liu.seSearch for publications in DiVA
Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1.
    Andersson, Eva
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology.
    Rosdahl, Inger
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    Törmä, Hans
    Vahlquist, Anders
    Differential effects of UV irradiation on nuclear retinoid receptor levels in cultured keratinocytes and melanocytes2003In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 12, no 5, p. 563-571Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major risk factor for skin cancer is UV irradiation, which not only damages DNA and other photosensitive compounds like vitamin A, but may also perturb cellular signaling, e.g. via the retinoid receptor system believed to be important for cancer protection. We used cultured normal human keratinocytes and melanocytes to examine the effects of UV irradiation on the expression of the predominant retinoid receptors in the human skin (RARa, RAR? and RXRa) and the AP-1 protein c-Jun, mRNA levels were studied by real-time PCR and protein levels by Western blot. In keratinocytes, a single dose of UVB (50 mJ/cm2) caused a rapid drop in the expression of all three receptors (mRNA levels minus 35-50% after 4h, protein levels minus 20-45% after 8h), which was followed over the next 40 h by a variable response, leading to full normalization for RARa only. In contrast, the levels of c-Jun did not change significantly after UV exposure. In melanocytes, UVB caused a similar drop of the retinoid receptor levels as in keratinocytes but this was soon followed by an increased expression leading to a complete normalization of all receptor levels within 1-3 days. The c-Jun levels in melanocytes increased 1 day after UV exposure and remained high (plus 50%) thereafter. In both cell types, a ~3-fold increase in apoptosis (measured by DNA fragmentation) was observed 8-48 h after UVB irradiation. In conclusion, a depletion of vitamin A and retinoid receptors by UV irradiation, together with unchanged or even increased c-Jun levels, might seriously interfere with retinoid signaling and thus promote future tumor development, especially in keratinocytes. ⌐ Blackwell Munksgaard, 2003.

  • 2.
    Carlström, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ekman, Anna-Karin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petersson, Stina
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enerbäck, Charlotta
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Genetic support for the role of the NLRP3 inflammasome in psoriasis susceptibility2012In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 21, no 12, p. 932-937Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    NACHT leucine-rich repeat- and PYD-containing (NLRP)3 protein controls the inflammasome by regulating caspase-1 activity and interleukin (IL)-1 beta processing. The contribution of IL-1 beta in the pathogenesis of psoriasis is well recognized. Polymorphisms in NLRP3 and caspase recruitment domaincontaining protein (CARD)8, a negative regulator of caspase-1 activity, have been associated with susceptibility to common inflammatory diseases, such as Crohns disease and rheumatoid arthritis. To investigate the role for genetic variants in the NLRP3 inflammasome in psoriasis susceptibility. In a patient sample comprising 1988 individuals from 491 families and 1002 healthy controls, genotypes for four selected single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in NLRP3 (three SNPs) and CARD8 (one SNP) were determined by TaqMan (R) Allelic Discrimination. Using the transmission disequilibrium test (TDT), a significant increase in the transmission of the NLRP3 rs10733113G genotype to a subgroup of patients with more widespread psoriasis was demonstrated (P = 0.015). Using logistic regression analysis in 741 patients with psoriasis and 1002 controls, the CARD8 rs2043211 genotype was significantly different in cases and controls in overall terms [OR 1.3 (1.11.5), P = 0.004] and for both genders. Our data support the hypothesis that the inflammasome plays a role in psoriasis susceptibility.

  • 3.
    Duvetorp, Albert
    et al.
    Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Slind Olsen, Renate
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Nyström, Helena
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Skarstedt, Marita
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Dienus, Olaf
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Mrowietz, Ulrich
    University of Medical Centre Schleswig Holstein, Germany.
    Soederman, Jan
    Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Seifert, Oliver
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Expression of low-density lipoprotein-related receptors 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) in psoriasis skin2017In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 26, no 11, p. 1033-1038Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Low-density lipoprotein-related receptors 5 and 6 (LRP5/6) are transmembrane receptors with key functions in canonical Wnt signalling. Wnt ligands are thought to play an important role in innate immunity and psoriasis, and recent studies assigned LRP5/6 anti-inflammatory properties. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of LRP5 and LRP6 in lesional and non-lesional skin in peripheral blood and in mononuclear cells of patients with chronic plaque type psoriasis compared with control individuals. To investigate the effect of UV-B radiation, LRP5/6 skin gene expression was analysed before and after narrowband UV-B treatment. Our results showed significantly decreased gene expression of LRP5 and LRP6 in lesional skin and in peripheral blood from patients with psoriasis compared with non-lesional skin and healthy control skin. Immunohistochemistry did not reveal differences in protein expression of LRP5/6. Narrowband UV-B treatment induced a significant increase in LRP5 and LRP6 gene expression in lesional skin. Decreased gene expression of LRP5/6 in lesional skin and upregulation after nb UV-B treatment suggest a possible role for LRP5/6 in psoriasis.

  • 4. Thomsen, JS
    et al.
    Simonsen, L
    Benfeldt, E
    Jensen, SB
    Serup, Jörgen
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Dermatology and Venerology in Östergötland.
    The effect of topically applied salicylic compounds on serotonin-induced scratching behaviour in hairless rats2002In: Experimental dermatology, ISSN 0906-6705, E-ISSN 1600-0625, Vol. 11, no 4, p. 370-375Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is a strong need for antipruritic substances for treating itch in clinical dermatology. In one recent human study, topically applied acetylsalicylic acid has been described to rapidly decrease histamine-induced itch. We have established a model for periferally elicited pruritus by injecting serotonin into the rostral back area (neck) in rats. Using this model, we aimed to investigate the antipruritic potential of four different salicylic compounds, which all possess different skin penetration characteristics. Eighteen rats were studied for 6 weeks. Prior to serotonin injections (2mg/ml, 50 ╡l), 10 ╡l of test substances was applied to a circular area 18 mm in diameter. The four substances were salicylic acid, butyl salicylate, diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide, all solubilized in dimethyl isosorbide to a concentration of 5% w/w. Diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide were previously shown to be slowly absorbed through rat skin in contrast to salicylic acid and butyl salicylate. After serotonin injections, scratching was monitored by video recording for 1.5h. Compared with the vehicle, a lower number of scratch sequences were seen when diethylamine salicylate (P< 0.001) and salicylamide (P = 0.005) had been applied. The numbers of scratch sequences were lower with diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide than with the vehicle throughout the 1.5-h study period. We conclude that topical application of diethylamine salicylate and salicylamide could suppress serotonin-induced scratching in rats. The antipruritic effect seems to be related to the slow drug release of the two substances. The results may be clinically relevant as serotonin induces itch in humans.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • oxford
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf