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  • 1.
    Erlingsson, Styrbjörn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Herard, Sebastian
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Radiation Physics. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Lindström, Torbjörn
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Länne, Toste
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Physiology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart Centre, Department of Thoracic and Vascular Surgery.
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology.
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Men develop more intraabdominal obesity and signs of the metabolic syndrome after hyperalimentation than women2009In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 58, no 7, p. 995-1001Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We prospectively studied the effects of fast food-based hyperalimentation on insulin sensitivity and components of the metabolic syndrome and analyzed this with respect to sex. Twelve nonobese men and 6 nonobese women (26 +/- 6.6 years old), and an age-matched control group were recruited. Subjects in the intervention group aimed for 5% to 15% weight increase by doubling their regular caloric intake based on at least 2 fast food meals a day while also adopting a sedentary lifestyle for 4 weeks (andlt;5000 steps a day). Weight of Subjects in the intervention group increased from 67.6 +/- 9.1 to 74.0 +/- 11 kg (P andlt;.001), with no sex difference with regard to this or with respect to changes of total abdominal fat volumes or waist circumferences. Fasting insulin (men: before, 3.8 +/- 1.7 mu U/mL, after, 7.4 +/- 3.1 mu U/mL; P=.004; women: before, 4.9 +/- 2.3 mu U/mL; after, 5.9 +/- 2.8 mu U/mL; P =.17), systolic blood pressure (men: before, 117 +/- 13 mm Hg; after, 127 +/- 9.1 mm Hg; P =.002; women: before, 102 +/- 5.1 mm Hg; after, 98 +/- 5.4 mm Hg; P =.39), serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and apolipoprotein B increased only in the men of the intervention group. The sex differences in the metabolic responses to the intervention were linked to a considerable difference in the fat accumulation pattern; 41.4% +/- 9.2% of the increase of the fat volume in the abdominal region was accumulated intraabdominally in men and 22.7 +/- 6.5% in women (P andlt;.0001). This Study thus showed that women are protected, compared with men, against developing intraabdominal obesity when adopting a standardized obesity-provoking lifestyle. Our findings suggest that it is not different lifestyles and/or behaviors that underlie the fact that men have a higher cardiovascular risk at the same level of percentage of body fat than women.

  • 2.
    Fryk, Emanuel
    et al.
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Perman Sundelin, Jeanna
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Strindberg, Lena
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Pereira, Maria J.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Federici, Massimo
    University of Roma Tor Vergata, Italy.
    Marx, Nikolaus
    University Hospital RWTH Aachen, Germany.
    Nyström, Fredrik H
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    Schmelz, Martin
    Heidelberg University, Germany.
    Svensson, Per-Arne
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Eriksson, Jan W.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Boren, Jan
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Jansson, Per-Anders
    University of Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Microdialysis and proteomics of subcutaneous interstitial fluid reveals increased galectin-1 in type 2 diabetes patients2016In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 65, no 7, p. 998-1006Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To identify a potential therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes by comparing the subcutaneous interstitial fluid from type 2 diabetes patients and healthy men. Methods. Proteomics was performed on the interstitial fluid of subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained by microdialysis from 7 type 2 diabetes patients and 8 healthy participants. 851 proteins were detected, of which 36 (including galectin-1) showed significantly altered expression in type 2 diabetes. We also measured galectin-1 expression in: (1) adipocytes isolated from adipose tissue biopsies from these participants; (2) subcutaneous adipose tissue of 24 obese participants before, during and after 16 weeks on a very low calorie diet (VLCD); and (3) adipocytes isolated from 6 healthy young participants after 4 weeks on a diet and lifestyle intervention to promote weight gain. We also determined the effect of galectin-1 on glucose uptake in human adipose tissue. Results. Galectin-1 protein levels were elevated in subcutaneous dialysates from type 2 diabetes compared with healthy controls (p amp;lt; 0.05). In agreement, galectin-1 mRNA expression was increased in adipocytes from the type 2 diabetes patients (p amp;lt; 0.05). Furthermore, galectin-1 mRNA expression was decreased in adipose tissue after VLCD (p amp;lt; 0.05) and increased by overfeeding (p amp;lt; 0.05). Co-incubation of isolated human adipocytes with galectin-1 reduced glucose uptake (p amp;lt; 0.05) but this was independent of the insulin signal. Conclusion. Proteomics of the interstitial fluid in subcutaneous adipose tissue in vivo identified a novel adipokine, galectin-1, with a potential role in the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. (C) 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  • 3.
    Romu, Thobias
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, Faculty of Science & Engineering. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Camilla, Vavruch
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlqvist Leinhard, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Radiation Physics.
    Tallberg, Joakim
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Dahlström, Nils
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Persson, Anders
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Radiological Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV). Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Diagnostics, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Heglind, Mikael
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Lidell, Martin
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Enerbäck, Sven
    University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden..
    Borga, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedical Engineering, Medical Informatics. Linköping University, The Institute of Technology. Linköping University, Center for Medical Image Science and Visualization (CMIV).
    Nyström, Fredrik
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Cardiovascular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Center, Department of Endocrinology.
    A randomized trial of cold-exposure on energy expenditure and supraclavicular brown adipose tissue volume in humans2016In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 65, no 6, p. 926-934Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    To study if repeated cold-exposure increases metabolic rate and/or brown adipose tissue (BAT) volume in humans when compared with avoiding to freeze.

    Design

    Randomized, open, parallel-group trial.

    Methods

    Healthy non-selected participants were randomized to achieve cold-exposure 1 hour/day, or to avoid any sense of feeling cold, for 6 weeks. Metabolic rate (MR) was measured by indirect calorimetry before and after acute cold-exposure with cold vests and ingestion of cold water. The BAT volumes in the supraclavicular region were measured with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

    Results

    Twenty-eight participants were recruited, 12 were allocated to controls and 16 to cold-exposure. Two participants in the cold group dropped out and one was excluded. Both the non-stimulated and the cold-stimulated MR were lowered within the group randomized to avoid cold (MR at room temperature from 1841 ± 199 kCal/24 h to 1795 ± 213 kCal/24 h, p = 0.047 cold-activated MR from 1900 ± 150 kCal/24 h to 1793 ± 215 kCal/24 h, p = 0.028). There was a trend towards increased MR at room temperature following the intervention in the cold-group (p = 0.052). The difference between MR changes by the interventions between groups was statistically significant (p = 0.008 at room temperature, p = 0.032 after cold-activation). In an on-treatment analysis after exclusion of two participants that reported ≥ 8 days without cold-exposure, supraclavicular BAT volume had increased in the cold-exposure group (from 0.0175 ± 0.015 l to 0.0216 ± 0.014 l, p = 0.049).

    Conclusions

    We found evidence for plasticity in metabolic rate by avoiding to freeze compared with cold-exposure in a randomized setting in non-selected humans.

  • 4.
    Särndahl, Eva
    et al.
    Department of Biomedicine, School of Health and Medical Sciences, Örebro University, Sweden.
    Bergström, Ida
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nijm, Johnny
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Forslund, Tony
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Perretti, Mauro
    William Harvey Research Institute, Queen Mary University of London, Charterhouse Square, London EC1M 6BQ, UK.
    Jonasson, Lena
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Cardiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Enhanced Neutrophil Expression of Annexin-1 in Coronary Artery Disease2010In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 59, no 3, p. 443-440Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: A dysregulated cortisol response in patients with stable coronary artery disease (CAD) is related to systemic inflammatory activity. Moreover, a dysfunctional activation status of neutrophils in CAD has been discussed. The anti-inflammatory actions of glucocorticoids are mediated by annexin-1 (ANXA1), a protein mainly expressed by innate immune cells. An altered expression of glucocorticoid receptors (GR) and ANXA1 has been associated with glucocorticoid resistance.

    Methods and Results: Salivary cortisol levels were measured in the morning and evening during 3 consecutive days in 30 CAD patients and 30 healthy individuals. The neutrophil expression of GR and ANXA1 was determined by flow cytometry. The effect of exogenous ANXA1 was determined in neutrophil stimulation assays. The patients showed a flattened diurnal cortisol pattern compared to healthy subjects, involving higher levels in the evening. The neutrophil expression of GRtotal and GRα, as well as the ratio of GRα:GRβ expression was significantly decreased in patients, whereas the GRβ expression did not differ compared to controls. The neutrophil expression of ANXA1 was significantly increased in patients. Ex vivo, ANXA1 suppressed LTB4-induced ROS production in neutrophils from patients, but not from controls. On the other hand, ANXA1 impaired the LTB4-induced up-regulation of β2-integrins in both patients and controls.

    Conclusion: CAD patients displayed a more flattened diurnal cortisol rhythm caused by higher cortisol levels in the evening compared to healthy subjects. Our findings indicate a chronic overactivation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis but give no conclusive evidence for glucocorticoid resistance, as assessed by the neutrophil expression of GR and ANXA1. The data rather point towards an increased anti-inflammatory potential in neutrophils from patients with stable CAD.

  • 5.
    Westermark, Gunilla
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology.
    Westermark, P
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Molecular and Immunological Pathology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Pipeleers, D
    Eizirik, D
    Hellerström, C
    Fox, N
    Steiner, DF
    Andersson, A
    Differences in amyloid deposition in islets of transgenic mice expressing human islet amyloid polypeptide versus human islets implanted into nude mice. 1999In: Metabolism: Clinical and Experimental, ISSN 0026-0495, E-ISSN 1532-8600, Vol. 48, p. 448-454Article in journal (Refereed)
1 - 5 of 5
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