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  • 1.
    Abdalla, Maie
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of General Surgery, Faculty of Medicine, Suez Canal University, Egypt.
    Norblad, Rickard
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Olsson, Malin
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Landerholm, Kalle
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Andersson, Peter
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Norrköping.
    Söderholm, Johan D.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Andersson, Roland
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Department of Surgery, Ryhov County Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden.
    Myrelid, Pär
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Surgery, Orthopedics and Oncology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center for Surgery, Orthopaedics and Cancer Treatment, Department of Surgery in Linköping.
    Anorectal Function After Ileo-Rectal Anastomosis Is Better than Pelvic Pouch in Selected Ulcerative Colitis Patients2019In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    BACKGROUND: With a lifelong perspective, 12% of ulcerative colitis patients will need a colectomy. Further reconstruction via ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouch can be affected by patients' perspective of their quality of life after surgery.

    AIM: To assess the function and quality of life after restorative procedures with either ileo-rectal anastomosis or ileal pouch-anal anastomosis in relation to the inflammatory activity on endoscopy and in biopsies.

    METHOD: A total of 143 UC patients operated with subtotal colectomy and ileo-rectal anastomosis or pouches between 1992 and 2006 at Linköping University Hospital were invited to participate. Those who completed the validated questionnaires (Öresland score, SF-36, Short Health Scale) were offered an endoscopic evaluation including multiple biopsies. Associations between anorectal function and quality of life with type of restorative procedure and severity of endoscopic and histopathologic grading of inflammation were evaluated.

    RESULTS: Some 77 (53.9%) eligible patients completed questionnaires, of these 68 (88.3%) underwent endoscopic evaluation after a median follow-up of 12.5 (range 3.5-19.4) years after restorative procedure. Patients with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better overall Öresland score: median = 3 (IQR 2-5) for ileo-rectal anastomosis (n = 38) and 10 (IQR 5-15) for pouch patients (n = 39) (p < 0.001). Anorectal function (Öresland score) and endoscopic findings (Baron-Ginsberg score) were positively correlated in pouch patients (tau: 0.28, p = 0.006).

    CONCLUSION: Patients operated with ileo-rectal anastomosis reported better continence compared to pouches. Minor differences were noted regarding the quality of life. Ileo-rectal anastomosis is a valid option for properly selected ulcerative colitis patients if strict postoperative endoscopic surveillance is carried out.

  • 2.
    Berg, Anna
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Redéen, Stefan
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Sjöstrand, Sven-Erik
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Care, Pharmacology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Cell biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Effect of nitric oxide on histamine-induced cytological transformations in parietal cells in isolated human gastric glands2007In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 52, no 1, p. 126-136Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Previous studies have shown that nitric oxide (NO) inhibits histamine-induced gastric acid secretion in isolated human gastric glands. NO synthase has been found to be present in the human oxyntic mucosa and has been suggested to serve as a paracrine regulator of gastric acid secretion. Histamine stimulation of parietal cells induces cytoskeletal rearrangements, recruitment of H +/K +-ATPase-rich tubulovesicles to the apical membrane and expansion of intracellular canaliculi. The aim of the present study was thus to investigate (i) the effect of an NO donor on histamine-induced cytological transformations and (ii) the influence of increased [Ca 2+] i on NO-induced morphological changes in human parietal cells. Human gastric glands were isolated and subjected to the NO donor SNAP prior to histamine administration. [Ca 2+] i was increased by photolysis of the caged Ca 2+ compound NP-EGTA. The distribution of F-actin, ezrin, and H +/K +-ATPase was assessed by confocal microscopy. Ultrastructural analysis was performed using transmission electron microscopy. SNAP did not influence the histamine-induced translocation of F-actin, ezrin, and H +/K +-ATPase but prevented an increase in the canalicular size. Elevation of [Ca 2+] i in resting cells was found to mimic histamine-induced intraparietal cell transformations; however, NO-induced parietal cell morphology was unaffected by a rise in [Ca 2+] i. These results indicate that NO inhibits secretion of fluid into the canalicular lumen without affecting membrane recruitment and that this effect is Ca 2+-insensitive. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

  • 3.
    Borch, Kurt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Jönsson, Kjell-Åke
    Petersson, Fredrik
    Redéen, Stefan
    Mårdh, Sven
    Franzén, Lennart
    Prevalence of gastroduodenitis and Helicobacter priori infection in a general population sample: relations to symptomatology and life-style2000In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 45, no 7, p. 1322-1329Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Some benign and malignant diseases develop on the background of chronic gastritis or duodenitis. The present study was performed in order to determine the magnitude of these background changes with relations to symptomatology and life style in the general population. Examinations were performed in 501 volunteers (age 35–85 years). Fifty percent had gastritis; this was associated with H. pylori in 87%. H. pylori-negative gastritis was associated with regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.8 (1.6–9.9)]. Duodenitis, observed in 32%, was associated with H. pylori infection [odds ratio 2.3 (1.3–4.6)], previous cholecystectomy [odds ratio 3.6 (1.1–16.1)], and regular use of NSAIDs [odds ratio 3.0 (1.4–7.1)]. Neither gastritis nor duodenitis was associated with smoking or alcohol consumption. The rate of digestive symptoms did not differ between subjects with and without uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis. In conclusion, half of this adult population had gastritis strongly associated with H. pylori infection. Gastritis without H. pylori infection was frequently associated with regular NSAID intake. One third had duodenitis, which was associated with H. pylori infection as well as with regular use of NSAIDs and previous cholecystectomy. Digestive symptoms were not overrepresented in uncomplicated gastritis or duodenitis.

  • 4.
    Borch, Kurt
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Skarsgard, J
    Franzén, Lennart
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Experimental Pathology . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Laboratory Medicine, Department of Clinical Pathology and Clinical Genetics.
    Mårdh, Sven
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology.
    Rehfeld, JF
    Benign gastric polyps - Morphological and functional origin2003In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 48, no 7, p. 1292-1297Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The most common types of benign gastric polyps are fundic gland polyps, hyperplastic polyps, and adenomas. The aim of this study was to determine on which morphological and functional background benign gastric polyps develop. The study includes 85 consecutive patients with gastric polyps and sex and age-matched controls without polyps selected at random from a general population sample. The type of polyp was hyperplastic in 52 (61%), fundic gland in 18 (21%), adenoma in 10 (12%), carcinoid in 2 (2%), hamartoma in 2 ( 2%), and inflammatory fibroid in 1 (1%) of the cases. Routine biopsies from the gastric corpus and antrum were examined for presence of gastritis and H. pylori. Blood samples were analyzed for H. pylori antibodies, H+, K+-ATPase antibodies, gastrin, and pepsinogen I. Patients with hyperplastic polyps had increased P-gastrin concentrations and S-H+, K+-ATPase antibody titers and decreased S-pepsinogen I concentrations with a high prevalence of atrophic corpus gastritis or pangastritis. A similar pattern was observed among patients with adenomas, whereas patients with fundic gland polyps had normal serology and a lower prevalence of gastritis and H. pylori infection than controls. In conclusion, hyperplastic polyps and adenomas are generally associated with atrophic gastritis. Patients with fundic gland polyps seem to have a sounder mucosa than controls. Whereas the risk of malignant gastric neoplasia is increased in patients with hyperplastic polyps or adenomas, this does not seem to be the case in patients with fundic gland polyps.

  • 5.
    Ericson, Ann-Charlott
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Nur, E Mohammed
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Petersson, F
    Karolinska University Hospital.
    Kechagias, Stergios
    Linköping University, Department of Medicine and Health Sciences, Internal Medicine . Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre for Medicine, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    The Effects of Capsaicin on Gastrin Secretion in Isolated Human Antral Glands: Before and After Ingestion of Red Chilli2009In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 54, no 3, p. 491-498Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Background: Capsaicin is known to have regulatory effects on gastrointestinal functions via the vanilloid receptor (VR1). We reported previously that endocrine-like cells in the human antrum express VR1.

    Aim: To identify VR1-expressing endocrine-like cells in human antral glands and to examine whether stimulation with capsaicin causes release of gastrin, somatostatin, and serotonin. Further, to investigate the effects of a chilli-rich diet.

    Methods: Gastroscopic biopsies were received from 11 volunteers. Seven of the 11 subjects agreed to donor gastric biopsies a second time after a 3-week chilli-rich diet containing 1.4-4.2 mg capsaicin/day. VR1-immunoreactive cells were identified by double-staining immunohistochemistry against gastrin, somatostatin, and serotonin. For the stimulation studies, we used an in vitro method where antral glands in suspension were stimulated with 0.01 mM capsaicin and physiological buffer was added to the control vials. The concentrations of secreted hormones were detected and calculated with radioimmunoassay (RIA).

    Results: The light microscopic examination revealed that VR1 was localized in gastrin cells. The secretory studies showed an increase in release of gastrin and somatostatin compared to the control vials (P = 0.003; P = 0.013). Capsaicin-stimulation caused a consistent raise of the gastrin concentrations in the gland preparations from all subjects. A chilli-rich diet had an inhibitory effect on gastrin release upon stimulation compared to the results that were obtained before the start of the diet.

    Conclusion: This study shows that capsaicin stimulates gastrin secretion from isolated human antral glands, and that a chilli-rich diet decreases this secretion.

  • 6.
    Jonsson, Maria
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Norrgard, Orjan
    Umeå University.
    Forsgren, Sture
    Umeå University.
    Epithelial Expression of Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide in Ulcerative Colitis: Down-Regulation in Markedly Inflamed Colon2012In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 57, no 2, p. 303-310Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) has a number of important effects in intestinal physiology and pathology, including in ulcerative colitis (UC). The expression patterns of the predominant VIP receptor in the mucosa (the VPAC1 receptor) are unknown for the mucosa in UC. It is assumed that the sources of VIP in the intestine are the innervation and the inflammatory cells. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe VIP and VPAC1 receptor expression patterns in the epithelial layer of UC and non-UC patients were examined in the present study. The influence of marked inflammation of the mucosa was evaluated. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanSpecimens of the human colon, including the colon of UC patients, were examined concerning expressions of VIP and VPAC1 receptor, focusing on the epithelial layer. Immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization were utilized. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThere were VIP mRNA reactions and also marked VPAC1 receptor immunoreactions in the normal and slightly/moderately affected epithelium. VIP mRNA reactions were not detected and VPAC1 immunoreactions were minimal in response to marked mucosal derangement. less thanbrgreater than less thanbrgreater thanThe findings suggest that there is a local production of VIP in the epithelial cells in normal and slightly/moderately inflamed mucosa but not in severely inflamed mucosa. Furthermore, a marked downregulation in VPAC1 receptor expressions occurs in the epithelium in severe UC. Based on the knowledge that VIP can have trophic, healing and anti-inflammatory effects, it is likely that the decrease in VIP mRNA and VPAC1 receptor reactions seen in severely affected mucosa in UC may be associated with adverse effects on intestinal function.

  • 7.
    Kjellén, G.
    et al.
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Diagnostic Radiology, and Rheumatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden .
    Fransson, Sven-Göran
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Diagnostic Radiology, and Rheumatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Lindström, F.
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Diagnostic Radiology, and Rheumatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Sökjer, H.
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Diagnostic Radiology, and Rheumatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Tibbling, L.
    Departments of Otolaryngology, Diagnostic Radiology, and Rheumatology, University Hospital, Linköping, Sweden.
    Esophageal function, radiography, and dysphagia in Sjögren's syndrome1986In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 31, no 3, p. 225-229Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Esophageal function and anatomy were investigated with manometry, acid perfusion test, acid clearing test, and x-ray in 11 patients with primary Sjögren's syndrom (SS) and in 11 with secondary SS. The manometric investigation revealed minor motor differences in the SS patients as compared to 16 controls, ie, shorter peristaltic contraction time of the whole esophagus, and faster peristaltic velocity preferably in the distal part of the esophagus, while the results from the reflux tests did not differ between patients and controls. Radiographic examination revealed upper esophageal webs in 10% (2/20), and hiatal hernia in 25% (5/20). The dysphagia as reported by 73% of the patients cannot be explained by webs or impaired motor function and is regarded to be secondary to lack of saliva, making the solid bolus passage difficult.

  • 8.
    Noren, Elisabeth
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Regional Jönköping County, Sweden.
    Mellander, Marie-Rose
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Almer, Sven
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden; Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden.
    Söderman, Jan
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Cell Biology. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. Regional Jonköping County, Sweden.
    Genetic Variation and Gene Expression Levels of Tight Junction Genes Indicates Relationships Between PTEN as well as MAGI1 and Microscopic Colitis2018In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 105-112Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Microscopic colitis (MC) has been associated with increased paracellular permeability. Therefore, we aimed to investigate potential associations between MC and several genes encoding tight junction (TJ) proteins reported to interact with each other. The association between MC and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP; n = 63) within TJ genes (F11R, MAGI1, MAGI2, MAGI3, PARD3, PTEN, and TJP1) were investigated in a case-control study (n (MC patients) = 104 and n (controls) = 423). The genes that exhibited an association with MC were further investigated for gene expression related to genotype, MC phenotype, and gender using colonic biopsies from MC patients (n = 25) and controls (n = 58). Based on the number of investigated genes and after correction for multiple testing, an association was detected between a SNP marker in PTEN (rs1234224) and both MC overall (OR = 1.70, 95% CI 1.23-2.34, p = 0.001) and collagenous colitis (CC; OR = 1.79, 95% CI 1.22-2.62, p = 0.003). Further, SNP markers in MAGI1 (rs17417230) and F11R (rs790055) were associated with MC overall (OR = 1.58, 95% CI 1.14-2.19, p = 0.006) and with CC (OR = 2.58, 95% CI 1.27-5.25, p = 0.007), respectively. However, none of the associated SNPs contributed markedly to the expression of the respective genes. Nonetheless, decreased MAGI1 (p = 3.47 x 10(-4)) and PTEN (p = 0.004) expression was associated with lymphocytic colitis (LC) and CC, respectively, compared to controls. Decreased expression of PTEN and MAGI1 in the colonic mucosa might contribute to the pathogenesis of MC and its sub-phenotypes. Furthermore, our study indicates that genetic variants of TJ components are predisposing factors in the etiology of MC. Finally, F11R, MAGI1, and PTEN are new candidate genes that exhibit an association with MC.

  • 9.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Biomedicine and Surgery, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Franzén, Lennart
    Department of Pathology, Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Gastric epithelial proliferation and p53 and p21 expression in a general population sample: relations to age, sex, and mucosal changes associated with H. pylori infection2002In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 47, no 7, p. 1558-1566Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Helicobacter pylori infection is the main cause of chronic gastritis. The infection has been linked to altered proliferative activity and changes in various cell cycle regulating proteins. To determine, in a general population sample, the proliferative activity and expression of p53 and p21 in males and females of different age groups with and without H. pylori-associated chronic gastritis, gastric biopsies from 273 subjects (188 with and 85 without H. pylori infection) randomly selected from a general population were examined immunohistochemically for Ki-67, p53, and p21. One thousand epithelial cells, including the surface, neck, and glandular areas, were counted in both the corpus and the antrum. Results are expressed as the percentage of positive cells. Subjects with H. pylori infection showed significantly increased proliferative activity and expression of p53 compared to uninfected individuals. Regarding the expression of p21, no difference was detected. Multiple linear regression analysis showed significant associations between chronic inflammation or inflammatory activity, on the one hand, and the degree of proliferation in both the corpus and the antrum, on the other hand. In the antrum, the degree of H. pylori colonization was related to the expression of p53. H. pylori seems to cause increased proliferation and increased expression of p53 (but not p21) in the gastric mucosa, neither of which is age or sex dependent. The proliferative activity is related mainly to events associated with inflammation, while the expression of p53 in the antrum is associated with the degree of H. pylori infection. The action of p53 appears to be independent of p21 activity.

  • 10.
    Petersson, Fredrik
    et al.
    Pathology Research Department, Ryhov Hospital, Jönköping, Sweden and Department of Pathology, Karolinska University Hospital, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Franzén, Lennart E
    Department of Pathology, Medical Centre Hospital, Örebro, Sweden.
    Borch, Kurt
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences.
    Characterization of the gastric cardia in volunteers from the general population: type of mucosa, helicobacter pylori infection, inflammation, mucosal proliferative activity, p53 and p21 expression, and relations to gastritis2010In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 55, no 1, p. 46-53Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The aim of this research was to characterize the mucosa of the gastric cardia in relation to infection with Helicobacter pylori and the occurrence of chronic gastritis in other parts of the stomach in a sample of the general population. In this study, 80 adult volunteers underwent esophagogastroscopy with biopsies from the gastric cardia, corpus, and antrum. Gastritis was classified according to the Sydney system. Chronic gastritis (cardia excepted) was diagnosed in 35 subjects, 30 with Hpylori infection. Epithelial proliferative activity (Ki-67), p53- and p21 expression were examined quantitatively with cell counting after immunohistochemical stainings. Esophagitis was diagnosed macroscopically. Fourty eight subjects had cardia-type and 32 corpus-type mucosa in the anatomical cardia. The prevalence of esophagitis (nine cases) did not differ between these groups. Carditis was more prevalent among subjects with cardia-type mucosa (73 vs. 28%, P < 0.0001). Hpylori was present in 48% of those with cardia-type and 25% of those with corpus-type mucosa (P = 0.06). Of the 44 subjects with carditis, 31 had Hpylori in this location. The group with Hpylori infection had significantly higher mucosal proliferative activity when compared to uninfected subjects. Among the subjects with H. pylori-associated carditis, more p53-positive epithelial cells were detected compared to both the non-infected group (P = 0.0004) and to subjects with non-Hpylori-associated carditis (P = 0.03). In subjects with cardia-type mucosa, and both carditis and gastritis, the degree of chronic inflammation was higher in the cardia compared to the corpus and antrum and the p53 expression was significantly higher in the cardia compared to the corpus, but similar to that in the antrum. The proliferative activity was significantly higher in the antrum compared to the cardia and corpus, respectively. In conclusion, H. pylori infection, carditis, and increased p53 expression are more common in subjects with cardia- than corpus-type mucosa in the gastric cardia. Carditis is mainly related to Hpylori infection. There are some differences regarding inflammation, proliferative activity, and p53 expression between the cardia and other regions of the stomach, yet the significance of these differences remains to be clarified.

  • 11.
    Silva, M.A.
    et al.
    Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Health Science Centre 3N5C, 1200 Main St. West, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
    Quera, R.
    Internal Medicine Department, University of Chile Clinical Hospital, Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile.
    Valenzuela, J.
    Internal Medicine Department, University of Chile Clinical Hospital, Clínica Las Condes, Santiago, Chile.
    Salim, Sa´ad
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery .
    Söderholm, Johan D
    Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Surgery . Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Centre of Surgery and Oncology, Department of Surgery in Östergötland.
    Perdue, M.H.
    Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Health Science Centre 3N5C, 1200 Main St. West, Hamilton, ON L8N 3Z5, Canada.
    Dendritic cells and toll-like receptors 2 and 4 in the ileum of Crohn's disease patients2008In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 53, no 7, p. 1917-1928Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated myeloid-dendritic cell (DC) marker and Toll-like receptor (TLR)-2 and 4 distributions in ileal samples from Crohn's disease (CD) patients (n = 14) and controls (n = 13). In controls, no TLR-2+ cells were observed, and higher numbers of TLR-4+ and DC-SIGN+ cells (P < 0.01) were detected in ileal samples when compared versus colonic tissues. In non-inflamed CD ileum, TLR-4+ and DC-SGN+ cells were depleted from superficial areas of the villus, and a significant CD1a+ cell infiltration (P < 0.01) was observed when compared to ileal controls and non-inflamed colonic CD samples. In inflamed CD ileum, DC-SIGN+, CD1a+, TLR-4+ and few TLR-4 +DC-SIGN+ cells were detected as well as CD83 depletion. No correlation between TLR-2 and DC markers was detected in CD samples. A unique distribution of myeloid-DC markers characterized the CD ileum. Also, the presence of significant amounts of ileal CD1a+ cells may provide a relevant DC-mediated mechanism for antigen recognition in the pathogenesis of CD. © 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  • 12.
    Tjellstrom, Bo
    et al.
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Högberg, Lotta
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council Ostergotland, Sweden.
    Stenhammar, Lars
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Region Östergötland, Center of Paediatrics and Gynaecology and Obstetrics, Department of Paediatrics in Norrköping. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences. County Council Ostergotland, Sweden.
    Magnusson, Karl-Eric
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Microbiology and Molecular Medicine. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Midtvedt, Tore
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Norin, Elisabeth
    Karolinska Institute, Sweden.
    Sundqvist, Tommy
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Division of Clinical Sciences. Linköping University, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences.
    Letter: A Role for Bacteria in Celiac Disease? in DIGESTIVE DISEASES AND SCIENCES, vol 61, issue 7, pp 2140-21402016In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 61, no 7, p. 2140-2140Article in journal (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    n/a

  • 13.
    Walter, Susanna A
    et al.
    Linköping University, Department of Clinical and Experimental Medicine, Gastroenterology and Hepatology. Linköping University, Faculty of Health Sciences. Östergötlands Läns Landsting, Heart and Medicine Centre, Department of Endocrinology and Gastroenterology UHL.
    Kjellström, Lars
    Department of Gastroenterology, Sabbatsbergs Hospital, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Talley, Nicholas J
    Faculty of Health, University of Newcastle, Newcastle, NSW, Australia.
    Andreasson, Anna Nixon
    Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Nyhlin, Henry
    Department of Gastroenterology, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Agréus, Lars
    Center for Family and Community Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden.
    Prospective Diary Evaluation of Unexplained Abdominal Pain and Bowel Dysfunction: A Population-Based Colonoscopy Study2011In: Digestive Diseases and Sciences, ISSN 0163-2116, E-ISSN 1573-2568, Vol. 56, no 5, p. 1444-1451Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    INTRODUCTION: Diagnostic criteria for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) have not been validated by prospective symptom diary. We investigated the bowel patterns in community subjects with and without non-organic abdominal pain, and compared the symptoms with subjects fulfilling the Rome II criteria (IBS).

    METHODS: From the Swedish population register, a random sample completed an abdominal symptom questionnaire. Responders were subsequently invited for a clinical evaluation and offered a colonoscopy regardless of whether they had abdominal symptoms or not. A total of 268 subjects underwent colonoscopy, clinical evaluation by gastroenterologist, laboratory investigations, and completed the Rome questionnaire and prospective gastrointestinal (GI) symptom diaries for 1 week. Twenty-three subjects of 268 were excluded due to organic GI disease.

    RESULTS: Subjects recorded 2,194 bowel movements and 370 abdominal pain episodes on 1,504 days. Subjects with pain in the diary (n = 81) had higher stool frequency (P = 0.01), more urgency (P = 0.0002), feelings of incomplete evacuation (P = 0.0002), nausea (P = 0.0009), and abdominal bloating (P = 0.0005) than subjects without pain (n = 151). Twenty-eight subjects (12%) fulfilled the Rome II criteria for IBS. Together, they had 96 pain episodes but only 4% were improved by defecation; 29% of the pain episodes started or worsened after a meal. Subjects with IBS and other subjects with non-organic abdominal pain (n = 64) exhibited no differences in terms of the proportions of pain episodes improved by defecation, bloating, stool frequency, consistency, or defecatory symptoms.

    CONCLUSIONS: Current criteria for IBS that rely on recall of the relationship between abdominal pain and bowel disturbance may overcall this association when measured prospectively.

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