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  • 1. Amin, AI
    et al.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Lee, AJ
    Sexton, R
    Moran, BJ
    Heald, RJ
    A 5-cm colonic J pouch colo-anal reconstruction following anterior resection for low rectal cancer results in acceptable evacuation and continence in the long term2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 33-37Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background. Optimal treatment for low rectal cancer is total mesorectal excision, with most patients suitable for low colo-rectal or colo-anal anastomosis. A colon pouch has early functional benefits, although long-term function, especially evacuation, might mitigate against its routine use. The aim of this study was to assess evacuation and continence in patients with a colon pouch, and to examine the impact of possible risk factors. Methods. In 1998, all 102 surviving patients with a colon pouch, whose stoma had been closed for more than one year, were sent a postal questionnaire. A composite incontinence score was calculated from questions on urgency, use of a pad, incontinence of gas, liquid or faeces, and a composite evacuation score from questions on medication taken to evacuate, straining, the need and number of times returned to evacuate. Results. The response rate was 90% (50 M, 42 F), with a median age of 68 years (IQR 60-78) and median follow-up of 2.6 years (IQR 1.7-3.9). The anastomosis was 3 cm or less from the anus in 45/92 (49%), and incontinence scores were worse in this group (P = 0.001). There were significantly higher incontinence scores in females (P = 0.014). Age, preoperative radiotherapy, part of colon used for anastomosis, post-operative leak and length of follow-up had no demonstrable effect on either score. Conclusion. Gender and anastomotic height were the only variables which influenced incontinence. Ninety percent of patients reported that their bowel function did not affect their overall wellbeing, and none would have preferred to have a stoma.

  • 2.
    Andersson, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Bendtsen, Preben
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Health related quality of life in Crohn's proctocolitis does not differ from a general population when in remission2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, no 1, p. 56-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  All treatment in Crohn's disease, although palliative, aims at restoring full health. The objective of this study was to compare health-related quality of life and psychosocial conditions in patients with Crohn's proctocolitis with a general population.

    Patients and methods  One hundred and twenty-seven patients with Crohn's proctocolitis (median age 44 years, 44.1% men) were compared with 266 controls (median age 45 years, 50.7% men). A questionnaire consisting of the Short Form-36 (SF-36), the Psychological General Well-Being Index (PGWB) and a visual analogue scale (VAS) evaluating general health as well as questions regarding psychosocial conditions was used. Disease activity was evaluated by Best's modification of the classical Crohn's Disease Activity Index.

    Results  Patients in remission had a health related quality of life similar to controls according to the SF-36 apart from general health where scores were lower (P < 0.01). Patients with active disease scored lower in all aspects of the SF-36 (P < 0.001 or P < 0.0001) as well as the PGWB (P < 0.0001). In a model for multiple regression including age, gender, concomitant small bowel disease, permanent stoma, previous colonic surgery, disease activity, duration, and aggressiveness, disease activity was the only variable negatively predicting all 8 domains of the SF-36 in the patient group (P < 0.001). The mean annual sick-leave for patients and controls were 33.9 and 9.5 days (P < 0.0001), respectively. Sixty-eight percent of the patients and 78.4% of the controls (P = 0.04) were married or cohabited, 67.7% and 78.0% (P = 0.04), respectively, had children.

    Conclusion  The health related quality of life for patients with Crohn's proctocolitis in remission does not differ from the general population. The disease has, however, a negative impact on parenthood, family life and professional performance.

  • 3.
    Corman, ML
    et al.
    Stony Brook University.
    Carriero, A
    Hager, T
    Herold, A
    Jayne, DG
    Lehur, PS
    Lomanto, D
    Longo, A
    Mellgren, AF
    Nicholls, J
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Karolinska University Hospital .
    Senagore, AJ
    Stuto, A
    Wexner, SD
    Consensus conference on the stapled transanal rectal resection (STARR) for disordered defaecation2006In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 8, no 2, p. 98-101Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    An international working party was convened in Rome, Italy on 16–17 June, 2005, with the purpose of developing a consensus on the application of the circular stapling instrument to the treatment of certain rectal conditions, the so-called Stapled Transanal Rectal Resection (STARR). Since the procedure has been submitted to only limited objective analysis it was felt prudent to hold a meeting of interested individuals for the purpose of evaluating the current status and to make conclusions and recommendations concerning the applicability of this new approach.

  • 4. Corman, ML
    et al.
    Gravié, J-F
    Hager, T
    Loudon, MA
    Mascagni, D
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Seow-Choen, F
    Abcarian, H
    Marcello, P
    Weiss, E
    Longo, A
    Stapled haemorrhoidopexy: a consensus position paper by an international working party - indications, contra-indications and technique2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, p. 304-310Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5.
    El-Salhy, Magdy
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Molecular and Clinical Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MC - Medicincentrum, EMT-magtarm.
    Chronic idiopathic slow transit constipation: pathophysiology and management.2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, p. 288-296Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 6.
    Floodeen, H
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Rutegard, J
    Umeå University Hospital, Sweden .
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Matthiessen, P
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden .
    Early and late symptomatic anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer: are they different entities?2013In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 15, no 3, p. 334-340Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The aim of the study was to compare patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage following low anterior resection of the rectum (LAR) for cancer diagnosed during the initial hospital stay with those in whom leakage was diagnosed after hospital discharge. Method Forty-five patients undergoing LAR (n=234) entered into a randomized multicentre trial (NCT 00636948), who developed symptomatic anastomotic leakage, were identified. A comparison was made between patients diagnosed during the initial hospital stay on median postoperative day 8 (early leakage, EL; n=27) and patients diagnosed after hospital discharge at median postoperative day 22 (late leakage, LL; n=18). Patient characteristics, operative details, postoperative course and anatomical localization of the leakage were analysed. Results Leakage from the circular stapler line of an end-to-end anastomosis was more common in EL, while leakage from the stapler line of the efferent limb of the J-pouch or side-to-end anastomosis tended to be more frequent in LL (P=0.057). Intra-operative blood loss (P=0.006) and operation time (P=0.071) were increased in EL compared with LL. On postoperative day 5, EL performed worse than LL with regard to temperature (P=0.021), oral intake (P=0.006) and recovery of bowel activity (P=0.054). Anastomotic leakage was diagnosed most often by a rectal contrast study in EL and by CT scan in LL. The median initial hospital stay was 28days for EL and 10days for LL (Pandlt;0.001). Conclusion The present study has demonstrated that symptomatic anastomotic leakage can present before and after hospital discharge and raises the question of whether early and late leakage after LAR may be different entities.

  • 7.
    Gerjy, Roger
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Derwinger, K.
    Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Göteborg.
    Lindhoff-Larsson, Anna
    Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery UHL.
    Nyström, P-O
    Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm.
    Long-term results of stapled haemorrhoidopexy in a prospective single centre study of 153 patients with 1-6 years follow-up2012In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 14, no 4, p. 490-496Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The long-term results of stapled haemorrhoidopexy for prolapsed haemorrhoids were assessed using uniform methods to acquire data and pre-set definitions of failure, recurrence, residual symptoms and impaired continence. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanMethod From October 1999 to May 2005, 153 patients underwent a stapled haemorrhoidopexy and were enrolled prospectively. They were assessed preoperatively, postoperatively and at the end of the study from replies to a questionnaire about symptoms and continence. Preoperatively, manual reduction of prolapse was required in 103 patients, skin tags were found in 115 patients (circumferential in 22) and impaired continence in 63. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanResults In all, 145 patients completed preoperative and long-term protocols and were analysed as paired data, at a mean follow-up of 32 months. Failure to control the prolapse or recurrence was seen in 19 (13%) patients including nine reoperations for prolapse. Symptoms improved from 8.1 to 2.5 points on a 15-point scale (P = 0.001). Symptoms were not controlled in 25 (17%) patients. Continence improved from 4.7 to 2.9 points on a 15-point scale (P = 0.001). Twenty-five (17%) patients still had a continence disturbance. Altogether 51 (35%) patients had a deficient outcome with respect to prolapse, symptoms or continence. There were no major adverse events. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanConclusion Restoration of the anal anatomy by stapled haemorrhoidopexy resulted in a significant improvement in haemorrhoid-associated symptoms and continence but a third of patients had poor symptom control including 13% with persisting prolapse.

  • 8.
    Hallböök, Olof
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Matthiessen, P
    Leinsköld, Ted
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Safety of the temporary loop ileostomy2002In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 4, no 5, p. 361-364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. To evaluate the complications of the temporary loop ileostomy. Method. A retrospective study of 222 consecutive patients with low anterior resection, ileal pouch-anal anastomosis or continent ileostomy and a diverting loop ileostomy routinely fashioned during the primary operation. The loop ileostomy was closed in 213 patients (96%) during the minimum follow-up period of 15 months. Results. Four patients (2%) required preterm closure of the ostomy due to stomal retraction (n = 3) or bowel obstruction (n = 1). Four patients were readmitted due to transient bowel obstruction that resolved without surgery. After closure of the loop ileostomy a total of 27 patients (13%) had complications. In 7 patients emergency re-operation was done due to small bowel obstruction (n = 5) or intra-abdominal abscess (n = 2). Elective re-operation was done in 5 patients for hernia at the site of the previous stoma. Despite the use of a loop ileostomy there was 1 postoperative death after the initial operation in consequence of anastomotic leakage. There was 1 death in consequence of closure of the loop ileostomy after 3 weeks due to intra-abdominal sepsis and heart failure. Conclusion. In this series closure of the ostomy was associated with one death (0.5%) and overall ostomy-related morbidity included the need to re-operate in 6%.

  • 9.
    Heedman, P. A.
    et al.
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden. Palliat Educ and Research Centre, Sweden.
    Canslatt, E.
    Lanssjukhuset Kalmar, Sweden.
    Henriks, G.
    Jonköping County Council, Sweden.
    Starkhammar, Hans
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Fomichov, Victoria
    Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Region Östergötland, Center for Health and Developmental Care, Regional Cancer Center South East Sweden.
    Variation at presentation among colon cancer patients with metastases: a population-based study2015In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 17, no 5, p. 403-408Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimThe study aimed to describe and follow a 2year cohort of colon cancer patients with Stage IV disease from presentation to long-term outcome. MethodThe records of 177 colon cancer patients diagnosed in southeast Sweden during 2009-2010 with disseminated disease at presentation were reviewed retrospectively. ResultsThe patients were heterogeneous with respect to age, performance status and survival. Despite metastatic disease, local symptoms from the primary tumour dominated the initial clinical picture. Forty-one per cent had anaemia. The time from suspicion of colon cancer to established diagnosis of disseminated disease varied from 0 to 231days (emergency cases included, median 12days). The majority (77%) were diagnosed in hospital. In 53% the primary tumour and the metastases were not diagnosed on the same occasion which may increase the risk for misinformation or delays in the care process. The possibility of simultaneous diagnosis was doubled when the patient was investigated as an inpatient. Patients were seen by one to 12 physicians (median three) in the investigation phase, and one to 47 (median 11) from diagnosis until the last record in the hospital notes. The 1-year survival was 46%. ConclusionPatients with metastatic colon cancer at presentation are heterogeneous and warrant an adapted multidisciplinary approach to achieve the goal of individualized treatment for each patient in accordance with the Swedish national cancer strategy.

  • 10.
    Matthiessen, P.
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, S-701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Henriksson, M.
    Department of Radiology, Örebro University Hospital, S-701 85 Örebro, Sweden.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Grunditz, E.
    Department of Radiology, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Norén, Bengt
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Radiology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medical Imaging, Department of Radiology in Linköping.
    Arbman, G.
    Department of Surgery, Vrinnevi Hospital, Norrköping, Sweden.
    Increase of serum C-reactive protein is an early indicator of subsequent symptomatic anastomotic leakage after anterior resection2008In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 10, no 1, p. 75-80Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective: This prospective study investigated the factors which might indicate anastomotic leakage after low anterior resection.

    Method: Thirty-three patients who underwent anterior resection for rectal carcinoma (n = 32) and severe dysplasia (n = 1), were monitored daily by serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and white blood cell count (WBC) estimations until discharge from hospital. Computed tomography (CT) scans were performed on postoperative days 2 and 7 and the amount of presacral fluid collection was assessed. All patients had a pelvic drain and the volume of drainage was measured daily.

    Results: The level of the anastomosis was at a median 5 cm (3-12 cm) above the anal verge. There was no 30-day mortality. Nine (27.2%) of the 33 patients developed a symptomatic anastomotic leakage which was diagnosed at a median of 8 days (range 4-14) postoperatively. The serum CRP was increased in patients who leaked from postoperative day 2 onwards (P = 0.004 on day 2, P < 0.001 on day 3-8). The WBC was decreased in preoperatively irradiated patients on days 1-5 (P = 0.021), with no difference seen between patients with or without leakage. Patients with leakage had a larger presacral fluid collection on CT on day 7 (median 76 ml vs 52 ml, P = 0.016) and a larger increase in the fluid collection between the first and the second CT examinations (28 ml vs 3 ml, P = 0.046).

    Conclusion: An early rise in serum CRP was a strong indicator of leakage. Monitoring of CRP for possible early detection of symptomatic anastomotic leakage is recommended.

  • 11.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Andersson, M.
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Rutegård, J.
    University Hospital Örebro, Örebro, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Division of surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Risk factors for anastomotic leakage after anterior resection of the rectum2004In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 6, no 6, p. 462-469Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective. Surgical technique and peri-operative management of rectal carcinoma have developed substantially in the last decades. Despite this, morbidity and mortality after anterior resection of the rectum are still important problems. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for anastomotic leakage in anterior resection and to assess the role of a temporary stoma and the need for urgent re-operations in relation to anastomotic leakage.

    Patients and methods. In a nine-year period, from 1987 to 1995, a total of 6833 patients underwent elective anterior resection of the rectum in Sweden. A random sample of 432 of these patients was analysed (sample size 6.3%). The associations between death and 10 patient-and surgery-related variables were studied by univariate and multivariate analysis. Data were obtained by review of the hospital files from all patients.

    Results. The incidence of symptomatic clinically evident anastomotic leakage was 12% (53/432). The 30-day mortality was 2.1% (140/6833). The rate of mortality associated with leakage was 7.5%. A temporary stoma was initially fashioned in 17% (72/432) of the patients, and 15% (11/72) with a temporary stoma had a clinical leakage, compared with 12% (42/360) without a temporary stoma, not significant. Multivariate analysis showed that low anastomosis (≤ 6 cm), pre-operative radiation, presence of intra-opcrative adverse events and male gender were independent risk factors for leakage. The risk for permanent stoma after leakage was 25%. Females with stoma leaked in 3% compared to men with stoma who leaked in 29%. The median hospital stay for patients Arithout leakage was 10 days (range 5-61 days) and for patients with leakage 22 days (3-110 days).

    Conclusion. In this population based study, 12% of the patients had symptomatic anastomotic leakage after anterior resection of the rectum. Postoperative 30-day mortality was 2.1%. Low anastomosis, pre-operative radiation, presence of intra-operative adverse events and male gender were independent risk factors for symptomatic anastomotic leakage in the multivariate analysis. There was no difference in the use of temporary stoma in patients with or without anastomotic leakage.

  • 12.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    et al.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Lindgren, R.
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Rutegård, J.
    Department of Surgery and Perioperative Science, Umeå University Hospital, Umeå, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge following low anterior resection for rectal cancer2010In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 12, no 7, p. E82-E87Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective The aim of this study was to investigate patients with symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge. Method Patients (n = 234) undergoing low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer who were included in a prospective multicentre trial (NCT 00636948) and who developed symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge (late leakage, LL; n = 18) were identified. Patient characteristics, operative details, recovery on postoperative day 5, length of hospital stay, and how the leakage was diagnosed were recorded. A comparison with those who did not develop symptomatic leakage (no leakage, NL; n = 189) was made. The minimum follow up was 24 months. Results In the LL patients the median age was 69 years, 61% were female patients, and 6% had stage IV cancer disease. On postoperative day 5, the LL group had a postoperative course similar to the NL group regarding temperature, oral intake and bowel function. The proportion of patients on antibiotic treatment on postoperative day 5, regardless of indication, was 28% in the LL compared with 4% in the NL group (P < 0.001). The median initial hospital stay was 10 days for both groups. When readmission for any reason was added, the hospital stay rose to a median of 21.5 and 13 days in the LL and the NL groups respectively (P < 0.001). Conclusion Symptomatic anastomotic leakage diagnosed after hospital discharge following low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer is not uncommon and has an immediate clinical postoperative course which may appear uneventful.

  • 13.
    Morren, Geert
    et al.
    Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Hallböök, Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nyström, Per-Olof
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Baeten, C. G. M. I.
    Department of General Surgery, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, The Netherlands.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Audit of anal-sphincter repair2001In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 3, no 1, p. 17-22Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective

    Structural damage of the anterior part of the anal sphincter is a major cause of faecal incontinence. Sphincter repair is the standard surgical treatment. This study was designed to analyse the results of anal sphincter repair, to identify possible predictors of outcome and to investigate the presence of bowel symptoms other than leakage at follow up.

    Patients and methods

    Fifty-five women (median age 39 years, range 24–73 years) who underwent anal sphincter repair between 1986 and 1997 at the University Hospital of Linköping answered a postal questionnaire. Current bowel function, degree of continence and the patients’ functional result as worse, unchanged, some improvement, good or excellent were assessed. Good or excellent function was regarded as a successful result, the rest as failure. Age, duration of symptoms, type of surgery, morbidity and length of follow up were analysed in relation to outcome. Results of pre- and post-operative anal manometry, endoanal ultrasound, anal sphincter electromyography and pudendal nerve function were also analysed.

    Results

    After a median (range) follow-up period of 40 months (5–137) months, 31 (56%) patients rated the result as either excellent (n=10) or good (n=21). Twenty-one (38%) patients rated the result as some improvement (n=14), unchanged (n=6) or worse (n=1). In three (5%) patients a colostomy was fashioned because of failure. Patients >50 years at surgery (n=18) had a worse outcome (P=0.001). Successful outcome was correlated to increased squeeze pressures post-operatively. The presence of post-operative urgency (P=0.01) and loose stools (P=0.02) was more common in patients with poor outcome. Eight patients became continent to formed and liquid stool.

  • 14.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Editorial Material: One step ahead in the care of Crohns disease in COLORECTAL DISEASE, vol 17, issue 4, pp 277-2782015In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 17, no 4, p. 277-278Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 15.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Less is more - time to concentrate experience to improve outcomes?2016In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 18, no 9, p. 837-838Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 16.
    Myrelid, Pär
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Oncology Centre.
    Split Stoma in Resectional Surgery of High Risk Patients with Ileocolonic Crohn’s Disease2012In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 14, no 2, p. 188-193Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objectives: Surgery for Crohn’s disease (CD) is at high risk of anastomotic complications, with severe postoperative morbidity and even mortality. This retrospective study of high risk CD patients compared the outcome of primary anastomosis (PA) with that of split stoma (SS) and delayed anastomosis (DA).

    Methods: We performed 146 operations for ileocolonic CD from 1995-2006. Patient data were obtained from a prospectively registered data base. Patients with ≥2 preoperative risk factors (n=76) constituted high risk patients. Outcomes following PA or SS with DA were assessed.

    Results: The number of risk factors (mean) was 2.4 in the PA group and 3.5 in the SS group at time of resection and 0.2 (p<0.0001) at time of DA after 5.0 (2.3-12.6) months. Anastomotic complications occurred in 19 % (11/57) after PA compared with 0 % (0/19) after DA (p=0.038). The total number of operations and in-hospital time was 1.9 (±1.5) and 20.9 (±35.6) days after PA compared with 2.0 (±0.2) and 17.8 (±10.4) days after DA (p=0.70 and p=0.74).

    Conclusions: SS in high risk ileocolonic resections for CD, reduces the number of risk factors at the time of DA and the risk for anastomotic complications, compared to PA, without adding inhospital time or number of operations.

  • 17.
    Nordenvall, C.
    et al.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Ekbom, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Bottai, M.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Smedby, K. E.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Nilsson, P. J.
    Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Probability, rate and timing of reconstructive surgery following colectomy for inflammatory bowel disease in Sweden: a population-based cohort study2015In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 17, no 10, p. 882-890Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Many patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) need colectomy, but the rate of reconstructive surgery with restoration of intestinal continuity is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the probability, rate and timing of reconstructive surgery after colectomy in patients with IBD in a population-based setting. Method The study cohort included all patients with IBD in Sweden who underwent colectomy from 2000 to 2009. Each patient was followed from admission for colectomy to admission for reconstructive surgery, date of death, migration or 31 December 2010. Kaplan-Meier survival curves and multivariable Poisson regression models were used to describe the probability, rate and timing of reconstructive surgery. Results Out of 2818 IBD patients treated with colectomy, 61.0% were male and 78.9% had ulcerative colitis. No reconstructive surgery had been performed in 1595 (56.6%) patients by the end of follow-up. Of the remaining 1223 patients, 526 underwent primary reconstructive surgery and 697 had a secondary reconstruction following a median interval of 357 days from primary surgery in the form of colectomy. The probability of reconstructive surgery was dependent on age (55.6% and 18.1% at ages 15-29 and greater than= 59 years, respectively), and the chance of reconstructive surgery was higher in hospitals that performed more than 13 colectomies for IBD per year [incidence rate ratio and 95% confidence interval 1.27 (1.09-1.49)]. Conclusion Fewer than half of the patients having a colectomy for IBD underwent subsequent reconstructive surgery. Older age and low hospital volume were risk factors for no reconstructive surgery.

  • 18.
    Olaison, Gunnar
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Smedh, Kenneth
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, MKC-2, GE: Gastrokir.
    On-table endoscopy to define strictures and resection margins: Experience from 178 operations for Crohn's disease using intraoperative endoscopy2001In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 3, no SUPPL. 2, p. 58-62Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [No abstract available]

  • 19.
    Pasternak, Björn
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Matthiessen, Peter
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Jansson, Kjell
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Andersson, Magnus
    Department of Surgery, Örebro University Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Aspenberg, Per
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Elevated intraperitoneal matrix metalloproteinases-8 and -9 in patients who develop anastomotic leakage after rectal cancer surgery: a pilot study2010In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 12, no 7, p. e93-e98Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Objective  Experimental studies suggest that matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) enzymes mediate the early tissue breakdown that leads to a decrease in intestinal anastomotic strength. Patients with upregulation of MMPs in intestinal biopsies have an increased rate of anastomotic leakage. We measured MMPs and their inhibitors [tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs)] in postoperative intraperitoneal fluid after rectal cancer surgery, and hypothesized that they would be elevated in patients who later would develop anastomotic leakage.

    Method  Twenty-nine patients with rectal carcinoma underwent low anterior resection of the rectum for cancer. Intraperitoneal fluid was collected via a pelvic drain at a median of 4 h postoperatively. MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, -9 and -13 were determined using particle-based multiplex flow-cytometry. TIMP-1 and -2 were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. MMP-9 was considered the main outcome variable.

    Results  Ten patients developed anastomotic leakage. These patients had increased intraperitoneal MMP-9 [median difference (m.d.) 29%; P = 0.03] and MMP-8 (m.d. 58%; P = 0.02), compared with patients who did not develop leakage. There were no differences between the groups for other MMPs and TIMPs.

    Conclusion  Matrix metalloproteinase-8 and -9 appear to have an important role in the development of anastomotic leakage and may be promising pharmacological targets to protect anastomotic integrity. We suggest further investigation of MMPs as markers for anastomotic leakage.

  • 20.
    Sakari, T.
    et al.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Pahlman, L.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Karlbom, U.
    Uppsala University, Sweden.
    Role of icodextrin in the prevention of small bowel obstruction. Safety randomized patients control of the first 300 in the ADEPT trial2016In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 18, no 3, p. 295-300Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimAdhesions are the most common cause of small bowel obstruction (SBO). The costs of hospitalization and surgery for SBO are substantial for the health-care system. The adhesion-limiting potential of icodextrin has been shown in patients undergoing surgery for gynaecological diseases. A randomized, multicentre trial in colorectal cancer surgery started in 2009 with the aim of evaluating whether icodextrin could reduce the long-term risk of surgery for SBO. Because of some concerns about complications (especially anastomotic leakage) after icodextrin use, a preplanned interim analysis of morbidity and mortality was conducted. MethodPatients with colorectal cancer without metastasis were randomized 1:1 to receive standard surgery, with or without instillation of icodextrin in the abdominal cavity. For the first 300 patients, the 30-day follow-up data were collected from the Swedish ColoRectal Cancer Registry (SCRCR). Pre-, per- and postoperative data, morbidity and mortality were analysed. ResultsOf the 300 randomized patients, 288 had a data file in the SCRCR. Twelve patients did not have cancer and another five did not have a resection, leaving 283 for analysis. The authors were blinded to the randomization groups. Demographic data were similar in both groups. The overall complication rate was 24% in Group 1 and 23% in Group 2 (P=0.89). Four cases of anastomotic leakage were reported in Group 1 and five were reported in Group 2 (P=1.0). Mortality, intensive care unit (ICU) stay and re-operations did not differ between the groups. ConclusionThe pre-planned safety analysis of the first 300 patients enrolled in this randomized trial did not show any differences in adverse effects related to the use of icodextrin. All data were gathered from the SCRCR, giving us a strong message that we can continue to include patients in the trial.

  • 21.
    Segelman, J.
    et al.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Ersta Hosp, Sweden.
    Mattsson, I.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Jung, Bärbel
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Nilsson, P. J.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Palmer, G.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Buchli, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Risk factors for anastomotic leakage following ileosigmoid or ileorectal anastomosis2018In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 20, no 4, p. 304-311Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim

    Reconstruction with an ileosigmoidal anastomosis (ISA) or ileorectal anastomosis (IRA) is a surgical option after a subtotal colectomy. Anastomotic leakage (AL) is a problematic complication and high rates have been reported, but there is limited understanding of the risk factors involved. The aim of this study was to assess the established and potential predictors of AL following ISA and IRA.

    Method

    This was a retrospective cohort study including all patients who had undergone ISA or IRA at three Swedish referral centres for colorectal surgery between January 2007 and March 2015. Data regarding clinical characteristics, treatment and outcome were collected from medical records. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the association between patient and treatment related factors and the cumulative incidence of AL.

    Results

    In total, 227 patients were included. Overall, AL was detected amongst 30 patients (13.2%). Amongst patients undergoing colectomy with synchronous ISA or IRA (one‐stage procedure), AL occurred in 23 out of 120 (19.2%) compared with seven out of 107 (6.5%) after stoma reversal with ISA or IRA (two‐stage procedure) (= 0.004). In addition, the multivariate analyses revealed a statistically significantly lower odds ratio for AL following a two‐stage procedure (OR 0.10, 95% CI 0.03–0.41, = 0.001).

    Conclusions

    This study confirms high rates of AL following ISA and IRA. In particular, a synchronous procedure with colectomy and ISA/IRA carries a high risk of AL.

  • 22.
    Siekmann, W.
    et al.
    Örebro University Hospital, Sweden; Örebro University, Sweden.
    Eintrei, Christina
    Linköping University, Department of Medical and Health Sciences, Division of Drug Research. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Anaesthetics, Operations and Specialty Surgery Center, Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care in Linköping.
    Magnuson, A.
    Örebro University, Sweden.
    Sjölander, A.
    Lund University, Sweden.
    Matthiessen, P.
    Örebro University, Sweden; Örebro University Hospital, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Gupta, A.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Surgical and not analgesic technique affects postoperative inflammation following colorectal cancer surgery: a prospective, randomized study2017In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 19, no 6, p. O186-O195Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim Epidural analgesia reduces the surgical stress response. However, its effect on pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in the genesis of inflammation following major abdominal surgery remains unclear. Our main objective was to elucidate whether perioperative epidural analgesia prevents the inflammatory response following colorectal cancer surgery. Methods Ninety-six patients scheduled for open or laparoscopic surgery were randomized to epidural analgesia (group E) or patient-controlled intravenous analgesia (group P). Surgery and anaesthesia were standardized in both groups. Plasma cortisol, insulin and serum cytokines [interleukin 1 beta (IL-1 beta), IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p70, IL-13, tumour necrosis factor , interferon , granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor, prostaglandin E-2 and vascular endothelial growth factor] were measured preoperatively (T0), 1-6h postoperatively (T1) and 3-5days postoperatively (T2). Mixed model analysis was used, after logarithmic transformation when appropriate, for analyses of cytokines and stress markers. Results There were no significant differences in any serum cytokine concentration between groups P and E at any time point except for IL-10 which was 87% higher in group P [median and range 4.1 (2.3-9.2) pg/ml] compared to group E [2.6 (1.3-4.7) pg/ml] (P = 0.002) at T1. There was no difference in plasma cortisol and insulin between the groups at any time point after surgery. A significant difference in median serum cytokine concentration was found between open and laparoscopic surgery with higher levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IL-10 at T1 in patients undergoing open surgery compared to laparoscopic surgery. No difference in serum cytokine concentration was detected between the groups or between the surgical technique at T2. Conclusions Open surgery, compared to laparoscopic surgery, has greater impact on these inflammatory mediators than epidural analgesia vs intravenous analgesia.

  • 23.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    et al.
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Anal and rectal cancer in Crohn's disease2003In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 5, no 5, p. 490-495Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Several epidemiological studies have been published regarding the risk of Crohn's disease- associated colorectal cancer. The findings are, however, contradictory and it has been particularly difficult to obtain indisputable information on the incidence of cancer limited to the rectum and the anus. During 1987-2000 rectal or anal cancer was diagnosed in 335 patients in Sweden (153 males, 182 females). In other words, approximately 3 Crohn patients per million inhabitants were diagnosed with rectal or anal cancer every year during that time period which is 1% of the total number of cases. At diagnosis of cancer 36% were aged below 50 years and 58% below 60 years. Corresponding figures for all cases of anal and rectal cancer were 5% and 18%, respectively. Present knowledge from the literature implies that there is an increased risk of rectal and anal cancer only in Crohn's disease patients with severe proctitis or severe chronic perianal disease. However, the rectal remnant must also be considered a risk factor. Multimodal treatment is similar to that in sporadic cancer but proctectomy and total or partial colectomy is added depending on the extent of the Crohn's disease. The outcome is the same as in sporadic cancer at a corresponding stage but the prognosis is often poor due to the advanced stage of cancer at diagnosis. We suggest that six high-risk groups should be recommended annual surveillance after a duration of Crohn's disease of 15 years including extensive colitis, chronic severe anorectal disese, rectal remnant, strictures, bypassed segments and sclerosing cholangitis.

  • 24.
    Sjödahl, Rune
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Schulz, C
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Long-term quality of life in patients with permanent sigmoid colostomy2012In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 14, no 6, p. E335-E338Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Aim The study aimed to assess quality of life (QoL) in patients with a sigmoid colostomy using a simple general and disease-specific instrument. A subgroup not doing well was identified and examined further. Method The Short Health Scale (SHS) is a four-item instrument exploring severity of symptoms, function in daily life, worry, and general well-being, using visual analogue scales ranging from 0 to 100 where 100 is the worst possible situation. The SHS was delivered to 206 patients with a sigmoid colostomy. It was returned by 181 (87.9%) patients [88 men; median age 73 (3391) years]. Follow-up was 61 (10484) months for 178 (86.4%) patients returning usable questionnaires. A subgroup of 16 patients scoring more than 50 in all four items of the SHS was further examined with StomaQOL where 100 is best possible. Results The median score for severity of symptoms was 18 (295), function in daily life 21 (095), worry 17 (398) and general well-being 22 (099). A score of andlt; 50 in the SHS was recorded in 84.9%, 82.1%, 79.9% and 70.5% respectively. In the group scoring more than 50 in all four items patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome constituted 43.8% to compare with 5.6% in the entire study group (P andlt; 0.001). Median score for StomaQOL was 37 (2262) in this group. Conclusion Most patients with a permanent sigmoid colostomy have a good QoL consistent with previous findings. However, this is reduced in a subgroup of patients diagnosed with irritable bowel syndrome.

  • 25.
    Worley, G.
    et al.
    St Marks Hosp, England; Acad Inst, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Nordenvall, C.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Karolinska Univ Hosp, Sweden.
    Askari, A.
    St Marks Hosp, England; Acad Inst, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Pinkney, T.
    Univ Birmingham, England.
    Burns, E.
    St Marks Hosp, England; Acad Inst, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Akbar, A.
    St Marks Hosp, England; Acad Inst, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Olen, O.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden; Sachs Children and Youth Hosp, Sweden.
    Ekbom, A.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Bottai, M.
    Karolinska Inst, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Faiz, O.
    St Marks Hosp, England; Acad Inst, England; Imperial Coll London, England.
    Restorative surgery after colectomy for ulcerative colitis in England and Sweden: observations from a comparison of nationwide cohorts2018In: Colorectal Disease, ISSN 1462-8910, E-ISSN 1463-1318, Vol. 20, no 9, p. 804-812Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    AimA longstanding disparity exists between the approaches to restorative surgery after colectomy for patients with ulcerative colitis (UC) in England and Sweden. This study aims to compare rates of colectomy and restorative surgery in comparable national cohorts. MethodThe English Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) and Swedish National Patient Register (NPR) were interrogated between 2002 and April 2012. Patients with two diagnostic episodes for UC (age 15 years) were included. Patients were excluded if they had an episode of inflammatory bowel disease or colectomy before 2002. The cumulative incidences of colectomy and restorative surgery were calculated using the Kaplan-Meier method. ResultsA total of 98 691 patients were included in the study, 76 129 in England and 22 562 in Sweden. The 5-year cumulative incidence of all restorative surgery after colectomy in England was 33% vs 46% in Sweden (P-value amp;lt; 0.001). Of the patients undergoing restorative surgery, 92.3% of English patients had a pouch vs 38.8% in Sweden and 7.7% vs 59.1% respectively had an ileorectal anastomosis (IRA). The 5-year cumulative incidence of colectomy in this study cohort was 13% in England and 6% in Sweden (P-value amp;lt; 0.001). ConclusionFollowing colectomy for UC only one-third of English patients and half of Swedish patients underwent restorative surgery. In England nearly all these patients underwent pouches, in Sweden a less significant majority underwent IRAs. It is surprising to demonstrate this discrepancy in a comparable cohort of patients from similar healthcare systems. The causes and consequences of this international variation in management are not fully understood and require further investigation.

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