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  • 1.
    Gustavsson, Anders
    et al.
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Halfvarson, Jonas
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Magnuson, Anders
    Unit of Statistics and Epidemiology, Center for Clinical Research, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sandberg-Gertzén, Hanna
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Tysk, Curt
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Järnerot, Gunnar
    Division of Gastroenterology, Department of Medicine, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Long-Term Colectomy Rate After Intensive Intravenous Corticosteroid Therapy for Ulcerative Colitis Prior to the Immunosuppressive Treatment Era2007In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 102, no 11, p. 2513-2519Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES:  Corticosteroids are a cornerstone in the treatment of a severe attack of ulcerative colitis (UC). The long-term prognosis in this patient group is not well described. We studied the long-term colectomy and relapse rates in patients given intensive intravenous corticosteroid treatment (IIVT) for acute UC.

    METHODS:  A retrospective clinical study of 158 patients with UC treated in 1975–1982 with IIVT. Patients were followed-up to death, colectomy or last visit.

    RESULTS:  A total of 11 patients were excluded due to change of diagnosis (N = 10) or lost to follow-up (N = 1). The indication for index IIVT in the remaining 147 patients was a severe attack (N = 61), a moderately severe attack (N = 45), a mild attack (N = 29) or chronic continuous disease (N = 12). The median (range) duration of follow-up was 173 (4–271) months in patients escaping colectomy during the first 3 months. Three months after IIVT, the colectomy rates were 28/61 (46%) in a severe attack, 4/45 (9%) in a moderately severe, and 1/29 (3%) in a mild attack. After 10 yr, the colectomy rates were 39/61 (64%), 22/45 (49%), and 8/29 (28%), respectively. During follow-up, neither colectomy incidence beyond 3 months, time to first relapse nor relapse incidence was influenced by severity of initial attack, except for a lower relapse incidence after a severe attack.

    CONCLUSIONS:  In patients escaping colectomy during the first 3 months after IIVT, the future prognosis was similar irrespective of initial disease severity.

  • 2.
    Hjortswang, Henrik
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health-related quality of life in Swedish patients with ulcerative colitis1998In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 9,, no 00, p. 2203-2211Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective:  The aim of this study was to characterize the health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in a Swedish population of patients with ulcerative colitis.

    Methods:  A total of 211 patients with ulcerative colitis were studied. Demographic and disease-related factors were noted. HRQOL was measured by one disease specific questionnaire, the Rating Form of IBD Patient Concerns (RFIPC) and one generic, The Sickness Impact Profile (SIP). Additional questions regarding information needs, medication, and well-being were asked. Disease activity was measured by symptom cards, laboratory samples, endoscopy, and two indices of disease activity. The influence of additional concomitant disease was also evaluated.

    Results:  Functional impairment as measured by the SIP was primarily in psychological and social areas and to a lesser extent in the physical areas. The highest scores for individual items of the RFIPC were those related to potential complications, e.g., needing an ostomy appliance, needing surgery, developing cancer, losing bowel control, and uncertainty about the disease and effects of medication. Patients with active disease scored higher on both SIP and RFIPC when compared to patients in remission. Presence of coexisting disease weighted heavily on HRQOL.

    Conclusion:  Ulcerative colitis has a negative influence on the subjective functional status and seems to cause many worries and concerns. Patients in relapse had greater concerns, more impairment of functional status, and a reduced subjective sense of well-being than patients in clinical remission. Nevertheless, the patients in this Swedish study scored a much better HRQOL than has previously been reported using these questionnaires in patients with ulcerative colitis from the US, France, and Austria.

  • 3.
    Kaplan, G.G.
    et al.
    Inflammatory Bowel Disease Clinic, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada, Departments of Medicine and Community Health Sciences, Teaching Research and Wellness Center, University of Calgary, 3280 Hospital Drive NW, Calgary, AB T2N 4N1, Canada.
    Jackson, T.
    Department of Surgery, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada.
    Sands, B.E.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    Frisch, M.
    Department of Epidemiology Research, Division of Epidemiology, Statens Serum Institut, Copenhagen, Denmark.
    Andersson, Rolland E
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Korzenik, J.
    Gastrointestinal Unit, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, United States.
    The risk of developing Crohn's disease after an appendectomy: A meta-analysis2008In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 103, no 11, p. 2925-2931Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: Studies exploring the association between appendectomy and Crohn's disease (CD) have reported conflicting findings. We conducted a systematic review of the literature and a meta-analysis to assess the risk of CD following an appendectomy and determine the effect of time between appendectomy and CD diagnosis. METHODS: MEDLINE was used to identify observational studies evaluating the association between appendectomy and CD. Authors were contacted when data were insufficient. Relative risks (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a random effects model. Studies that analyzed their data by the interval between the appendectomy and the diagnosis of CD were assessed separately. The Woolf ?2 statistic was used to test for homogeneity. Egger's test was used to evaluate publication bias. RESULTS: The summary RR estimate for CD following an appendectomy was significantly elevated (RR 1.61, 95% CI 1.28-2.02), though heterogeneity was observed (P < 0.0001). The risk was elevated within the first year following the operation (RR 6.69, 95% CI 5.42-8.25). The risk of CD was also significantly increased 1-4 yr following an appendectomy (RR 1.99, 95% CI 1.66- 2.38), however, after 5 yr or more, the risk fell to baseline levels (RR 1.08, 95% CI 0.99-1.18). Publication bias was not detected (P = 0.2). CONCLUSION: The meta-analysis demonstrated a significant risk of CD following an appendectomy, though heterogeneity was observed between the studies. The elevated risk early after an appendectomy, which diminishes thereafter, likely reflects diagnostic problems in patients with incipient CD. © 2008 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.

  • 4. Levenstein, S
    et al.
    Li, Z
    Almer, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC - Medicin och kirurgicentrum, GE: gastromed.
    Marquis, P
    Moser, G
    Sperber, A
    Toner, B
    Drossman, DA
    Cross-cultural variation in disease-related concerns among patients with inflammatory bowel disease.2001In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 96, p. 1822-1830Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    Ljotsson, Brjann
    et al.
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Hedman, Erik
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Andersson, Erik
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Hesser, Hugo
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences. Linköping University, The Swedish Institute for Disability Research.
    Lindfors, Perjohan
    Sabbatsberg Hospital.
    Hursti, Timo
    Uppsala University.
    Rydh, Sara
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Ruck, Christian
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Lindefors, Nils
    Karolinska University Sjukhuset.
    Andersson, Gerhard
    Linköping University, Department of Behavioural Sciences and Learning, Clinical and Social Psychology. Linköping University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences.
    Internet-Delivered Exposure-Based Treatment vs. Stress Management for Irritable Bowel Syndrome: A Randomized Trial2011In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 106, no 8, p. 1481-1491Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Our research group has developed an internet-delivered cognitive behavioral treatment (ICBT) for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). We compared ICBT with internet-delivered stress management (ISM) for IBS to assess whether the effects of ICBT are specific. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMETHODS: This was a randomized controlled trial, including 195 self-referred participants diagnosed with IBS. The treatment interventions lasted for 10 weeks and included an online therapist contact. The ICBT emphasized acceptance of symptoms through exposure to IBS symptoms and related negative feelings. The ICBT also included mindfulness training. The ISM emphasized symptom control through relaxation techniques, dietary adjustments, and problem-solving skills. Severity of IBS symptoms was measured with the gastrointestinal symptom rating scale-IBS version (GSRS-IBS). Credibility of the treatments and expectancy of improvement were assessed with the treatment credibility scale. The participants perceived therapeutic alliance with their online therapist was measured with the working alliance inventory. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanRESULTS: At post-treatment and 6-month follow-up, 192 (99%) and 169 (87%) participants returned data, respectively. At post-treatment and 6-month follow-up, we found significant differences on the GSRS-IBS, favoring ICBT. The difference on GSRS-IBS scores was 4.8 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.2-8.4) at post-treatment and 5.9 (95% CI: 1.9-9.9) at 6-month follow-up. There were no significant differences on the treatment credibility scale or the working alliance inventory between the groups. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanCONCLUSIONS: Internet-delivered CBT has specific effects that cannot be attributed only to treatment credibility, expectancy of improvement, therapeutic alliance, or attention. Furthermore, a treatment based on exposure exercises specifically tailored for IBS may be a better treatment option than general stress and symptom management for IBS patients. ICBT is a promising treatment modality for IBS as it can be offered to IBS patients in much larger scale than conventional psychological treatments.

  • 6.
    Munch, Andreas
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Ost, Åke
    Medilab, Taby, Sweden.
    Ström, Magnus
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Increased Transmucosal Uptake of E-coli K12 in Collagenous Colitis Persists After Budesonide Treatment2009In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 104, no 3, p. 679-685Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Collagenous colitis is increasingly recognized as a common diarrheal disorder of inflammatory origin. Intestinal inflammation is generally associated with increased mucosal permeability, but little is known about barrier function in microscopic colitis. Our aim was to investigate the mucosal barrier to nonpathogenic bacteria in collagenous colitis.

    METHODS: The study included 33 individuals, 25 with collagenous colitis (14 in clinical remission, 11 with active disease, and 8 of these again after 6 weeks budesonide treatment) and 8 control patients. Bowel movements were registered for 1 week. Endoscopic biopsies from the sigmoid colon were mounted in modified Ussing chambers and assessed for short-circuit current (I-sc), transepithelial resistance (TER), and transmucosal passage of chemically killed Escherichia coli K12.

    RESULTS: Bacterial uptake was increased in patients in remission, 1.6 U (1.1-3.0) and in those with active disease, 4.6 U (2.5-5.8; median (IQR)), compared to controls, 0.7 U (0.1-1.1; P=0.004 and P=0.001, respectively). Active disease also had significant decrease in transepithelial resistance (TER) after 120 min, -9.7 Omega cm(2) ((-13)-(-4.3)), compared to controls, -5.2 Omega cm(2) ((-7.2)-(-3.1)), P=0.03; or patients in remission, -4.8 Omega cm(2) ((-8.0)-(-1.2)), P=0.04. Budesonide decreased median stool frequency to 1.9 (1.3-2.2) compared to 3.8 (3.7-4.2) before treatment (P=0.01), but bacterial uptake was still increased after budesonide 2.9 U (1.5-3.8), (P=0.006 compared to controls), and there were no significant changes in histology.

    CONCLUSIONS: Collagenous colitis presents with significantly increased uptake and altered mucosal reactivity to nonpathogenic bacteria. Budesonide induces clinical remission and restores mucosal reactivity but does not abolish the increased bacterial uptake. An underlying barrier dysfunction may explain the frequent and rapid relapses in CC.

  • 7.
    Myrelid, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden; Oxford University Hospital NHS Fdn Trust, England.
    Nordenvall, Caroline
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Pinkney, Thomas D.
    University of Birmingham, England.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Hospital Ryhov, Sweden.
    Appendectomy and the Risk of Colectomy in Ulcerative Colitis: A National Cohort Study2017In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 112, no 8, p. 1311-1319Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: Ulcerative colitis (UC) is a chronic inflammatory disease usually responding well to anti-inflammatory drugs but many patients will still need colectomy. Appendectomy is associated with a lower risk of later developing UC. We aimed to assess the longitudinal relationship between appendectomy, appendicitis, and disease course in UC patients. METHODS: A national cohort of UC patients with a diagnosis in 1964-2010 was identified from the Swedish National Patient Register that also provided information regarding appendicitis and/or appendectomy before or after the UC diagnosis. The risk for colectomy and UC-related hospital admissions was evaluated. RESULTS: Among 63,711 UC patients, 2,143 had appendectomy and 7,690 underwent colectomy. Appendectomy for appendicitis before 20 years of age and for non-appendicitis at all ages before UC diagnosis was associated with a lower risk of colectomy (hazard ratio (HR) 0.44, 0.27-0.72 and HR 0.62, 0.43-0.90, respectively), and fewer hospital admissions (incidence rate ratio (IRR) 0.68, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.64-0.73 and IRR 0.54, 0.47-0.63, respectively). Appendectomy for appendicitis after the UC diagnosis was associated with a higher risk of colectomy (HR 1.56, 1.20-2.03), whereas no such association was found for other pathology (HR 1.40, 0.79-2.47). CONCLUSIONS: Appendectomy early in life and before developing UC is associated with a lower risk of colectomy as well as UC-related hospital admissions. Appendectomy for appendicitis after established UC appears associated with a worse disease course, with an increased rate of subsequent colectomy.

  • 8.
    Olsen Faresjö, Åshild
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Grodzinsky, Ewa
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, General Practice. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Local Health Care Services in the West of Östergötland, Unit of Research and Development in Local Health Care, County of Östergötland.
    Johansson, Saga
    Cardiovascular Institute, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden; and Department of Epidemiology, AstraZeneca R and D, Mölndal, Sweden.
    Wallander, Mari-Ann
    Department of Epidemiology, AstraZeneca R and D, Mölndal, Sweden; and Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Timpka, Toomas
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Division of Preventive and Social Medicine and Public Health Science. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Åkerlind, Ingemar
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Work and Rehabilitation . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    A population based case control study of work and psychosocial problems in patients with irritable bowel syndrome: women are more seriously affected than men2007In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 102, no 2, p. 371-379Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: Everyday psychosocial functioning and quality of life are known to be reduced for patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), but few previous studies have analyzed associations with functioning in working life. Accordingly, we examined perceptions of working conditions, functioning in the workplace, quality of life, and psychological complaints among IBS patients compared with age- and sex-matched controls.

    Methods: A case–control study design was used based on 347 IBS patients from Swedish general practice who were compared with age- and sex-matched controls (N = 1,041) randomly selected from the general population. A survey was performed including validated questions concerning job strain, quality of life (SF-36 [Short Form 36]), absence because of illness, depression, anxiety, and sleeping habits.

    Results: The IBS patients reported considerably more often that their daily performance in working life was affected by their gastrointestinal problems (OR [odds ratio] 7.14, 95% CI 5.45–9.36). Male IBS cases only reported less authority regarding decisions on their working pace (OR 5.44, 95% CI 1.28–23.18), while female IBS patients reported less decision authority regarding planning their work (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.13–4.64), fewer learning opportunities at work (OR 2.12, 95% CI 1.26–3.57), and more long-term sick leave than their controls (OR 3.70, 95% CI 1.94–7.07). The female IBS cases also reported lower quality of life in all dimensions than their controls.

    Conclusion: In particular, female IBS patients reported lower authority over decisions at work and problems in their daily functioning in the workplace. These associations persisted after adjustments for possible confounders such as mood, sleeping problems, and perceived health.

  • 9.
    Schoultz, Ida
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Verma, Deepti
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Halfvarsson, Jonas
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Torkvist, Leif
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Fredrikson, Mats
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Occupational and Environmental Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjoqvist, Urban
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Lordal, Mikael
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Tysk, Curt
    Örebro University Hospital.
    Lerm, Maria
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Medical Microbiology . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderkvist, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Combined Polymorphisms in Genes Encoding the Inflammasome Components NALP3 and CARD8 Confer Susceptibility to Crohns Disease in Swedish Men2009In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 104, no 5, p. 1180-1188Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES : Crohns disease (CD) is characterized by overproduction of proinflammatory cytokines like interleukin (IL)-1 beta. Production of mature IL-1 beta is dependent on a caspase-1-activating protein complex called the NALP3 inflammasome, composed of NALP3, ASC, and CARD8. NALP3 shares structural similarities with Nod2, and both of these proteins are required for bacteria-induced IL-1 beta secretion. The combination of the polymorphisms CARD8 (C10X) and NALP3 (Q705K) was recently shown to be associated with rheumatoid arthritis. Our aim was to investigate whether these combined polymorphisms play a role in the susceptibility to CD.

    METHODS: The study included 498 CD patients in two cohorts from different regions and 742 control individuals from a Swedish population. DNA was isolated from whole blood. Polymorphisms of (Q705K) NALP3 and (C10X) CARD8, as well as the Nod2 variants, R702W and G908R, were genotyped using the Taqman single nucleotide polymorphism assay. The Nod2 frameshift mutation, L1007fs, was detected by Megabace SNuPe genotyping.

    RESULTS: Our results show that men who have both the C10X and Q705K alleles in CARD8 and NALP3, and who express wild-type alleles of Nod2 are at an increased risk of developing CD (odds ratio, OR: 3.40 range: 1.32-8.76); P = 0.011). No association with these polymorphisms was found in women (OR: 0.89 (range: 0.44-1.77); P = 0.74).

    CONCLUSIONS: We suggest a role for combined polymorphisms in CARD8 and NALP3 in the development of CD in men, with obvious sex differences in the genetic susceptibility pattern. These findings give further support to the importance of innate immune responses in CD.

  • 10.
    Tjellström, Bo
    et al.
    Microbiology and Tumour biology center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping.
    Fälth-Magnusson, Karin
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Pediatrics. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Paediatrics and Gynecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Linköping.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Midtvedt, Tore
    Microbiology and Tumour biology center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Medical Microbiology.
    Norin, E
    Microbiology and Tumour biology center, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Gut microflora associated characteristics in children with celiac disease2005In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 100, no 12, p. 2784-2788Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of the study was to investigate the metabolic function of intestinal microflora in children with celiac disease (CD) in order to find out if there is a deviant gut flora in CD patients compared to healthy controls. METHODS: The study group comprised children with CD, consecutively diagnosed according to current criteria given by the European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition. Thirty-six children were studied at presentation, i.e., on a normal gluten-containing diet, with clinical symptoms and signs indicative of CD, positive celiac serology markers, and a small bowel biopsy showing severe enteropathy. Forty-seven patients were studied when they had been on a gluten-free diet (GFD) for at least 3 months. For comparison, a group of 42 healthy controls (HC) were studied. The functional status of the intestinal microflora was evaluated by gas-liquid chromatography of short chain fatty acids (SCFAs) in fecal samples. RESULTS: There was a significant difference between untreated CD children and HC as well as between treated CD children and HC regarding acetic, i-butyric, i-valeric acid, and total SCFAs. The propionic and n-valeric acids differed significantly between CD children on GFD and HC. Moreover, there was a strong correlation between i-butyric and i-valeric acids in all study groups. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first study of the SCFA pattern in fecal samples from children with CD. The results indicate that there is a difference in the metabolic activity of intestinal microbial flora in children with CD compared to that in HC. The finding of a different pattern of some SCFAs in celiacs both at presentation and during treatment with GFD indicates that it is a genuine phenomenon of CD not affected by either the diet, the inflammation, or the autoimmune status of the patient. © 2005 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology Published by Blackwell Publishing.

  • 11.
    Zhang, Hong
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Dermatology.
    Sun, Xiao-Feng
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Oncology.
    Overexpression of cyclooxygenase-2 correlates with advanced stages of colorectal cancer2002In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, ISSN 0002-9270, E-ISSN 1572-0241, Vol. 97, no 4, p. 1037-1041Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to investigate the associations of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) with pathological features and survival in patients with colorectal cancer. METHODS: The expression of COX-2 was examined by immunohistochemistry in 112 primary colorectal cancers, with 64 samples from the corresponding normal mucosa and 16 metastases in the regional lymph nodes of patients with colorectal cancer. The associations of COX-2 expression with clinico-pathological features, including survival, were analyzed. RESULTS: The frequency and intensity of COX-2 staining were remarkably increased from the normal samples (17%) to the primary tumors (72%) and to the metastases (100%). Expressions of COX-2 were 25%, 74%, 78%, and 67% in Dukes' A, B, C, and D tumors, respectively (p = 0.005), and positively related to proliferative activity (p = 0.003). COX-2 expressions were 80% in colonic tumors and 60% in rectal tumors (p = 0.03). The expression of COX-2 was positively related to the better differentiated tumors in the colon (p = 0.04). We were unable to find any relationship of COX-2 with patient age, sex, tumor growth pattern, apoptosis, and patient survival (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: We found that the expression of COX-2 was upregulated from normal cells to primary tumors and to metastases, and related to proliferative activity, tumor location, Dukes' stage, and differentiation. These results further support the evidence that COX-2 may be involved in tumorigenesis and development of colorectal cancer. ⌐ 2002 by Am. Coll. of Gastroenterology.

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