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  • 1.
    Bodegard, J
    et al.
    AstraZeneca AB, Sweden .
    Sundstrom, J
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Svennblad, B
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in Finspång, Primary Health Care in Finspång.
    Nilsson, P M.
    Lund University, Sweden .
    Johansson, G
    Uppsala University, Sweden .
    Changes in body mass index following newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and risk of cardiovascular mortality: A cohort study of 8486 primary-care patients2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 306-313Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims. - Elevated body mass index (BMI) is associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This study explored the association between BMI changes in the first 18 months of newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and the risk of long-term CVD mortality. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethods. - A total of 8486 patients with newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes and no previous history of CVD or cancer were identified from 84 primary-care centres in Sweden. During the first year after diagnosis, patients were grouped according to BMI change: Increase, or andgt;= +1 BMI unit; unchanged, or between +1 and-1 BMI unit; and decrease, or andlt;=-1 BMI unit. Associations between BMI change and CVD mortality, defined as death from stroke, myocardial infarction or sudden death, were estimated using adjusted Cox proportional hazards models (NCT 01121315). less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults. - Baseline mean age was 60.0 years and mean BMI was 30.2 kg/m(2). Patients were followed for up to 9 years (median: 4.6 years). During the first 18 months, 53.4% had no change in their BMI, while 32.2% decreased and 14.4% increased. Compared with patients with unchanged BMI, those with an increased BMI had higher risks of CVD mortality (hazard ratio: 1.63, 95% CI: 1.11-2.39) and all-cause mortality (1.33, 1.01-1.76). BMI decreases had no association with these risks compared with unchanged BMI: 1.06 (0.76-1.48) and 1.06 (0.85-1.33), respectively. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion. - Increased BMI within the first 18 months of type 2 diabetes diagnosis was associated with an increased long-term risk of CVD mortality. However, BMI decrease did not lower the long-term risk of mortality.

  • 2.
    Carlsson, Axel Carl
    et al.
    Division of Family Medicine, Department of Neurobiology, Care Sciences and Society, Karolinska Institutet, Huddinge, Sweden; Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, "Primary Health Care in Motala".
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Larsson, Anders
    Department of Medical Sciences, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Ärnlöv, Johan
    Department of Medical Sciences, Cardiovascular Epidemiology, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden; School of Health and Social Studies, Dalarna University, Falun, Sweden.
    The association between endostatin and kidney disease and mortality in patients with type 2 diabetes2016In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 42, no 5, p. 351-357Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: Circulating endostatin, a biologically active derivate of collagen XVIII, is considered to be a marker of kidney disease and a risk factor for its related mortality. However, less is known of the role of endostatin in diabetes and the development of diabetic nephropathy. For this reason, our study investigated the associations between circulating endostatin and the prevalence and progression of kidney disease, and its mortality risk in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D).

    METHODS: This was a cohort study of 607 patients with T2D (mean age: 61 years, 44% women). Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), calculated using the Chronic Kidney Disease Epidemiology Collaboration (CKD-EPI) creatinine equation, was used to assess the patients' kidney function decline and mortality.

    RESULTS: Of the total study cohort, 20 patients declined by ≥20% in eGFR over 4 years, and 44 died during the follow-up (mean duration: 6.7 years). At baseline, participants with diabetic nephropathy (defined as eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) and/or microalbuminuria [defined as a urinary albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR)>3g/mol] had higher median levels of endostatin than those without nephropathy (62.7μg/L vs 57.4μg/L, respectively; P=0.031). In longitudinal analyses adjusted for age, gender, baseline eGFR and ACR, higher endostatin levels were associated with a higher risk of decline (≥20% in eGFR, OR per 1 SD increase: 1.73, 95% CI: 1.13-2.65) and a higher risk of mortality (HR per 1 SD increase: 1.57, 95% CI: 1.19-2.07).

    CONCLUSION: In patients with T2D, circulating endostatin levels can predict the progression of kidney disease and mortality independently of established kidney disease markers. The clinical usefulness of endostatin as a risk marker in such patients merits further studies.

  • 3.
    Dahlén, Elsa M
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Clinchy, Birgitta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Ernerudh, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Inflammation Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Clinical Immunology and Transfusion Medicine.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, West County Primary Health Care.
    Abdominal Obesity and low grade Systemic Inflammation as Markers for Subclinical Organ Damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 76-81Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this study was to explore associations between abdominal obesity, inflammatory markers, and subclinical organ damage in 740 patients with type 2 diabetes. Waist circumference (WC) and sagittal abdominal diameter (SAD) was measured. Blood samples were analyzed for; C-reactive protein (CRP), interleukin (IL) -1β and IL-6. Carotid intimamedia thickness (IMT) was evaluated by ultrasonography. Aortic pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured with applanation tonometry.

    Abdominal obesity were significantly correlated with; IL-6, CRP (both p= <0.001, WC and SAD, respectively), IMT (WC p=0.012, SAD p=0.003) and PWV (p<0.001, for WC and SAD, respectively). In multiple linear regressions with IMT as dependent variable and age, sex, statins, systolic blood pressure (SBP), Body Mass Index (BMI), CRP and HbA1c, as independent variables, SAD (p=0.047) but not WC, remained associated with IMT. In stepwise linear regression, entering both SAD and WC, the association between SAD and PWV was stronger than the association between WC and PWV.

    We conclude that SAD and WC are feasible measures of obesity that provides information on inflammation, atherosclerosis and arterial stiffness in type 2 diabetes. However, SAD was slightly more robustly associated to subclinical organ damage, compared with WC.

  • 4.
    Mohamed, A F
    et al.
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Zhang, J
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Johnson, F R
    RTI Health Solutions, Research Triangle Park, NC, USA.
    Lomon, I Duprat
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Malvolti, E
    Bristol-Myers Squibb, Rueil-Malmaison, France.
    Townsend, R
    AstraZeneca UK Limited, London, United Kingdom.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Parhofer, K G
    Klinikum der Universität München, Germany.
    Avoidance of weight gain is important for oral type 2 diabetes treatments in Sweden and Germany: patient preferences2013In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 39, no 5, p. 397-403Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aims

    The aim of the study was to quantify patient preferences for outcomes associated with oral antidiabetic medications (OAMs) in Sweden and Germany through a discrete-choice experiment.

    Methods

    Adults taking OAMs who had a self-reported physician's diagnosis of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) made a series of nine choices between pairs of hypothetical profiles. Each profile had a predefined range of attributes: blood glucose control, frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia, annual severe hypoglycaemic events, annual weight gain, pill burden and frequency of administration, and cost. Choice questions were based on an experimental design with known statistical properties. Bivariate probit analysis estimated the probabilities of choice of medication administration from patient characteristics and, conditional on that choice, preferences for treatment outcomes.

    Results

    The final sample consisted of 188 Swedish and 195 German patients. For both countries, weight gain was the most important attribute, followed by blood glucose control. Avoiding a 5-kg weight gain was 1.5 times more important in Sweden and 2.3 times more important in Germany than achieving moderate blood glucose control, thereby, suggesting that blood glucose control is relatively more important to Swedish than to German patients. Least important outcomes were the number of daily pills (Sweden) and frequency of mild-to-moderate hypoglycaemia (Germany).

    Conclusion

    Patients in both Sweden and Germany preferred OAMs not associated with weight gain.

  • 5.
    Petersson, Ulla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Brudin, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Clinical Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Brismar, K.
    Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Solna, Sweden.
    Nilsson, P. M.
    Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund University, University Hospital, Malmö, Sweden.
    Low levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are prospectively associated with the incidence of type 2 diabetes and impaired glucose tolerance (IGT): The Söderåkra Cardiovascular Risk Factor Study2009In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 35, no 3, p. 198-205Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: To explore the association between baseline levels of insulin-like growth-factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), a marker of insulin sensitivity, and the development of type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT) in a specifically defined middle-aged population.

    METHODS: This cross-sectional population-based screening study was conducted in 1989-1990 and included baseline data for 664 non-diabetic subjects aged 40-59 years. Clinical data were collected and blood samples analyzed for blood glucose, serum lipids and insulin. Blood specimens were frozen at baseline and later analyzed for IGF-I, IGFBP-1 and C-reactive protein (CRP). At the follow-up in 2006, the incidence of type 2 diabetes and IGT was reported based on primary-care medical records.

    RESULTS: During the 17-year observation period, 42 subjects (6.3%) developed type 2 diabetes/IGT. Those in the lowest quintile of IGFBP-1 (/=59mug/L), the incidence was 1.5%. Cox's proportional-hazards model regression analyses were used to determine the incidence of type 2 diabetes/IGT, corrected for age and gender, in relation to IGFBP-1, CRP and waist circumference. Subjects in the lowest IGFBP-1 quintile showed an independently increased risk of type 2 diabetes/IGT [hazards ratio (HR): 3.54; 95% CI 1.18-10.6; P=0.024]. For CRP and waist circumference, the corresponding figures were HR: 6.81; 95% CI 2.50-18.6; P<0.001 and HR: 3.33; 95% CI 1.47-7.6; P=0.004, respectively.

    CONCLUSION: Low levels of IGFBP-1 predicted the long-term development of type 2 diabetes or IGT in a middle-aged population. The association was independent of CRP and abdominal obesity.

  • 6.
    Sjöblom, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Engvall, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Clinical Physiology in Linköping.
    Östgren, Carl Johan
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Community Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in West Östergötland, Primary Health Care in Motala.
    Microalbuminuria, but not reduced eGFR, is associated with cardiovascular subclinical organ damage in type 2 diabetes2014In: Diabetes & Metabolism, ISSN 1262-3636, E-ISSN 1878-1780, Vol. 40, no 1, p. 49-55Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AIM: This study explored the association between reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) and microalbuminuria vs. subclinical organ damage in patients with type 2 diabetes.

    METHODS: Data from middle-aged patients with type 2 diabetes (n=706) treated in primary care were analyzed for microalbuminura, defined as a urinary albumin/creatinine ratio (uACR)≥3.0mmol/mol, and reduced eGFR, defined as<60mL/min/1.73m(2), in relation to blood pressure, pulse wave velocity (PWV), left ventricular mass index (LVMI), and carotid intima-media thickness (IMT) and lumen diameter (LD).

    RESULTS: Patients with microalbuminuria had significantly higher 24-h ambulatory systolic blood pressure (ASBP) compared with subjects with uACR<3mg/mmol: 137 vs. 128mmHg (P<0.001). There were no differences in ASBP in patients with eGFR<60mL/min/1.73m(2). However, patients with vs. without microalbuminuria had increased PWV (11.4 vs. 10.1m/s; P<0.001), LVMI (134.4 vs. 118.6g/m(2); P<0.001), LD (7.01±0.93 vs. 6.46±0.74mm; P<0.001) and IMT (0.78 vs. 0.74mm; P=0.047), respectively. The associations between uACR vs. PWV and LVMI were more robust after adjusting for age, diabetes duration, ASBP, HbA1c, LDL-cholesterol, and antihypertensive and lipid-lowering therapy compared with uACR vs. IMT. There were no statistically significant differences in PWV, LVMI or IMT between patients with reduced (<60mL/min/1.73m(2)) vs. normal eGFR.

    CONCLUSION: Levels of urinary albumin excretion, but not reduced eGFR, were associated with increased arterial stiffness, left ventricular mass and atherosclerosis in patients with type 2 diabetes.

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