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1325-1335Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) is an emerging technique for the assessment of burns in humans and interobserver differences have not been studied. The aim of this study was to compare assessments of perfusion images by different professional groups regarding (i) perfusion values and (ii) burn depth assessment. Methods: Twelve observers without LSCI experience were included. The observers were evenly recruited from three professional groups: plastic surgeons with experience in assessing burns, nurses with experience in treating burns, and junior doctors with limited experience of burns. Ten cases were included. Each case consisted of one digital photo of the burn with a pre-marked region of interest (ROI) and two unmarked perfusion images of the same area. The first and the second perfusion image was from 24h and 72-96h after injury, respectively. The perfusion values from both perfusion images were used to generate a LSCI recommendation based on the perfusion trend (the derivative between the two perfusion values). As a last step, each observer was asked to estimate the burn depth using their clinical experience and all available information. Intraclass correlation (ICC) was calculated between the different professional groups and among all observers. Results: Perfusion values and perfusion trends between all observers had an ICC of 0.96 (95% CI 0.91-0.99). Burn depth assessment by all observers yielded an ICC of 0.53 (95% CI: 0.31-0.80) and an accuracy of 0.53 (weighted kappa). LSCI recommendations generated by all observers had an ICC of 0.95 (95% CI: 0.90-0.99). Conclusion: Observers can reliably identify the same ROI, which results in observer-independent perfusion measurements, irrespective of burn experience. Extensive burn experience did not further improve burn depth assessment. The LSCI recommendation was more accurate in all professional groups. Introducing LSCI measurements would be likely improve early assessment of burns. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 25.
    Mirdell, Robin
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Iredahl, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Microvascular blood flow in scalds in children and its relation to duration of wound healing: A study using laser speckle contrast imaging2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 648-654Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Microvascular perfusion changes in scalds in children during the first weeks after injury is related to the outcome of healing, and measurements of perfusion, based on laser Doppler imaging, have been used successfully to predict the need for excision and grafting. However, the day-to-day changes in perfusion during the first weeks after injury have not to our knowledge been studied in detail. The aim of this study, based on a conservative treatment model where excision and grafting decisions were delayed to day 14 after injury, was to measure changes in perfusion in scalds using laser speckle contrast imaging (LSCI) during the first three weeks after injury. Methods: We measured perfusion with LSCI in 34 patients at regular intervals between 6 h after injury until complete reepithelialization or surgery. Duration of healing was defined as the time to complete reepithelialization. Results: Less perfusion, between 6 and 96 h after injury, was associated with longer duration of healing with the strongest association occurring between 72 and 96 h. Burns that healed within 14 days had relatively high initial perfusion, followed by a peak and subsequent slow decrease. Both the maximum perfusion and the time-to-peak were dependent on the severity of the burn. Burns that needed excision and grafting had less initial perfusion and a gradual reduction over time. Conclusion: The perfusion in scalds in children shows characteristic patterns during the first weeks after injury depending on the duration of wound healing, the greatest difference between wounds of different severity being on the 4th day. Perfusion should therefore preferably be measured on the fourth day if it is to be used in the assessment of burn depth. (c) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 26.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Orwelius, Lotti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Ekselius, Lisa
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden.
    Gerdin, Bengt
    Uppsala Univ, Sweden; Uppsala Burn Ctr, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping (ANOPIVA).
    Anxiety and depression after burn, not as bad as we think-A nationwide study2019In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 45, no 6, p. 1367-1374Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: A history of psychiatric disorders is more common among patients who have had burns than in the general population. To try and find out the scale of the problem we have assessed self-reported symptoms of anxiety and depression after a burn. Methods: Consecutive patients with burns measuring more than 10% total body surface area or duration of stay in hospital of seven days or more were included. Personal and clinical details about the patients were extracted from the database at each center. Data were collected from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, as well as Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL; Short Form-36, SF-36) and questionnaires about socioeconomic factors. All results were obtained 12 and 24 months after the burn, and compared with those from a reference group. Results: A total of 156 patients responded to the questionnaires. Mean (SD) age and TBSA (%) were 46 (16.4) years and 23.6 (19.2) %, respectively. There were no differences in incidence between the burn and reference groups in anxiety or depression either 12 or 24 months after the burn. Those who reported higher anxiety and depression scores also had consistently poorer HRQoL as assessed by the SF-36. Conclusion: Seen as a group, people who have had burns report anxiety and depression the same range as a reference group. Some patients, however, express more anxiety and depression, and concomitantly poorer HRQoL. These patients should be identified, and offered additional support. (C) 2019 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 27.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery.
    Letter: Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation. Are studies always adequately powered and analyzed? Response2010In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 36, no 6, p. 948-950Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 28.
    Nilsson, Andreas
    et al.
    Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care Liköping University hospital.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Patient controlled sedation using a standard protocol for dressing changes in burns: Patients' preference, procedural details and a preliminary safety evaluation2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 7, p. 929-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Patient controlled sedation (PCS) enables patients to titrate doses of drugs by themselves during different procedures involving pain or discomfort. Methods: We studied it in a prospective crossover design using a fixed protocol without lockout time to examine it as an alternative method of sedation for changing dressings in burned patients. Eleven patients with >10% total burn surface area (TBSA) had their dressings changed, starting with sedation by an anaesthetist (ACS). The second dressing change was done with PCS (propofol/alfentanil) and the third time the patients had to choose ACS or PCS. During the procedures, data on cardiopulmonary variables, sedation (bispectral index), pain intensity (VAS), procedural details, doses of drugs, and patients' preferences were collected to compare the two sedation techniques. Results: The study data indicated that wound care in burned patients is feasible with a standardized PCS protocol. The patients preferred PCS to ACS on the basis of self-control, and because they had less discomfort during the recovery period. Wound care was also considered adequate by the staff during PCS. No respiratory (respiratory rate/transcutaneous PCO2) or cardiovascular (heart rate/blood pressure) adverse events were recorded at any time during any of the PCS procedures. The doses of propofol and alfentanil and BIS index decrease were less during PCS than ACS. Procedural pain was higher during PCS but lower after the procedure. Conclusion: We suggest that PCS using a standard protocol is an interesting alternative to anaesthetist-provided sedation during dressing changes. It seems effective, saves resources, is safe, and at same time is preferred by the patients. The strength of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small size of this investigation and therefore further studies are warranted. © 2008 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 29.
    Nilsson, Heléne
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jonson, Carl-Oscar
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Vikström, Tore
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bengtsson, Eva
    Region Östergötland, Center for Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Disaster Medicine and Traumatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Huss, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Kildal, Morten
    Department of Plastic and Maxillofacial Surgery, Akademiska Sjukhuset, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Simulation-assisted burn disaster planning2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 6, p. 1122-1130Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the Swedish medical systems response to a mass casualty burn incident in a rural area with a focus on national coordination of burn care. Data were collected from two simulations of a mass casualty incident with burns in a rural area in the mid portion of Sweden close to the Norwegian border, based on a large inventory of emergency resources available in this area as well as regional hospitals, university hospitals and burn centres in Sweden and abroad. The simulation system Emergo Train System (R) (ETS) was used and risk for preventable death and complications were used as outcome measures: simulation I, 18.5% (n = 13) preventable deaths and 15.5% (n = 11) preventable complications; simulation II, 11.4% (n = 8) preventable deaths and 11.4% (n = 8) preventable complications. The last T1 patient was evacuated after 7 h in simulation I, compared with 5 h in simulation II. Better national coordination of burn care and more timely distribution based on the experience from the first simulation, and possibly a learning effect, led to a better patient outcome in simulation II. The experience using a system that combines both process and outcome indicators can create important results that may support disaster planning.

  • 30.
    Orwelius, Lotti
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Nursing Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Willebrand, M
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Gerdin, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Ekselius, L
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Long term health-related quality of life after burns is strongly dependent on pre-existing disease and psychosocial issues and less due to the burn itself2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 229-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) is reduced after a burn, and is affected by coexisting conditions. The aims of the investigation were to examine and describe effects of coexisting disease on HRQoL, and to quantify the proportion of burned people whose HRQoL was below that of a reference group matched for age, gender, and coexisting conditions.

    Method

    A nationwide study covering 9 years and examined HRQoL 12 and 24 months after the burn with the SF-36 questionnaire. The reference group was from the referral area of one of the hospitals.

    Results

    The HRQoL of the burned patients was below that of the reference group mainly in the mental dimensions, and only single patients were affected in the physical dimensions. The factor that significantly affected most HRQoL dimensions (n = 6) after the burn was unemployment, whereas only smaller effects could be attributed directly to the burn.

    Conclusion

    Poor HRQoL was recorded for only a small number of patients, and the decline were mostly in the mental dimensions when compared with a group adjusted for age, gender, and coexisting conditions. Factors other than the burn itself, such as mainly unemployment and pre-existing disease, were most important for the long term HRQoL experience in these patients.

  • 31.
    Othman, Nasih
    et al.
    Sulaimani Polytech University, Iraq.
    Kendrick, Denise
    University of Nottingham, England.
    Al-Windi, Ahmad
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Childhood burns in Sulaimaniyah province, Iraqi Kurdistan: A prospective study of admissions and outpatients2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 2, p. 394-400Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: While it is globally observed that young children are at a higher risk of burn injuries, little is known about childhood burns in Iraqi Kurdistan. This study was undertaken to describe the epidemiology of burns amongst pre-school children in this region. Methods: A prospective study was undertaken from November 2007 to November 2008 involving all children aged 0-5 years attending the burns centre in Sulaimaniyah province for a new burn injury whether treated as an outpatient or admitted to hospital. Results: 1,122 children attended the bums centre of whom 944 (84%) were interviewed (male 53%, female 47%). Mean age was 1.9 years with children aged 1 year comprising 32% and those aged 2 years comprising 21% of the sample. The incidence of bums was 1044/100,000 person-years (1030 in females and 1057 in males). Mechanisms of injury included scalds (80%), contact burns (12%) flames (6%) and other mechanisms (2%). Almost 97% of burns occurred at home including 43% in the kitchen. Winter was the commonest season (36%) followed by autumn (24%). There were 3 peak times of injury during the day corresponding to meal times. The majority of bums were caused by hot water (44%) and tea (20%) and the most common equipment/products responsible were tea utensils (41%). There were 237 admissions with an admission rate of 95 per 100,000 person-years. Scald injuries accounted for most admissions (84%). Median total body surface area affected by the burn or scald (TBSA) was 11% and median hospital stay was 7 days. In-hospital mortality was 8%. Mortality rate was 4% when TBSA was less than= 25%, and 100% when TBSA was over 50%. Conclusion: Burn incidence is high in young children especially those aged 1-2 years. Preventive interventions targeted at families with young children and focusing on home safety measures could be effective in reducing childhood burns.

  • 32. Parment, Karin
    et al.
    Zetterberg, Anna
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Clinical Immunology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Bakteman, Karin
    Steinwall, Ingrid
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Long-term immunosuppression in burned patients assessed by in vitro neutrophil oxidative burst (Phagoburst®)2007In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 33, no 7, p. 865-871Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: To assess the duration and magnitude of immunosuppression induced by burns as measured by the neutrophil oxidative burst in vitro. Design: Prospective exploratory cohort study. Setting: Tertiary referral unit, University Hospital, Linkoping, Sweden (National Burn Unit). Patients and healthy volunteers (controls): Twenty-eight subjects consecutively admitted to the Burn Unit. The mean total burn surface area (TBSA%) was 36 (range 13-87) and mean age 44 years (range 14-89). Patients' data were collected prospectively in the burn unit, which also included sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score. Interventions: None. Measurements and results: To assess the changes in the oxidative capacity of neutrophils after the burn, blood samples for the Phagoburst® analysis were taken on admission and at least once every second week for the duration of stay in hospital and thereafter monthly up to 12 months after the burn. Neutrophils were stimulated in vitro by Escherichia coli, phorbol 12-phorbol myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and peptide N-formyl-Met-Leu-Phe (fMLP). Oxidative burst was measured by flow cytometry. Oxidative capacity of the neutrophils decreased similarly for all three stimulants: there was a pathological decrease shortly after admission, with the lowest value occurring between days 7 and 10, followed by a gradual recovery during the ensuing months. Full recovery (to the values of the controls) was seen first 3.5 months after the burn. Using multiple regression, we found that only age and time since the burn significantly (p < 0.05) affected the oxidative burst. White cell count (WCC) and C-reactive protein (CRP) values returned to reference ranges long before the oxidative burst. Conclusions: This study provides evidence that immunosuppression in those injured by burns, as assessed by the in vitro oxidative burst of neutrophils, remains long after the event of the burn (up to 3.5 months after burn). Absence of correlations to TBSA%, FTB%, blood transfusion, opiates provided, and multiple organ failure score and laboratory infection variables together with the finding that decreased oxidative burst was uniform after the injury, suggesting that this immunosuppression is primarily due to the general metabolic response rather than recurring infections. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 33.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. The Plastic Surgery Unit, Surgery Department, Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: a national exploratory study2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, no 2, p. 280-287Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: The Baux score - the sum of age and total body surface area burned (TBSA %) - is a good predictor of mortality has a high specificity but low sensitivity. Our aim was to examine the causes of death in patients who die with Baux scores of <100, which may explain the lower sensitivity and possibly affect the prediction of mortality.

    METHODS: All patients admitted to our centre for burn care from 1993 to 2015 (n=1946) were included in this retrospective, descriptive, exploratory study. The study group comprised those patients who died with Baux scores of <100 (n=23), and their medical charts were examined for the cause of death and for coexisting diseases.

    RESULTS: Crude mortality was 5% (93/1946) for the overall cohort, and a quarter of the patients who died (23/93) had Baux scores of less than 100 (range 64-99). In this latter group, flame burns were the most common (18/23), the median (10th-90th centile) age was 70 (46-86) years and for TBSA 21 (5.0-40.5) %, of which 7 (0-27.0) % of the area was full thickness. The main causes of death in 17 of the 23 were classified as "other than burn", being cerebral disease (n=9), cardiovascular disease (n=6), and respiratory failure (n=2). Among the remaining six (burn-related) deaths, multiple organ failure (predominantly renal failure) was responsible. When we excluded the cases in which the cause of death was not related to the burn, the Baux mortality prediction value improved (receiver operating characteristics area under the curve, AUC) from 0.9733 (95% CI 0.9633-0.9834) to 0.9888 (95% CI 0.9839-0.9936) and the sensitivity estimate increased from 45.2% to 53.9%.

    CONCLUSION: Patients with burns who died with a Baux score <100 were a quarter of all the patients who died. An important finding is that most of these deaths were caused by reasons other than the burn, usually cerebrovascular disease. This may be the explanation why the sensitivity of the Baux score is low, as factors other than age and TBSA % explain the fatal outcome.

  • 34.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Response to comments on: Burned patients who die from causes other than the burn affect the model used to predict mortality: A national exploratory study2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 8, p. 1827-1827Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 35.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Inclusion of coexisting morbidity in a TBSA% and age based model for the prediction of mortality after burns does not increase its predictive power2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 8, p. 1868-1876Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Several models for predicting mortality have been developed for patients with burns, and the most commonly used are based on age and total body surface area (TBSA%). They often show good predictive precision as depicted by high values for area under the receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC). However the effect of coexisting morbidity on such prediction models has not to our knowledge been thoroughly examined. We hypothesised that adding it to a previously published model (based on age, TBSA%, full thickness burns, gender, and need for mechanical ventilation) would further improve its predictive power. Methods: We studied 772 patients admitted during the period 1997-2008 to the Linkoping University Hospital, National Burn Centre with any type of burns. We defined coexisting morbidity as any of the medical conditions listed in the Charlson list, as well as psychiatric disorders or drug or alcohol misuse. We added coexisting medical conditions to the model for predicting mortality (age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation) to determine whether it improved the model as assessed by changes in deviances between the models. Results: Mean (SD) age and TBSA% was 35 (26) years and 13 (17) %, respectively. Among 725 patients who survived, 105 (14%) had one or more coexisting condition, compared with 28 (60%) among those 47 who died. The presence of coexisting conditions increased with age (p &lt; 0.001) among patients with burns. The AUC of the mortality prediction model in this study, based on the variables age, TBSA%, and need for mechanical ventilation was 0.980 (n = 772); after inclusion of coexisting morbidity in the model, the AUC improved only marginally, to 0.986. The model was not significantly better either. Conclusion: Adding coexisting morbidity to a model for prediction of mortality after a burn based on age, TBSA%, and the need for mechanical ventilation did not significantly improve its predictive value. This is probably because coexisting morbidity is automatically adjusted for by age in the original model. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 36.
    Pompermaier, Laura
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Thorfinn, Johan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology.
    Long-term survival after burns in a Swedish population2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 1, p. 157-161Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: As widely reported, the progress in burn care during recent decades has reduced the hospital mortality. The effect of the burns on long-term outcome has not received so much attention, and more study is indicated. The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate the long-time survival among patients who had been treated for burns.

    METHODS: We studied 1487 patients who were discharged alive from the Linköping University Hospital Burn Centre during the period 1993 until the end of December 2012. We used Cox's regression analysis to study the effect of burns on long-term survival after adjustment for different factors.

    RESULTS: Age and a full-thickness burn were significantly associated with mortality after discharge (p<0.001), whereas percentage of total body surface area burned (TBSA %), need for mechanical ventilation, and gender were not. Less than 1% of the patients with burns (13/1487) died within 30 days of discharge and a total of 176/1487 (12%) died during follow-up.

    CONCLUSION: Age and full-thickness burns reduce the long-time survival after discharge from the Burn Centre, whereas the effect of TBSA% and need for artificial ventilation ends with discharge.

  • 37.
    Rakar, Jonathan
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Krammer, Markus P.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Kratz, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Human melanocytes mitigate keratinocyte-dependent contraction in an in vitro collagen contraction assay2015In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 41, no 5, p. 1035-1042Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Scarring is an extensive problem in burn care, and treatment can be especially complicated in cases of hypertrophic scarring. Contraction is an important factor in scarring but the contribution of different cell types remains unclear. We have investigated the contractile behavior of keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts by using an in vitro collagen gel assay aimed at identifying a modulating role of melanocytes in keratinocyte-mediated contraction. Cells were seeded on a collagen type I gel substrate and the change in gel dimensions were measured over time. Hematoxylin and Eosin-staining and immunohistochemistry against pan-cytokeratin and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor showed that melanocytes integrated between keratinocytes and remained there throughout the experiments. Keratinocyte- and fibroblast-seeded gels contracted significantly over time, whereas melanocyte-seeded gels did not. Co-culture assays showed that melanocytes mitigate the keratinocyte-dependent contraction (significantly slower and 18-32% less). Fibroblasts augmented the contraction in most assays (approximately 6% more). Non-contact co-cultures showed some influence on the keratinocyte-dependent contraction. Results show that mechanisms attributable to melanocytes, but not fibroblasts, can mitigate keratinocyte contractile behavior. Contact-dependent mechanisms are stronger modulators than non-contact dependent mechanisms, but both modes carry significance to the contraction modulation of keratinocytes. Further investigations are required to determine the mechanisms involved and to determine the utility of melanocytes beyond hypopigmentation in improved clinical regimes of burn wounds and wound healing.

  • 38.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthesiology and Surgical Centre, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Abdiu, Avni
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Wackenfors, Angelica
    Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery Linköpings Universitet.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Serotonin kinetics in patients with burn injuries: A comparison between the local and systemic responses measured by microdialysis-A pilot study2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 5, p. 617-622Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: To investigate serotonin (5HT) locally in burned and uninjured skin (intracutaneous) by microdialysis, and simultaneously record urinary and blood values in the same subjects. For comparison, serotonin values were also measured in skin of healthy controls. Design and setting: An experimental study in burned patients with of more than 25% TBSA (total burn surface area) % in an 8-bed tertiary burns unit, serving about 3.5 million persons. Patients and methods: Six subjects with a median TBSA% of 59% (range 33.5-90), and five healthy controls were examined by intracutaneous microdialysis of the skin. Results: 5HT was increased in burned patients, compared with controls. This increase was tenfold in skin and was noted both in uninjured and burned skin. The highest values were recorded on day 1 (median 16.1 nmol in uninjured and 9.5 nmol in burned skin) and day 2 (15.6 nmol in uninjured and 13.4 nmol in burned skin). A rapid reduction was noted on day 3 (4.9 nmol in uninjured and 3.8 nmol in burned skin). The corresponding value for control subjects was 1.3 nmol. The 5HT in blood was twice normal on day 2, and gradually reduced on days 3 and 4 (3189, 3035 and 2573 nmol, respectively). Urinary 5HT concentrations were increased only on day 2 at 1755 nmol and thereafter returned to the normal range on days 3 and 4 (1248 and 1344 nmol, respectively). Conclusions: We showed that microdialysis may be used in the critical care of burns, and local skin serotonin concentrations examined continuously for several days. The findings of significantly raised tissue serotonin concentrations, compared to that in blood and urine, suggests that serotonin may be important in local vascular control and formation of oedema. © 2007 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 39.
    Samuelsson, Anders
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Farnebo, Simon
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Magnusson, Beatrice
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Anderson, Chris
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Dermatology and Venerology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Tesselaar, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Zettersten, Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Implications for burn shock resuscitation of a new in vivo human vascular microdosing technique (microdialysis) for dermal administration of noradrenaline2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 7, p. 975-983Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Skin has a large dynamic capacity for alterations in blood flow, and is therefore often used for recruitment of blood during states of hypoperfusion such as during burn shock resuscitation. However, little is known about the blood flow and metabolic consequences seen in the dermis secondary to the use vasoactive drugs (i.e. noradrenaline) for circulatory support. The aims of this study were therefore: to develop an in vivo, human microdosing model based on dermal microdialysis; and in this model to investigate effects on blood flow and metabolism by local application of noradrenaline and nitroglycerin by the microdialysis system simulating drug induced circulatory support. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod: Nine healthy volunteers had microdialysis catheters placed intradermally in the volar surface of the lower arm. The catheters were perfused with noradrenaline 3 or 30 mmol/L and after an equilibrium period all catheters were perfused with nitroglycerine (2.2 mmol/L). Dermal blood flow was measured by the urea clearance technique and by laser Doppler imaging. Simultaneously changes in dermal glucose, lactate, and pyruvate concentrations were recorded. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: Noradrenaline and nitroglycerine delivered to the dermis by the microdialysis probes induced large time- and dose-dependent changes in all variables. We particularly noted that tissue glucose concentrations responded rapidly to hypoperfusion but remained higher than zero. Furthermore, vasoconstriction remained after the noradrenaline administration implicating vasospasm and an attenuated dermal autoregulatory capacity. The changes in glucose and lactate by vasoconstriction (noradrenaline) remained until vasodilatation was actively induced by nitroglycerine. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion: These findings, i.e., compromised dermal blood flow and metabolism are particularly interesting from the burn shock resuscitation perspective where noradrenaline is commonly used for circulatory support. The importance and clinical value of the results obtained in this in vivo dermal model in healthy volunteers needs to be further explored in burn-injured patients.

  • 40.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, Anestesi. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Danielsson, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Andersson, L
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Steinwall, I
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Zdolsek, Joachim
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Anaesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery and Burns.
    Östrup, Leif
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery.
    Monafo, W
    Department of Surgery, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA.
    Utility of an intervention scoring system in documenting effects of changes in burn treatment2000In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 26, no 6, p. 553-559Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The consequences of the introduction of a program of consistent use of topical antimicrobials and early aggressive excision of deep burn wounds by utilizing a comprehensive, computerized patient registry/therapeutic intervention scoring system, were investigated. Prospectively, the clinical course, mortality, outcome and hospital costs were compared for the year preceding (89 patients) and the 4 years following (226 patients) the introduction of the new treatment program. It was found that mortality decreased from 10.1 to 4.6% after change in therapy (P < 0.001), despite an increase in mean burn extent. The length of hospital stay per % burn surface area declined from 1.2 to 1.0 days (P < 0.001). The number and complexity of therapeutic interventions and the associated costs, also declined. Patients in the new treatment program had a better level of physical and psychosocial function at follow up. In conclusion, the introduction of a program of consistent use of topical antimicrobials and early, aggressive surgical excision was associated with an improved outcome at lesser cost. The combined registry-intervention scoring system permits ready analysis of results using data entered on a daily, near-real time basis.

  • 41.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Unit . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Reconstruction Centre, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL.
    Acute respiratory distress syndrome is as important as inhalation injury for the development of respiratory dysfunction in major burns2008In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 34, no 4, p. 441-451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Respiratory dysfunction is common after major burns. The pathogenesis is, however, still under debate. The aim was to classify and examine underlying reasons for respiratory dysfunction after major burns. Consecutive adult patients (n = 16) with a total burned body surface area of 20% or more who required mechanical ventilation were assessed for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), inhalation injury, sepsis, ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP), ventilator-induced lung injury (VILI), using conventional criteria, together with measurements of cardiovascular variables and viscoelastic properties of the lung including extravascular lung water.

    Nine patients developed ARDS within 6 days of injury. ARDS was characterized by a large reduction in the PEEP-adjusted PaO2:FiO2 ratio, pulmonary compliance, and increased extra vascular lung water together with increased renal dysfunction rates. Seven patients fulfilled the criteria for inhalation injury. They also had decreased PaO2:FiO2 ratios. There was an increase in extra vascular lung water and a decrease in compliance measures though not to the same extent as in the ARDS group. White blood cell counts dropped from (mean) 21.4 x 10exp9 /l (95% CI 15.3-27.5) in day 1 to 4.3 x 10exp9 /l (2.2-6.5) on day 3, and lower values tended to correlate with the development of ARDS. Sepsis occurred before onset of ARDS in only three cases. One patient fulfilled the criteria for VAP, but none was thought to have VILI.

    We found that respiratory dysfunction after burns is multifactorial, and ARDS and inhalation injury are most important. The early onset of ARDS, together with the changes in white blood cell count and organ dysfunction, favours a syndrome in which respiratory distress is induced by an inflammatory process mediated by the effect of the burn rather than being secondary to sepsis. The power of these conclusions is, however, hampered by the small number of patients in this study.    

  • 42.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Neuro and Inflammation Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Standardised mortality ratio based on the sum of age and percentage total body surface area burned is an adequate quality indicator in burn care: An exploratory review2016In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 42, no 1, p. 28-40Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Standardised Mortality Ratio (SMR) based on generic mortality predicting models is an established quality indicator in critical care. Burn-specific mortality models are preferred for the comparison among patients with burns as their predictive value is better. The aim was to assess whether the sum of age (years) and percentage total body surface area burned (which constitutes the Baux score) is acceptable in comparison to other more complex models, and to find out if data collected from a separate burn centre are sufficient for SMR based quality assessment. The predictive value of nine burn-specific models was tested by comparing values from the area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC) and a non-inferiority analysis using 1% as the limit (delta). SMR was analysed by comparing data from seven reference sources, including the North American National Burn Repository (NBR), with the observed mortality (years 1993-2012, n = 1613, 80 deaths). The AUC values ranged between 0.934 and 0.976. The AUC 0.970 (95% CI 0.96-0.98) for the Baux score was non-inferior to the other models. SMR was 0.52 (95% CI 0.28-0.88) for the most recent five-year period compared with NBR based data. The analysis suggests that SMR based on the Baux score is eligible as an indicator of quality for setting standards of mortality in burn care. More advanced modelling only marginally improves the predictive value. The SMR can detect mortality differences in data from a single centre. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  • 43.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Plastic Surgery, Hand Surgery and Burns.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bak, Zoltan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Anesthesiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Intensive Care UHL.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Incidence of early burn-induced effects on liver functionas reflected by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green: a prospective descriptive cohort study2012In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 38, no 2, p. 214-224Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Organ dysfunction and failure are important for burned patients as they increase morbidity and mortality. Recent evidence has suggested that organ injuries are occurring earlier after burns, and are more common, than previously thought. In this study we have assessed the extent to which liver function, assessed by the plasma disappearance rate of indocyanine green (PDRICG), is affected in patients with severe burns. This is a prospective, descriptive exploratory study at a national burn centre. Consecutive adult patients with a total burned body surface area (TBSA%) of 20% or more, were examined prospectively by dynamic (PDRICG) and static liver function tests (plasma: bilirubin concentration, prothrombin complex, and alanine aminotransferase and alkaline phosphatase activities). Early liver dysfunction was common, as assessed by both dynamic (7 of 17) and static liver function tests (6-17 of 17). A regression model showed that changes in PDRICG were associated with age, TBSA%, plasma bilirubin concentration, plasma C-reactive protein concentration, and cardiac index. Persistent and advanced hepatic dysfunction was associated with mortality. The PDRICG seems to give a comprehensive assessment of liver function after major burns. Hepatic dysfunction seems to be as common as dysfunction in other organs. We interpret the recorded effects on liver function as part of a multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, primarily induced by the burn itself. However, this needs to be further investigated.

  • 44.
    Steinvall, Ingrid
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Karlsson, Matilda
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Elmasry, Moustafa
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Suez Canal University, Ismailia, Egypt.
    C-reactive protein response patterns after antibiotic treatment among children with scalds2018In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 44, p. 718-723Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background

    Scalds are the most common cause of burns in children, yet there is little information available about the inflammatory response. The aim of the study was to investigate the response to treatment with antibiotics among scalded children by following the C-reactive protein (CRP) concentration, procalcitonin (PCT) concentration, and white blood cell count (WCC) during the first two weeks after injury.

    Methods

    All children with scalds who presented to the Burn Centre during 2010–2016 were included in this retrospective study. All measurements of CRP, PCT, and WCC from the first 14 days after injury were recorded, and each patient’s maximum values during days 0–2, 3–7, and 8–14 were used for calculations. Multivariable regression for panel data was used to study the inflammatory response after antibiotic treatment.

    Results

    A total of 216 children were included. C-reactive protein was 45 mg/L (p < 0.001) higher in the group treated with antibiotics, and decreased with 8.8 mg/L per day over the studied time in this group, which was more than twice as fast as among the children who were not given antibiotics.

    Conclusion

    The CRP response, among children with minor scalds treated with antibiotics, shows an appreciable rise during the first week of injury that subsided rapidly during the second week.

  • 45.
    Sveen, J.
    et al.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Oster, C.
    University of Uppsala Hospital, Sweden .
    Letter: Response to Letter to the Editor: Sleep quality implicates in life quality: An analysis about children who suffered burns.2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 4, p. 775-776Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 46.
    Sveen, J
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Öster, C
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Health-related quality of life in Swedish pediatric burn patients and associations with burn and family characteristics2014In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 40, no 5, p. 987-994Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Although many children with burns recover well and have a satisfying quality of life after the burn, some children do not adjust as well. Health-related quality of life (HRQoL) focuses on the impact health status has on quality of life. The aim of this study was to assess HRQoL with the American Burn Association/Shriners Hospitals for Children Burn Outcomes Questionnaire (BOQ) in a nationwide Swedish sample of children with burns 0.3-9.0 years after injury. Participants were parents (n=109) of children aged up to 18 years at the time of investigation who were treated at the Linköping or Uppsala Burn Center between 2000 and 2008. The majority of children did not have limitations in physical function and they did not seem to experience much pain. However, there were indications of psychosocial problems. Parents of preschool children reported most problems with the children's behavior and family disruption, whereas parents of children aged 5-18 years reported most problems with appearance and emotional health. There were mainly burn-related variables associated with suboptimal HRQoL in children aged 5-18 years, while family-related variables did not contribute as much.

  • 47.
    Sveen, Josefin
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Buhrman, Bo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Internet-based information and support program for parents of children with burns: A randomized controlled trial.2017In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 43, no 3, p. 583-591Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: The aim of the study was to evaluate the feasibility and effects of an internet-based information and self-help program with therapist contact for parents of children and adolescents with burns. The program aimed to reduce parents' symptoms of general and posttraumatic stress.

    METHODS: Participants were parents of children treated for burns between 2009-2013 at either of the two specialized Swedish Burn centers. Sixty-two parents were included in a two-armed, randomized controlled trial with a six-week intervention group and a wait-list control group, including a pre and post-assessment, as well as a 3 and 12-month follow-up. The intervention contained psychoeducation, exercises and homework assignments, and the intervention group received weekly written feedback from a therapist. The main outcome was stress (post-traumatic stress, general stress and parental stress).

    RESULTS: The program had a beneficial effect on posttraumatic stress in the short term, but did not affect general stress or parental stress. The parents rated the program as being informative and meaningful, but some of them thought it was time-consuming.

    CONCLUSION: The program has the potential to support parents of children with burns. The intervention is easily accessible, cost-effective and could be implemented in burn care rehabilitation.

  • 48.
    Tokarik, Monika
    et al.
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Hand and Plastic Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Vajtr, David
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Broz, Ludomir
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Balik, Martin
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Vranova, Jana
    Charles University of Prague, Czech Republic .
    Natriuretic peptide proANP (1-98), a biomarker of ALI/ARDS in burns2013In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 39, no 2, p. 243-248Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Introduction: Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels (proANP (1-98)), a parameter of myocardial dysfunction, have been reported to be increased in critically ill patients with acute lung injury/acute respiratory distress syndrome (ALI/ARDS). The aim of the study was to examine if proANP is a biomarker of ALI/ARDS as assessed by the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment score (SOFA Lung andgt;= 2) in burn patients, and how it compares to the corresponding values for age, total body surface area percent (TBSA%) and inhalation injury for mortality prediction. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods: A group of 22 burn patients with a mean TBSA of 30% (10-75%) and a mean age of 52 years (25-84 years) was investigated during 2010. Organ dysfunction/failure was classified according to the SOFA score. The criteria for ALI/ARDS were based on SOFA Lung andgt;= 2. ProANP (1-98) concentrations (nmol l(-1)) were measured by commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunoassays (Biomedica Austria) on post-bum days 2 and 7. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults: ProANP levels on day 7 post-bum positively correlated with a SOFA score day 7 post-burn, c = 0.91. The receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis proved a sensitivity of 75% and a specificity of 75% for ALI/ARDS at cut-off values andgt; 3.35 nmol l(-1). The ROC value of proANP for ALI/ARDS (SOFA Lung andgt;= 2) was significantly larger than that of age, TBSA% and inhalation injury: 0.90, 0.71, 0.74, and 0.69 (p andlt; 0.001). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusions: ProANP levels, as a biomarker of ALI/ARDS, in critically burn patients correlated with SOFA scoring. The inhalation injury did not lead to increase in proANP values.

  • 49.
    Willebrand, M.
    et al.
    Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden, Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology.
    Kildal, M.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Gerdin, B.
    Department of Surgical Sciences, Plastic Surgery, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Ekselius, L.
    Department of Neuroscience, Psychiatry, Uppsala University Hospital, SE-751 85 Uppsala, Sweden.
    Injury-related fear-avoidance, neuroticism and burn-specific health2006In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 32, no 4, p. 408-415Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Dysfunctional beliefs such as fear-avoidance (i.e. fear of re-injury) and personality traits such as neuroticism are risk factors for poor health. However, there is little information regarding associations with poor perceived health after severe burn and what level of fear-avoidance is associated with poor health. In this study, we investigated fear-avoidance and neuroticism regarding their associations with post-burn health. Participants were 86 recovered burn patients and data were collected by a postal survey. Post-burn health was assessed with the nine subscales of the Burn Specific Health Scale-Brief (BSHS-B). In logistic regressions, fear-avoidance was related to poorer health in six subscales assessing both physical and psychosocial problems. Neuroticism was associated with poorer health in three subscales assessing mainly psychosocial problems. Chi-square analyses showed that participants with a moderate or high level of fear-avoidance =1.0 (out of 4) were more likely to describe their health as poor and had a longer sick leave than those with a fear-avoidance level of <1.0. In summary, fear-avoidance was associated with poorer health even at moderate levels and was associated with several aspects of post-burn health. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI.

  • 50.
    Willebrand, Mimmie
    et al.
    Uppsala University.
    Sveen, Josefin
    Uppsala University.
    Ramklint, M.D. Mia
    Uppsala University.
    Bergquist, R.N. Maria
    University of Uppsala Hospital.
    Huss, M.D. Fredrik
    Uppsala University.
    Sjöberg, Folke
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Burn Center. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Plastic Surgery, Hand surgery UHL. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Sinnescentrum, Department of Anaesthesiology and Surgery UHL.
    Psychological problems in children with burns-Parents reports on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire2011In: Burns, ISSN 0305-4179, E-ISSN 1879-1409, Vol. 37, no 8, p. 1309-1316Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Burns may have a devastating effect on psychological health among children, although previous studies report difficulties as well as positive findings. The aims were to describe the rate of psychological problems in children with burns using a standardised instrument and to explore statistical predictors of these problems. Parents (n = 94) of children aged 3-18 years who sustained burns 0.3-9.0 years previously answered the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ) covering Emotional symptoms, Conduct problems, Hyperactivity/Inattention, Peer relationship problems, Prosocial behaviour, and a Total difficulties score. Questions regarding parental psychological health and family situation were also included. The results for three of the SDQ subscales were close to the norm (10%) regarding the rate of cases where clinical problems were indicated, while the rate of cases indicated for Conduct, Peer problems and Total difficulties was 18-20%. Statistical predictors of the SDQ subscales were mainly parents psychological symptoms, fathers education, and changes in living arrangements. Visible scars were relevant for the Total difficulties score and Hyperactivity/Inattention. In summary, a slightly larger proportion of children with burns had psychological problems than is the case among children in general, and family variables exerted the most influence on parental reports of childrens psychological problems.

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